• A theoretical analysis of the unfolding pathway of simple modular proteins in length- controlled pulling experiments is put forward. Within this framework, we predict the first module to unfold in a chain of identical units, emphasizing the ranges of pulling speeds in which we expect our theory to hold. These theoretical predictions are checked by means of steered molecular dynamics of a simple construct, specifically a chain composed of two coiled-coils motives, where anisotropic features are revealed. These simulations also allow us to give an estimate for the range of pulling velocities in which our theoretical approach is valid.
  • We analyze a one-dimensional spin-string model, in which string oscillators are linearly coupled to their two nearest neighbors and to Ising spins representing internal degrees of freedom. String-spin coupling induces a long-range ferromagnetic interaction among spins that competes with a spin-spin antiferromagnetic coupling. As a consequence, the complex phase diagram of the system exhibits different flat rippled and buckled states, with first or second order transition lines between states. The two-dimensional version of the model has a similar phase diagram, which has been recently used to explain the rippled to buckled transition observed in scanning tunnelling microscopy experiments with suspended graphene sheets. Here we describe in detail the phase diagram of the simpler one-dimensional model and phase stability using bifurcation theory. This gives additional insight into the physical mechanisms underlying the different phases and the behavior observed in experiments.
  • In kinetic theory, a system is usually described by its one-particle distribution function $f(\mathbf{r},\mathbf{v},t)$, such that $f(\mathbf{r},\mathbf{v},t)d\mathbf{r} d\mathbf{v}$ is the fraction of particles with positions and velocities in the intervals $(\mathbf{r}, \mathbf{r}+d\mathbf{r})$ and $(\mathbf{v}, \mathbf{v}+d\mathbf{v})$, respectively. Therein, global stability and the possible existence of an associated Lyapunov function or $H$-theorem are open problems when non-conservative interactions are present, as in granular fluids. Here, we address this issue in the framework of a lattice model for granular-like velocity fields. For a quite general driving mechanism, including both boundary and bulk driving, we show that the steady state reached by the system in the long time limit is globally stable. This is done by proving analytically that a certain $H$-functional is non-increasing in the long time limit. Moreover, for two specific energy injection mechanisms, we are able to demonstrate that the proposed $H$-functional is non-increasing for all times. Also, we put forward a proof that clearly illustrates why the "classical" Boltzmann functional $H_{B}[f]=\int\! d\mathbf{r} \, d\mathbf{v} f(\mathbf{r},\mathbf{v},t) \ln f(\mathbf{r},\mathbf{v},t)$ is inadequate for systems with non-conservative interactions. Not only is this done for the simplified kinetic description that holds in the lattice models analysed here but also for a general kinetic equation, like Boltzmann's or Enskog's.
  • We comment on the paper "Critique and correction of the currently accepted solution of the infinite spherical well in quantum mechanics" by Huang Young-Sea and Thomann Hans-Rudolph, EPL 115, 60001 (2016) .
  • Long-range spatial correlations in the velocity and energy fields of a granular fluid are discussed in the framework of a 1d lattice model. The dynamics of the velocity field occurs through nearest-neighbour inelastic collisions that conserve momentum but dissipate energy. A set of equations for the fluctuating hydrodynamics of the velocity and energy mesoscopic fields give a first approximation for (i) the velocity structure factor and (ii) the finite-size correction to the Haff law, both in the homogeneous cooling regime. At a more refined level, we have derived the equations for the two-site velocity correlations and the total energy fluctuations. First, we seek a perturbative solution thereof, in powers of the inverse of system size. On the one hand, when scaled with the granular temperature, the velocity correlations tend to a stationary value in the long time limit. On the other hand, the scaled standard deviation of the total energy diverges, that is, the system shows multiscaling. Second, we find an exact solution for the velocity correlations in terms of the spectrum of eigenvalues of a certain matrix. The results of numerical simulations of the microscopic model confirm our theoretical results, including the above described multiscaling phenomenon.
  • Understanding the physics of non-equilibrium systems remains as one of the major open questions in statistical physics. This problem can be partially handled by investigating macroscopic fluctuations of key magnitudes that characterise the non-equilibrium behaviour of the system of interest; their statistics, associated structures and microscopic origin. During the last years, some new general and powerful methods have appeared to delve into fluctuating behaviour that have drastically changed the way to address this problem in the realm of diffusive systems: macroscopic fluctuation theory (MFT) and a set of advanced computational techniques that make it possible to measure the probability of rare events. Notwithstanding, a satisfactory theory is still lacking in a particular case of intrinsically non-equilibrium systems, namely those in which energy is not conserved but dissipated continuously in the bulk of the system (e.g. granular media). In this work, we put forward the dissipated energy as a relevant quantity in this case and analyse in a pedagogical way its fluctuations, by making use of a suitable generalisation of macroscopic fluctuation theory to driven dissipative media.
