• We present a study of the dust-to-gas ratios in five nearby galaxies NGC 628 (M74), NGC 6503, NGC 7793, UGC 5139 (Holmberg I), and UGC 4305 (Holmberg II). Using Hubble Space Telescope broad band WFC3/UVIS UV and optical images from the Treasury program LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) combined with archival HST/ACS data, we correct thousands of individual stars for extinction across these five galaxies using an isochrone-matching (reddening-free Q) method. We generate extinction maps for each galaxy from the individual stellar extinctions using both adaptive and fixed resolution techniques, and correlate these maps with neutral HI and CO gas maps from literature, including The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) and the HERA CO-Line Extragalactic Survey (HERACLES). We calculate dust-to-gas ratios and investigate variations in the dust-to-gas ratio with galaxy metallicity. We find a power law relationship between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity, consistent with other studies of dust-to-gas ratio compared to metallicity. We find a change in the relation when H$_2$ is not included. This implies that underestimation of $N_{H_2}$ in low-metallicity dwarfs from a too-low CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor $X_{CO}$ could have produced too low a slope in the derived relationship between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity. We also compare our extinctions to those derived from fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) using the Bayesian Extinction and Stellar Tool (BEAST) for NGC 7793 and find systematically lower extinctions from SED-fitting as compared to isochrone matching.
  • The Hubble Source Catalog (HSC) combines lists of sources detected on images obtained with the WFPC2, ACS and WFC3 instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) available in the Hubble Legacy Archive. The catalog contains time-domain information with about two million of its sources detected with the same instrument and filter in at least five HST visits. The Hubble Catalog of Variables (HCV) project aims to identify HSC sources showing significant brightness variations. A magnitude-dependent threshold in the median absolute deviation of photometric measurements (an outlier-resistant measure of lightcurve scatter) is adopted as the variability-detection statistic. It is supplemented with a cut in $\chi_{\rm red}^2$ that removes sources with large photometric errors. A pre-processing procedure involving bad image identification, outlier rejection and computation of local magnitude zero-point corrections is applied to HSC lightcurves before computing the variability detection statistic. About 52000 HSC sources are identified as candidate variables, among which 7800 show variability in more than one filter. Visual inspection suggests that $\sim 70\%$ of the candidates detected in multiple filters are true variables while the remaining $\sim 30\%$ are sources with aperture photometry corrupted by blending, imaging artifacts or image processing anomalies. The candidate variables have AB magnitudes in the range 15-27$^{m}$ with the median 22$^{m}$. Among them are the stars in our own and nearby galaxies as well as active galactic nuclei.
  • The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is a multiwavelength Cycle 21 Treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope. It studied 50 nearby star-forming galaxies in five bands from the near UV to the I-band, combining new Wide Field Camera 3 observations with archival Advanced Camera for Surveys data. LEGUS was designed to investigate how star formation occurs and develops on both small and large scales, and how it relates to the galactic environments. In this paper we present the photometric catalogs for all the apparently single stars identified in the 50 LEGUS galaxies. Photometric catalogs and mosaicked images for all filters are available for download. We present optical and near UV color-magnitude diagrams for all the galaxies. For each galaxy we derived the distance from the tip of the red giant branch. We then used the NUV color-magnitude diagrams to identify stars more massive than 14 Mo, and compared their number with the number of massive stars expected from the GALEX FUV luminosity. Our analysis shows that the fraction of massive stars forming in star clusters and stellar associations is about constant with the star formation rate. This lack of a relation suggests that the time scale for evaporation of unbound structures is comparable or longer than 10 Myr. At low star formation rates this translates to an excess of mass in clustered environments as compared to model predictions of cluster evolution, suggesting that a significant fraction of stars form in unbound systems.
  • We aim to construct an exceptionally deep (V ~< 27) catalog of variable objects in selected Galactic and extragalactic fields visited multiple times by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). While HST observations of some of these fields were searched for specific types of variables before (most notably, the extragalactic Cepheids), we attempt a systematic study of the population of variable objects of all types at the magnitude range not easily accessible with ground-based telescopes. The variability timescales that can be probed range from hours to years depending on how often a particular field has been visited. For source extraction and cross-matching of sources between visits we rely on the Hubble Source Catalog which includes 10^7 objects detected with WFPC2, ACS, and WFC3 HST instruments. The lightcurves extracted from the HSC are corrected for systematic effects by applying local zero-point corrections and are screened for bad measurements. For each lightcurve we compute variability indices sensitive to a broad range of variability types. The indices characterize the overall lightcurve scatter and smoothness. Candidate variables are selected as having variability index values significantly higher than expected for objects of similar brightness in the given set of observations. The Hubble Catalog of Variables will be released in 2018.
