• The preflare phase of the flare SOL2011-08-09T03:52 is unique in its long duration, its coverage by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the presence of three well-developed soft X-ray (SXR) peaks. No hard X-rays (HXR) are observed in the preflare phase. Here we report that also no associated radio emission at 17 GHz was found despite the higher sensitivity of the radio instrument. The ratio between the SXR peaks and the upper limit of the radio peaks is larger by more than one order of magnitude compared to regular flares. The result suggests that the ratio between acceleration and heating in the preflare phase was different than in regular flares. Acceleration to relativistic energies, if any, occurred with lower efficiency.
  • Hydrides are simple compounds containing one or a few hydrogen atoms bonded to a heavier atom. They are fundamental precursor molecules in cosmic chemistry and many hydride ions have become observable in high quality for the first time thanks to the Herschel Space Observatory. Ionized hydrides, such as CH+ and OH+, and also HCO+ that affect the chemistry of molecules such as water, provide complementary information on irradiation by far UV (FUV) or X-rays and gas temperature. The targeted lines of CH+, OH+, H2O+, C+ and CH are detected mostly in blue-shifted absorption. H3O+ and SH+ are detected in emission and only toward some high-mass objects. The observed line parameters and correlations suggest two different origins, related to gas entrained by the outflows and to the circumstellar envelope. The column density ratios of CH+/OH+ are estimated from chemical slab models, assuming that the H2 density is given by the specific density model of each object at the beam radius. For the low-mass YSOs the observed ratio can be reproduced for an FUV flux of 2-400 times the ISRF at the location of the molecules. In two high-mass objects, the UV flux is 20-200 times the ISRF derived from absorption lines, and 300-600 ISRF using emission lines. If the FUV flux required for low-mass objects originates at the central protostar, a substantial FUV luminosity, up to 1.5 L_sun, is required. There is no molecular evidence for X-ray induced chemistry in the low-mass objects on the observed scales of a few 1000 AU. For high-mass regions, the FUV flux required to produce the observed molecular ratios is smaller than the unattenuated flux expected from the central object(s) at the Herschel beam radius. This is consistent with an FUV flux reduced by circumstellar extinction or by bloating of the protostar.
  • The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a new powerful tool for observing the Sun at high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. These capabilities can address a broad range of fundamental scientific questions in solar physics. The radiation observed by ALMA originates mostly from the chromosphere - a complex and dynamic region between the photosphere and corona, which plays a crucial role in the transport of energy and matter and, ultimately, the heating of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. Based on first solar test observations, strategies for regular solar campaigns are currently being developed. State-of-the-art numerical simulations of the solar atmosphere and modeling of instrumental effects can help constrain and optimize future observing modes for ALMA. Here we present a short technical description of ALMA and an overview of past efforts and future possibilities for solar observations at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths. In addition, selected numerical simulations and observations at other wavelengths demonstrate ALMA's scientific potential for studying the Sun for a large range of science cases.
  • The Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network (SSALMON) was initiated in 2014 in connection with two ALMA development studies. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new tool, which can also observe the Sun at high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. The international SSALMONetwork aims at coordinating the further development of solar observing modes for ALMA and at promoting scientific opportunities for solar physics with particular focus on numerical simulations, which can provide important constraints for the observing modes and can aid the interpretation of future observations. The radiation detected by ALMA originates mostly in the solar chromosphere - a complex and dynamic layer between the photosphere and corona, which plays an important role in the transport of energy and matter and the heating of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. Potential targets include active regions, prominences, quiet Sun regions, flares. Here, we give a brief overview over the network and potential science cases for future solar observations with ALMA.