  • We introduce a model described in terms of a scalar velocity field on a 1d lattice, evolving through collisions that conserve momentum but do not conserve energy. Such a system posseses some of the main ingredients of fluidized granular media and naturally models them. We deduce non-linear fluctuating hydrodynamics equations for the macroscopic velocity and temperature fields, which replicate the hydrody- namics of shear modes in a granular fluid. Moreover, this Landau-like fluctuating hydrodynamics predicts an essential part of the peculiar behaviour of granular flu- ids, like the instability of homogeneous cooling state at large size or inelasticity. We compute also the exact shape of long range spatial correlations which, even far from the instability, have the physical consequence of noticeably modifying the cooling rate. This effect, which stems from momentum conservation, has not been previously reported in the realm of granular fluids.
  • The dependence of the unfolding pathway of proteins on the pulling speed is investigated. This is done by introducing a simple one-dimensional chain comprising $N$ units, with different characteristic bistable free energies. These units represent either each of the modules in a modular protein or each of the intermediate "unfoldons" in a protein domain, which can be either folded or unfolded. The system is pulled by applying a force to the last unit of the chain, and the units unravel following a preferred sequence. We show that the unfolding sequence strongly depends on the pulling velocity $v_{p}$. In the simplest situation, there appears a critical pulling speed $v_{c}$: for pulling speeds $v_{p}<v_{c}$, the weakest unit unfolds first, whereas for $v_{p}>v_{c}$ it is the pulled unit that unfolds first. By means of a perturbative expansion, we find quite an accurate expression for this critical velocity.
  • We study a model describing the force-extension curves of modular proteins, nucleic acids, and other biomolecules made out of several single units or modules. At a mesoscopic level of description, the configuration of the system is given by the elongations of each of the units. The system free energy includes a double-well potential for each unit and an elastic nearest neighbor interaction between them. Minimizing the free energy yields the system equilibrium properties whereas its dynamics is given by (overdamped) Langevin equations for the elongations, in which friction and noise amplitude are related by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Our results, both for the equilibrium and the dynamical situations, include analytical and numerical descriptions of the system force-extension curves under force or length control, and agree very well with actual experiments in biomolecules. Our conclusions also apply to other physical systems comprising a number of metastable units, such as storage systems or semiconductor superlattices.
  • Single-molecule atomic force spectroscopy probes elastic properties of titin, ubiquitin and other relevant proteins. We explain bioprotein folding dynamics under both length- and force-clamp by modeling polyprotein modules as particles in a bistable potential, weakly connected by harmonic spring linkers. Multistability of equilibrium extensions provides the characteristic sawtooth force-extension curve. We show that abrupt or stepwise unfolding and refolding under force-clamp conditions involve transitions through virtual states (which are quasi-stationary domain configurations) modified by thermal noise. These predictions agree with experimental observations.
  • We evidence a Kovacs-like memory effect in a uniformly driven granular gas. A system of inelastic hard particles, in the low density limit, can reach a non-equilibrium steady state when properly forced. By following a certain protocol for the drive time dependence, we prepare the gas in a state where the granular temperature coincides with its long time value. The temperature subsequently does not remain constant, but exhibits a non-monotonic evolution with either a maximum or a minimum, depending on the dissipation, and on the protocol. We present a theoretical analysis of this memory effect, at Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck equation level, and show that when dissipation exceeds a threshold, the response can be coined anomalous. We find an excellent agreement between the analytical predictions and direct Monte Carlo simulations.
  • While memory effects have been reported for dense enough disordered systems such as glasses, we show here by a combination of analytical and simulation techniques that they are also intrinsic to the dynamics of dilute granular gases. By means of a certain driving protocol, we prepare the gas in a state where the granular temperature $T$ coincides with its long time limit. However, $T$ does not subsequently remain constant, but exhibits a non-monotonic evolution before reaching its non-equilibrium steady value. The corresponding so-called Kovacs hump displays a normal behavior for weak dissipation (as observed in molecular systems), but is reversed under strong dissipation, where it thus becomes anomalous.
  • We analyze the so-called Kovacs effect in the one-dimensional Ising model with Glauber dynamics. We consider small enough temperature jumps, for which a linear response theory has been recently derived. Within this theory, the Kovacs hump is directly related to the monotonic relaxation function of the energy. The analytical results are compared with extensive Monte Carlo simulations, and an excellent agreement is found. Remarkably, the position of the maximum in the Kovacs hump depends on the fact that the true asymptotic behavior of the relaxation function is different from the stretched exponential describing the relevant part of the relaxation at low temperatures.