  • We report the large effort which is producing comprehensive high-level young star cluster (YSC) catalogues for a significant fraction of galaxies observed with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) Hubble treasury program. We present the methodology developed to extract cluster positions, verify their genuine nature, produce multiband photometry (from NUV to NIR), and derive their physical properties via spectral energy distribution fitting analyses. We use the nearby spiral galaxy NGC628 as a test case for demonstrating the impact that LEGUS will have on our understanding of the formation and evolution of YSCs and compact stellar associations within their host galaxy. Our analysis of the cluster luminosity function from the UV to the NIR finds a steepening at the bright end and at all wavelengths suggesting a dearth of luminous clusters. The cluster mass function of NGC628 is consistent with a power-law distribution of slopes $\sim -2$ and a truncation of a few times $10^5$ M$_\odot$. After their formation YSCs and compact associations follow different evolutionary paths. YSCs survive for a longer timeframe, confirming their being potentially bound systems. Associations disappear on time scales comparable to hierarchically organized star-forming regions, suggesting that they are expanding systems. We find mass-independent cluster disruption in the inner region of NGC628, while in the outer part of the galaxy there is little or no disruption. We observe faster disruption rates for low mass ($\leq$ $10^4$ M$_\odot$) clusters suggesting that a mass-dependent component is necessary to fully describe the YSC disruption process in NGC628.
  • The Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) is a Cycle 21 Treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope, aimed at the investigation of star formation and its relation with galactic environment in nearby galaxies, from the scales of individual stars to those of ~kpc-size clustered structures. Five-band imaging, from the near-ultraviolet to the I-band, with the Wide Field Camera 3, plus parallel optical imaging with the Advanced Camera for Surveys, is being collected for selected pointings of 50 galaxies within the local 12 Mpc. The filters used for the observations with the Wide Field Camera 3 are: F275W(2,704 A), F336W(3,355 A), F438W(4,325 A), F555W(5,308 A), and F814W(8,024 A); the parallel observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys use the filters: F435W(4,328 A), F606W(5,921 A), and F814W(8,057 A). The multi-band images are yielding accurate recent (<~50 Myr) star formation histories from resolved massive stars and the extinction-corrected ages and masses of star clusters and associations. The extensive inventories of massive stars and clustered systems will be used to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of star formation within galaxies. This will, in turn, inform theories of galaxy evolution and improve the understanding of the physical underpinning of the gas-star formation relation and the nature of star formation at high redshift. This paper describes the survey, its goals and observational strategy, and the initial science results. Because LEGUS will provide a reference survey and a foundation for future observations with JWST and with ALMA, a large number of data products are planned for delivery to the community.
  • STEP (the SMC in Time: Evolution of a Prototype interacting late-type dwarf galaxy) is a Guaranteed Time Observation survey being performed at the VST (the ESO VLT Survey Telescope). STEP will image an area of 74 deg$^2$ covering the main body of the Small Magellanic Cloud (32 deg$^2$), the Bridge that connects it to the Large Magellanic Cloud (30 deg$^2$) and a small part of the Magellanic Stream (2 deg$^2$). Our $g,r,i,H_{\alpha}$ photometry is able to resolve individual stars down to magnitudes well below the main-sequence turnoff of the oldest populations. In this first paper we describe the observing strategy, the photometric techniques, and the upcoming data products of the survey. We also present preliminary results for the first two fields for which data acquisition is completed, including some detailed analysis of the two stellar clusters IC\,1624 and NGC\,419.
  • We use deep images acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the filters F555W and F814W to characterize the properties of NGC 376, a young star cluster located in the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Using isochrone fitting we derive for NGC 376 an age of 28+/-7 Myr, in good agreement with previous studies. The high spatial resolution ACS data allow us to determine the center of gravity of the cluster and to construct extended surface brightness and radial density profiles. Neither of these profiles can be fitted with a theoretical model, suggesting that the cluster is not in virial equilibrium. Considering the young age of the cluster, we speculate that the distortion of the radial profiles may be the result of the rapid gas dispersal that follows the initial phase of star formation. The cluster shows clear evidence of dynamical mass segregation. From the properties of the radial profiles and the present day mass function (PDMF) we conclude that NGC 376 appears to have already lost nearly 90% of its initial stellar mass, probably as a consequence of the sudden gas dispersal that follows the early phase of star formation (SF).