  • In diffuse interstellar clouds the chemistry that leads to the formation of the oxygen bearing ions OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ begins with the ionization of atomic hydrogen by cosmic rays, and continues through subsequent hydrogen abstraction reactions involving H2. Given these reaction pathways, the observed abundances of these molecules are useful in constraining both the total cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen (zeta_H) and molecular hydrogen fraction, f(H2). We present observations targeting transitions of OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ made with the Herschel Space Observatory along 20 Galactic sight lines toward bright submillimeter continuum sources. Both OH+ and H2O+ are detected in absorption in multiple velocity components along every sight line, but H3O+ is only detected along 7 sight lines. From the molecular abundances we compute f(H2) in multiple distinct components along each line of sight, and find a Gaussian distribution with mean and standard deviation 0.042+-0.018. This confirms previous findings that OH+ and H2O+ primarily reside in gas with low H2 fractions. We also infer zeta_H throughout our sample, and find a log-normal distribution with mean log(zeta_H)=-15.75, (zeta_H=1.78x10^-16 s^-1), and standard deviation 0.29 for gas within the Galactic disk, but outside of the Galactic center. This is in good agreement with the mean and distribution of cosmic-ray ionization rates previously inferred from H3+ observations. Ionization rates in the Galactic center tend to be 10--100 times larger than found in the Galactic disk, also in accord with prior studies.
  • [Context] Two competing models describe the formation of massive stars in objects like the Orion Trapezium. In the turbulent core accretion model, the resulting stellar masses are directly related to the mass distribution of the cloud condensations. In the competitive accretion model, the gravitational potential of the protocluster captures gas from the surrounding cloud for which the individual cluster members compete. [Aims] With high resolution submillimeter observations of the structure, kinematics, and chemistry of the proto-Trapezium cluster W3 IRS5, we aim to determine which mode of star formation dominates. [Methods] We present 354 GHz Submillimeter Array observations at resolutions of 1"-3" (1800-5400 AU) of W3 IRS5. ...... [Results] The observations show five emission peaks (SMM1-5). SMM1 and SMM2 contain massive embedded stars (~20 Msun); SMM3-5 are starless or contain low-mass stars (<8 Msun). The inferred densities are high, >= 10^7 cm^-3, but the core masses are small, 0.2-0.6 Msun. The detected molecular emission reveals four different chemical zones. ...... [Conclusions] The proto-Trapezium cluster W3 IRS5 is an ideal test case to discriminate between models of massive star formation. Either the massive stars accrete locally from their local cores; in this case the small core masses imply that W3 IRS5 is at the very end stages (1000 yr) of infall and accretion, or the stars are accreting from the global collapse of a massive, cluster forming core. We find that the observed masses, densities and line widths observed toward W3 IRS 5 and the surrounding cluster forming core are consistent with the competitive accretion of gas at rates of Macc~10^-4 Msun yr^-1 by the massive young forming stars. ......
  • OH is a key species in the water chemistry of star-forming regions, because its presence is tightly related to the formation and destruction of water. This paper presents OH observations from 23 low- and intermediate-mass young stellar objects obtained with the PACS integral field spectrometer on-board Herschel in the context of the Water In Star-forming Regions with Herschel (WISH) key program. Most low-mass sources have compact OH emission (< 5000 AU scale), whereas the OH lines in most intermediate-mass sources are extended over the whole PACS detector field-of-view (> 20000 AU). The strength of the OH emission is correlated with various source properties such as the bolometric luminosity and the envelope mass, but also with the OI and H2O emission. Rotational diagrams for sources with many OH lines show that the level populations of OH can be approximated by a Boltzmann distribution with an excitation temperature at around 70 K. Radiative transfer models of spherically symmetric envelopes cannot reproduce the OH emission fluxes nor their broad line widths, strongly suggesting an outflow origin. Slab excitation models indicate that the observed excitation temperature can either be reached if the OH molecules are exposed to a strong far-infrared continuum radiation field or if the gas temperature and density are sufficiently high. Using realistic source parameters and radiation fields, it is shown for the case of Ser SMM1 that radiative pumping plays an important role in transitions arising from upper level energies higher than 300 K. The compact emission in the low-mass sources and the required presence of a strong radiation field and/or a high density to excite the OH molecules points towards an origin in shocks in the inner envelope close to the protostar.