  • We analyze the force-extension curve for a general class of systems, which are described at the mesoscopic level by a free energy depending on the extension of its components. Similarly to what is done in real experiments, the total length of the system is the controlled parameter. This imposes a global constraint in the minimization procedure leading to the equilibrium values of the extensions. As a consequence, the force-extension curve has multiple branches in a certain range of forces. The stability of these branches is governed by the free energy: there are a series of first-order phase transitions at certain values of the total length, in which the free energy itself is continuous but its first derivative, the force, has a finite jump. This behavior is completely similar to the one observed in real experiments with biomolecules like proteins, and other complex systems.
  • We consider fluctuations of the dissipated energy in nonlinear driven diffusive systems subject to bulk dissipation and boundary driving. With this aim, we extend the recently-introduced macroscopic fluctuation theory to nonlinear driven dissipative media, starting from the fluctuating hydrodynamic equations describing the system mesoscopic evolution. Interestingly, the action associated to a path in mesoscopic phase-space, from which large-deviation functions for macroscopic observables can be derived, has the same simple form as in non-dissipative systems. This is a consequence of the quasi-elasticity of microscopic dynamics, required in order to have a nontrivial competition between diffusion and dissipation at the mesoscale. Euler-Lagrange equations for the optimal density and current fields that sustain an arbitrary dissipation fluctuation are also derived. A perturbative solution thereof shows that the probability distribution of small fluctuations is always gaussian, as expected from the central limit theorem. On the other hand, strong separation from the gaussian behavior is observed for large fluctuations, with a distribution which shows no negative branch, thus violating the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem as expected from the irreversibility of the dynamics. The dissipation large-deviation function exhibits simple and general scaling forms for weakly and strongly dissipative systems, with large fluctuations favored in the former case but heavily supressed in the latter. (...) [see complete abstract by downloading the paper]
  • We consider a general class of nonlinear diffusive models with bulk dissipation and boundary driving, and derive its hydrodynamic description in the large size limit. Both the average macroscopic behavior and the fluctuating properties of the hydrodynamic fields are obtained from the microscopic dynamics. This analysis yields a fluctuating balance equation for the local energy density at the mesoscopic level, characterized by two terms: (i) a diffusive term, with a current that fluctuates around its average behavior given by nonlinear Fourier's law, and (ii) a dissipation term which is a general function of the local energy density. The quasi-elasticity of microscopic dynamics, required in order to have a nontrivial competition between diffusion and dissipation in the macroscopic limit, implies a noiseless dissipation term in the balance equation, so dissipation fluctuations are enslaved to those of the density field. The microscopic complexity is thus condensed in just three transport coefficients, the diffusivity, the mobility and a new dissipation coefficient, which are explicitly calculated within a local equilibrium approximation. Interestingly, the diffusivity and mobility coefficients obey an Einstein relation despite the fully nonequilibrium character of the problem. The general theory here presented is applied to a particular albeit broad family of systems, the simplest nonlinear dissipative variant of the so-called KMP model for heat transport. The theoretical predictions are compared to extensive numerical simulations, and an excellent agreement is found.
  • We model unzipping of DNA/RNA molecules subject to an external force by a spin-oscillator system. The system comprises a macroscopic degree of freedom, represented by a one-dimensional oscillator, and internal degrees of freedom, represented by Glauber spins with nearest-neighbor interaction and a coupling constant proportional to the oscillator position. At a critical value $F_c$ of an applied external force $F$, the oscillator rest position (order parameter) changes abruptly and the system undergoes a first-order phase transition. When the external force is cycled at different rates, the extension given by the oscillator position exhibits a hysteresis cycle at high loading rates whereas it moves reversibly over the equilibrium force-extension curve at very low loading rates. Under constant force, the logarithm of the residence time at the stable and metastable oscillator rest position is proportional to $(F-F_c)$ as in an Arrhenius law.
  • We analyze the fluctuations of the dissipated energy in a simple and general model where dissipation, diffusion and driving are the key ingredients. The large deviation function for the dissipation follows from hydrodynamic fluctuation theory and an additivity conjecture. This function is strongly non-Gaussian and has no negative branch, thus violating the fluctuation theorem as expected from the irreversibility of the dynamics. It exhibits simple, universal scaling forms in the weak- and strong-dissipation limits, with large fluctuations favoured in the former case but strongly suppressed in the latter. The typical path associated to a given dissipation fluctuation is also analyzed in detail. Our results, confirmed in extensive simulations, strongly support the validity of hydrodynamic fluctuation theory to describe fluctuating behavior in driven dissipative media.