  • We present the photometric catalogs for the star-forming cluster NGC 602 in the wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud covering a range of wavelengths from optical HST/ACS (F555W, F814W) and SMARTS/ANDICAM (V, I) to infrared (Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 micron and MIPS 24 micron). Combining this with IRSF (InfraRed Survey Facility) near-infrared photometry (J, H, Ks), we compare the young main sequence (MS) and pre-main sequence (PMS) populations prominent in the optical with the current young stellar object (YSO) populations revealed by the infrared (IR). We analyze the MS and PMS population with isochrones in color-magnitude diagrams to derive ages and masses. The optical data reveal ~565 PMS candidates, low mass Stage III YSOs. We characterize ~40 YSOs by fitting their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to a grid of models (Robitaille et al. 2007) to derive luminosities, masses and evolutionary phase (Stage I-III). The higher resolution HST images reveal that ~70% of the YSO candidates are either multiples or protoclusters. For YSOs and PMS sources found in common, we find a consistency in the masses derived. We use the YSO mass function to derive a present-day star-formation rate of ~0.2-1.0 Msun/yr/kpc^2, similar to the rate derived from the optical star formation history suggesting a constant star formation rate for this region. We demonstrate a progression of star formation from the optical star cluster center to the edge of the star forming dust cloud. We derive lifetimes of a few 10^5 years for the YSO Stages I and II.
  • We observed six fields of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with the Advanced Camera for Survey on board the Hubble Space Telescope in the F555W and F814W filters. These fields sample regions characterized by very different star and gas densities, and, possibly, by different evolutionary histories. We find that the SMC was already forming stars ~12 Gyr ago, even if the lack of a clear horizontal branch suggests that in the first few billion years the star formation activity was low. Within the uncertainties of our two-band photometry, we find evidence of a radial variation in chemical enrichment, with the SMC outskirts characterized by lower metallicity than the central zones. From our CMDs we also infer that the SMC formed stars over a long interval of time until ~2-3 Gyr ago. After a period of modest activity, star formation increased again in the recent past, especially in the bar and the wing of the SMC, where we see an enhancement in the star-formation activity starting from ~500 Myr ago. The inhomogeneous distribution of stars younger than ~100 Myr indicates that recent star formation has mainly developed locally.
  • The young star cluster NGC 602 and its associated HII region, N90, formed in a relatively isolated and diffuse environment in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud. Its isolation from other regions of massive star formation and the relatively simple surrounding HI shell structure allows us to constrain the processes that may have led to its formation and to study conditions leading to massive star formation. We use images from Hubble Space Telescope and high resolution echelle spectrographic data from the Anglo-Australian Telescope along with 21-cm neutral hydrogen (HI) spectrum survey data and the shell catalogue derived from it to establish a likely evolutionary scenario leading to the formation of NGC 602. We identify a distinct HI cloud component that is likely the progenitor cloud of the cluster and HII region which probably formed in blister fashion from the cloud's periphery. We also find that the past interaction of HI shells can explain the current location and radial velocity of the nebula. The surrounding Interstellar Medium is diffuse and dust-poor as demonstrated by a low visual optical depth throughout the nebula and an average HI density of the progenitor cloud estimated at 1 cm^-3. These conditions suggest that the NGC 602 star formation event was produced by compression and turbulence associated with HI shell interactions. It therefore represents a single star forming event in a low gas density region.
  • As first Paper of a series devoted to study the old stellar population in clusters and fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud, we present deep observations of NGC121 in the F555W and F814W filters, obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. The resulting color-magnitude diagram reaches ~3.5 mag below the main-sequence turn-off; deeper than any previous data. We derive the age of NGC121 using both absolute and relative age-dating methods. Fitting isochrones in the ACS photometric system to the observed ridge line of NGC121, gives ages of 11.8 +- 0.5 Gyr (Teramo), 11.2 +- 0.5 Gyr (Padova) and 10.5 +- 0.5 Gyr (Dartmouth). The cluster ridge line is best approximated by the alpha-enhanced Dartmouth isochrones. Placing our relative ages on an absolute age scale, we find ages of 10.9 +- 0.5 Gyr (from the magnitude difference between the main-sequence turn-off and the horizontal branch) and 11.5 +- 0.5 Gyr (from the absolute magnitude of the horizontal branch), respectively. These five different age determinations are all lower by 2 - 3 Gyr than the ages of the oldest Galactic globular clusters of comparable metallicity. Therefore we confirm the earlier finding that the oldest globular cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud, NGC121, is a few Gyr younger than its oldest counterparts in the Milky Way and in other nearby dwarf galaxies such as the Large Magellanic Cloud, Fornax, and Sagittarius. If it were accreted into the Galactic halo, NGC121 would resemble the ''young halo globulars'', although it is not as young as the youngest globular clusters associated with the Sagittarius dwarf. The young age of NGC121 could result from delayed cluster formation in the Small Magellanic Cloud or result from the random survival of only one example of an initially small number star clusters.