  • OH is an important molecule in the H2O chemistry and the cooling budget of star-forming regions. The goal of the Herschel key program `Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel' (WISH) is to study H2O and related species during protostellar evolution. Our aim in this letter is to assess the origin of the OH emission from star-forming regions and constrain the properties of the emitting gas. High-resolution observations of the OH 2Pi1/2 J = 3/2-1/2 triplet at 1837.8 GHz (163.1 micron) towards the high-mass star-forming region W3 IRS 5 with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on Herschel reveal the first hyperfine velocity-resolved OH far-infrared spectrum of a star-forming region. The line profile of the OH emission shows two components: a narrow component (FWHM approx. 4-5 km/s) with partially resolved hyperfine structure resides on top of a broad (FWHM approx. 30 km/s) component. The narrow emission agrees well with results from radiative transfer calculations of a spherical envelope model for W3 IRS 5 with a constant OH abundance of approx. 8e-9. Comparison with H2O yields OH/H2O abundance ratios of around 1e-3 for T > 100 K and around unity for T < 100K, consistent with the current picture of the dense cloud chemistry with freeze-out and photodesorption. The broad component is attributed to outflow emission. An abundance ratio of OH/H2O > 0.028 in the outflow is derived from comparison with results of water line modeling. This ratio can be explained by a fast J-type shock or a slower UV-irradiated C-type shock.
  • RX J1713.7-3946 is one of the TeV {\gamma}-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) emitting synchrotron X rays. The SNR is associated with molecular gas located at ~1 kpc. We made new molecular observations toward the dense cloud cores, peaks A, C and D, in the SNR in the 12CO(J=2-1) and 13CO(J=2-1) transitions at angular resolution of 90". The most intense core in 13CO, peak C, was also mapped in the 12CO(J=4-3) transition at angular resolution of 38". Peak C shows strong signs of active star formation including bipolar outflow and a far-infrared protostellar source and has a steep gradient with a r^{-2.2$\pm$0.4} variation in the average density within radius r. Peak C and the other dense cloud cores are rim-brightened in synchrotron X rays, suggesting that the dense cloud cores are embedded within or on the outer boundary of the SNR shell. This confirms the earlier suggestion that the X rays are physically associated with the molecular gas (Fukui et al. 2003). We present a scenario where the densest molecular core, peak C, survived against the blast wave and is now embedded within the SNR. Numerical simulations of the shock-cloud interaction indicate that a dense clump can indeed survive shock erosion, since shock propagation speed is stalled in the dense clump. Additionally, the shock-cloud interaction induces turbulence and magnetic field amplification around the dense clump that may facilitate particle acceleration in the lower-density inter-clump space leading to the enhanced synchrotron X rays around dense cores.
  • We investigate the physics and chemistry of the gas and dust in dense photon-dominated regions (PDRs), along with their dependence on the illuminating UV field. Using Herschel-HIFI observations, we study the gas energetics in NGC 7023 in relation to the morphology of this nebula. NGC 7023 is the prototype of a PDR illuminated by a B2V star and is one of the key targets of Herschel. Our approach consists in determining the energetics of the region by combining the information carried by the mid-IR spectrum (extinction by classical grains, emission from very small dust particles) with that of the main gas coolant lines. In this letter, we discuss more specifically the intensity and line profile of the 158 micron (1901 GHz) [CII] line measured by HIFI and provide information on the emitting gas. We show that both the [CII] emission and the mid-IR emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) arise from the regions located in the transition zone between atomic and molecular gas. Using the Meudon PDR code and a simple transfer model, we find good agreement between the calculated and observed [CII] intensities. HIFI observations of NGC 7023 provide the opportunity to constrain the energetics at the surface of PDRs. Future work will include analysis of the main coolant line [OI] and use of a new PDR model that includes PAH-related species.
  • Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) is a Herschel Key Program investigating the water chemistry in young stellar objects (YSOs) during protostellar evolution. Hydroxyl (OH) is one of the reactants in the chemical network most closely linked to the formation and destruction of H2O. High-temperature chemistry connects OH and H2O through the OH + H2 <-> H2O + H reactions. Formation of H2O from OH is efficient in the high-temperature regime found in shocks and the innermost part of protostellar envelopes. Moreover, in the presence of UV photons, OH can be produced from the photo-dissociation of H2O. High-resolution spectroscopy of the OH 163.12 micron triplet towards HH 46 and NGC 1333 IRAS 2A was carried out with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board Herschel. The low- and intermediate-mass YSOs HH 46, TMR 1, IRAS 15398-3359, DK Cha, NGC 7129 FIRS 2, and NGC 1333 IRAS 2A were observed with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) in four transitions of OH and two [OI] lines. The OH transitions at 79, 84, 119, and 163 micron and [OI] emission at 63 and 145 micron were detected with PACS towards the class I low-mass YSOs as well as the intermediate-mass and class I Herbig Ae sources. No OH emission was detected from the class 0 YSO NGC 1333 IRAS 2A, though the 119 micron was detected in absorption. With HIFI, the 163.12 micron was not detected from HH 46 and only tentatively detected from NGC 1333 IRAS 2A. The combination of the PACS and HIFI results for HH 46 constrains the line width (FWHM > 11 km/s) and indicates that the OH emission likely originates from shocked gas. This scenario is supported by trends of the OH flux increasing with the [OI] flux and the bolometric luminosity. Similar OH line ratios for most sources suggest that OH has comparable excitation temperatures despite the different physical properties of the sources.
  • We report the first detection of the ground-state rotational transition of the methylidyne cation CH+ towards the massive star-forming region DR21 with the HIFI instrument onboard the Herschel satellite. The line profile exhibits a broad emission line, in addition to two deep and broad absorption features associated with the DR21 molecular ridge and foreground gas. These observations allow us to determine a CH+ J=1-0 line frequency of 835137 +/- 3 MHz, in good agreement with a recent experimental determination. We estimate the CH+ column density to be a few 1e13 cm^-2 in the gas seen in emission, and > 1e14 cm^-2 in the components responsible for the absorption, which is indicative of a high line of sight average abundance [CH+]/[H] > 1.2x10^-8. We show that the CH+ column densities agree well with the predictions of state-of-the-art C-shock models in dense UV-illuminated gas for the emission line, and with those of turbulent dissipation models in diffuse gas for the absorption lines.
  • High-resolution far-infrared and sub-millimetre spectroscopy of water lines is an important tool to understand the physical and chemical properties of cometary atmospheres. We present observations of several rotational ortho- and para-water transitions in comet C/2008 Q3 (Garradd) performed with HIFI on Herschel. These observations have provided the first detection of the 2_{12}-1_{01} (1669 GHz) ortho and 1_{11}-0_{00} (1113 GHz) para transitions of water in a cometary spectrum. In addition, the ground-state transition 1_{10}-1_{01} at 557 GHz is detected and mapped. By detecting several water lines quasi-simultaneously and mapping their emission we can constrain the excitation parameters in the coma. Synthetic line profiles are computed using excitation models which include excitation by collisions, solar infrared radiation, and radiation trapping. We obtain the gas kinetic temperature, constrain the electron density profile, and estimate the coma expansion velocity by analyzing the map and line shapes. We derive water production rates of 1.7-2.8 x 10^{28} s^{-1} over the range r_h = 1.83-1.85 AU.