  • We investigate an oscillator linearly coupled with a one-dimensional Ising system. The coupling gives rise to drastic changes both in the oscillator statics and dynamics. Firstly, there appears a second order phase transition, with the oscillator stable rest position as its order parameter. Secondly, for fast spins, the oscillator dynamics is described by an effective equation with a nonlinear friction term that drives the oscillator towards the stable equilibrium state.
  • A fast harmonic oscillator is linearly coupled with a system of Ising spins that are in contact with a thermal bath, and evolve under a slow Glauber dynamics at dimensionless temperature $\theta$. The spins have a coupling constant proportional to the oscillator position. The oscillator-spin interaction produces a second order phase transition at $\theta=1$ with the oscillator position as its order parameter: the equilibrium position is zero for $\theta>1$ and non-zero for $\theta< 1$. For $\theta<1$, the dynamics of this system is quite different from relaxation to equilibrium. For most initial conditions, the oscillator position performs modulated oscillations about one of the stable equilibrium positions with a long relaxation time. For random initial conditions and a sufficiently large spin system, the unstable zero position of the oscillator is stabilized after a relaxation time proportional to $\theta$. If the spin system is smaller, the situation is the same until the oscillator position is close to zero, then it crosses over to a neighborhood of a stable equilibrium position about which keeps oscillating for an exponentially long relaxation time. These results of stochastic simulations are predicted by modulation equations obtained from a multiple scale analysis of macroscopic equations.
  • A harmonic oscillator linearly coupled with a linear chain of Ising spins is investigated. The $N$ spins in the chain interact with their nearest neighbours with a coupling constant proportional to the oscillator position and to $N^{-1/2}$, are in contact with a thermal bath at temperature $T$, and evolve under Glauber dynamics. The oscillator position is a stochastic process due to the oscillator-spin interaction which produces drastic changes in the equilibrium behaviour and the dynamics of the oscillator. Firstly, there is a second order phase transition at a critical temperature $T_c$ whose order parameter is the oscillator stable rest position: this position is zero above $T_c$ and different from zero below $T_c$. This transition appears because the oscillator moves in an effective potential equal to the harmonic term plus the free energy of the spin system at fixed oscillator position. Secondly, assuming fast spin relaxation (compared to the oscillator natural period), the oscillator dynamical behaviour is described by an effective equation containing a nonlinear friction term that drives the oscillator towards the stable equilibrium state of the effective potential. The analytical results are compared with numerical simulation throughout the paper.
  • The Kovacs or crossover effect is one of the peculiar behaviours exhibited by glasses and other complex, slowly relaxing systems. Roughly it consists in the non-monotonic relaxation to its equilibrium value of a macroscopic property of a system evolving at constant temperature, when starting from a non-equilibrium state. Here, this effect is investigated for general systems whose dynamics is described by a master equation. To carry out a detailed analysis, the limit of small perturbations in which linear response theory applies is considered. It is shown that, under very general conditions, the observed experimental features of the Kovacs effect are recovered. The results are particularized for a very simple model, a two-level system with dynamical disorder. An explicit analytical expression for its non-monotonic relaxation function is obtained, showing a resonant-like behaviour when the dependence on the temperature is investigated.
  • The presence of the aging phenomenon in the homogeneous cooling state (HCS) of a granular fluid composed of inelastic hard spheres or disks is investigated. As a consequence of the scaling property of the $N$-particle distribution function, it is obtained that the decay of the normalized two-time correlation functions slows down as the time elapsed since the beginning of the measurement increases. This result is confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations for the particular case of the total energy of the system. The agreement is also quantitative in the low density limit, for which an explicit analytical form of the time correlation function has been derived. The reported results also provide support for the existence of the HCS as a solution of the N-particle Liouville equation.
  • By means of a simple model system, the total volume fluctuations of a tapped granular material in the steady state are studied. In the limit of a system with a large number of particles, they are found to be Gaussian distributed, and explicit expressions for the average and the variance are provided. Experimental and molecular dynamics results are analyzed and qualitatively compared with the model predictions. The relevance of considering open or closed systems is discussed, as well as the meaning and properties of the Edwards compactivity and the effective (configurational) temperature introduced by some authors. Finally, the linear response to a change in the vibration intensity is also investigated. A KWW decay of the volume response function is clearly identified. This seems to confirm some kind of similarity between externally excited granular systems and structural glasses.
  • A model for the adsorption of a binary mixture on a one-dimensional infinite lattice with nearest neighbour cooperative effects is considered. The particles of the two species are both monomers but differ in the repulsive interaction experienced by them when trying to adsorb. An exact expression for the coverage of the lattice is derived. In the jamming limit, it is a monotonic function of the ratio between the attempt frequencies of the two species, varying between the values corresponding to each of the two single species. This is in contrast with the results obtained in other models for the adsorption of particles of different sizes. The structure of the jamming state is also investigated.