  • NGC 602 is a young stellar cluster located in a peripheral region of the Small Magellanic Cloud known as the wing. Far from the main body of the galaxy and abutting the Magellanic Bridge, the SMC's wing is characterized by low gas and stellar content. With deep optical imaging from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have discovered an extensive pre-Main Sequence (PMS) population, with stellar masses in the range 0.6-3 Solar masses. These low mass PMS stars formed coevally with the central cluster about 4 Myr ago. Spitzer Space Telescope (Spitzer) images of the same region from the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) also reveal a population of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs), some of which are still embedded in nebular material and most of which likely formed even more recently than the young stars detected with HST/ACS imaging. We infer that star formation started in this region about 4 Myr ago with the formation of the central cluster and gradually propagated towards the outskirts where star formation is presently ongoing.
  • Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) are presented for the Spitzer SAGE (Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution) survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). IRAC and MIPS 24 um epoch one data are presented. These data represent the deepest, widest mid-infrared CMDs of their kind ever produced in the LMC. Combined with the 2MASS survey, the diagrams are used to delineate the evolved stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud as well as Galactic foreground and extragalactic background populations. Some 32000 evolved stars brighter than the tip of the red giant branch are identified. Of these, approximately 17500 are classified as oxygen-rich, 7000 carbon-rich, and another 1200 as ``extreme'' asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Brighter members of the latter group have been called ``obscured'' AGB stars in the literature owing to their dusty circumstellar envelopes. A large number (1200) of luminous oxygen--rich AGB stars/M supergiants are also identified. Finally, there is strong evidence from the 24 um MIPS channel that previously unexplored, lower luminosity oxygen-rich AGB stars contribute significantly to the mass loss budget of the LMC (1200 such sources are identified).
  • We report the discovery of a rich population of low mass stars in the young, massive star forming region N66/NGC346 in the Small Magellanic Cloud, from deep V, I and H alpha images taken with the HST/ACS. These stars have likely formed together with the NGC346 cluster, ~3-5 Myr ago. Their magnitude and colors are those of pre-main sequence stars in the mass range 0.6-3 Mo, mostly concentrated in the main cluster, but with secondary subclusters spread over a region across ~45 pc. These subclusters appear to be spatially coincident with previously known knots of molecular gas identified in ground based and ISO observations. We show that N66/NGC346 is a complex region, being shaped by its massive stars, and the observations presented here represent a key step towards the understanding of how star formation occurred and has progressed in this low metallicity environment.
  • We present the first detection of 12 CO J=2->1 and 12 CO J=1->0 emission from the LBV AG Carinae. AG Carinae resides in a region which is very rich in molecular gas with complex motions. We find evidence of a slow outflow of molecular gas, expanding at ~ 7 km/s. This emission appears spatially unresolved. We argue that it is spatially localised, rather than extended, and possibly associated with the immediate circumstellar region of AG Carinae. Does it originate from a circumstellar envelope, similar to carbon stars, or from a circumstellar disk? The option of the circumstellar disk is preferable because it is consistent with additional independent indications for the existence of wind asymmetries in close proximity to the central star, found from spectropolarimetry and analysis of the UV and optical line profiles, and it provides the conditions of density and shielding necessary for the survival of the CO molecules in proximity to such a hot star (Teff ~ 14000 K - 20000 K). In the assumption that the CO emission originated when AG Carinae was in an evolved state, we derive a lower limit to the mass of molecular gas of 2.8 solar masses. This is smaller, but still comparable with the mass of ionized gas present in the circumstellar environment (4.2 solar masses), with the implication that the molecular gas fraction can contribute significantly to the overall mass lost from the central star in its post main sequence evolution.
  • We present WFPC2-HST photometry (in the F439W and F555W bands) of the resolved stars in NGC 1569. The derived color-magnitude diagram (CMD) contains 2800 objects down to the 26th mag, and is complete down to the 23rd. Adopting the literature distance modulus and reddening, the CMD samples stars more massive than 4 Mo, corresponding to a look-back time of 0.15 Gyr approximately. The data are compared to synthetic CMDs to derive the recent star formation history in NGC 1569. It is found that the observed field has experienced a global burst of star formation (SF) lasting at least 0.1 Gyr, and ended a few Myr ago. During the burst, the SF rate was approximately constant, and, if quiescent periods occurred, they lasted less than 10 Myr. The level of the SF rate was very high: 0.5 Mo/yr for a Salpeter IMF, in stars with mass ranging from 0.1 to 120 Mo. When scaled for the surveyed area, the SF rate is approximately 100 times larger than found in the most active dwarf irregulars in the Local Group. The data are consistent with a Salpeter IMF, or slightly steeper exponents. We discuss the implications of our results in the general context of the evolution of dwarf galaxies.