  • In the classical flare picture, hard X-ray emission from the chromosphere is succeeded by soft-X-ray emission from hot plasma in the flare loop, the soft X-ray emission being a direct consequence of the impact of the non-thermal particle beam. However, observations of events exist in which a pronounced increase in soft X-ray emission is observed minutes before the onset of the hard X-ray emission. Such pre-flare emission clearly contradicts the classical flare picture. For the first time, the pre-flare phase of such solar flares is studied in detail. We want to explain the time evolution of the observed emission by means of alternative energy transport mechanisms such as heat conduction. RHESSI events displaying pronounced pre-flare emission were analyzed in imaging and spectroscopy. The pre-flare phase is characterized by purely thermal emission from a coronal source with increasing emission measure and density. After this earliest phase, a small non-thermal tail to higher energies appears in the spectra, becoming more and more pronounced. However, images still only display one X-ray source, implying that this non-thermal emission is coronal. The increase of emission measure and density indicates that material is added to the coronal region. The most plausible origin is evaporated material from the chromosphere. Energy provided by a heat flux is capable of driving chromospheric evaporation.
  • The energy input into the lower solar corona by flare evaporation events has been modeled according to the available observations for quiet regions. The question is addressed whether such heating events can provide the observed average level of the coronal emission measure and thus of the observed flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray emission without contradicting the observed average power spectrum of the emission measure, the typical emission measure variations observed for individual pixels and the observed flare energy distribution. As the assumed flare height influences the derived flare energy, the mathematical foundations of nanoflare distributions and their conversion to different height assumptions are studied first. This also allows a comparison with various published energy distributions differing in height assumptions and to relate the observations to the input parameters of the heating model. An analytic evaluation of the power spectrum yields the relationship between the average time profile of nanoflares (or microflares), assumed to be self-similar in energy, and the power spectrum. We find that the power spectrum is very sensitive to the chosen time profile of the flares. Models are found by numerical simulation that fit all available observations. They are not unique but severely constrained. We concentrate on a model with a flare height proportional to the square root of the flare area. The existence of a fitting model demonstrates that nanoflare heating of the corona is a viable and attractive mechanism.
  • Open-shutter RHESSI observations of 3-15 keV X-rays are found to exhibit active region transient brightenings and microflares at a rate of at least 10 per hour occurring even during the periods of lowest solar activity so far in the mission. A thermal component fitted by temperatures of 6-14 MK dominates from 3 keV to about 9 keV, but can be traced up to 14 keV in some cases, and has an average duration of 131(+-103) seconds at 7-8 keV. The duration increases with decreasing photon energy. The peak count rate defined by cross-correlation is delayed at low energies. The temperature peaks early in the event and then decreases, whereas the emission measure increases throughout the event. The properties are consistent with thermal conduction dominating the evolution. In some of the bigger events, a second component was found in the 11-14 keV range extending down to 8 keV in some cases. The duration is typically 3 times shorter and ends near the peak time of the thermal component consistent with the Neupert effect of regular flares. Therefore the second component is suggested to be of non-thermal origin, presumably causing the beam-driven evaporation of the first component. The two components can be separated and analyzed in detail for the first time. Low-keV measurements allow a reliable estimate of the energy input by microflares necessary to assess their relevance for coronal heating.
  • Decimetric radio observations of the impulsive solar flare on October 5, 1992, 09:25 UT show a long series of quasi-periodic pulsations deeply modulating a continuum in the 0.6-2 GHz range that is slowly drifting toward lower frequencies. We propose a model in which the pulsations of the radio flux are caused by quasi-periodic particle acceleration episodes that result from a dynamic phase of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale current sheet. The reconnection is dominated by repeated formation and subsequent coalescence of magnetic islands (known as ``secondary tearing'' or ``impulsive bursty'' regime of reconnection), while a continuously growing plasmoid is fed by newly coalescing islands. Such a model, involving a current sheet and a growing plasmoid, is consistent with the Yohkoh observations of the same flare (Ohyama & Shibata 1998). We present two-dimensional MHD simulations of dynamic magnetic reconnection that support the model. Within the framework of the proposed interpretation, the radio observations reveal details of plasmoid formation in flares.