• We update our previous search for trapped magnetic monopoles in LHC Run 2 using nearly six times more integrated luminosity and including additional models for the interpretation of the data. The MoEDAL forward trapping detector, comprising 222~kg of aluminium samples, was exposed to 2.11~fb$^{-1}$ of 13 TeV proton-proton collisions near the LHCb interaction point and analysed by searching for induced persistent currents after passage through a superconducting magnetometer. Magnetic charges equal to the Dirac charge or above are excluded in all samples. The results are interpreted in Drell-Yan production models for monopoles with spins 0, 1/2 and 1: in addition to standard point-like couplings, we also consider couplings with momentum-dependent form factors. The search provides the best current laboratory constraints for monopoles with magnetic charges ranging from two to five times the Dirac charge.
  • MoEDAL is designed to identify new physics in the form of long-lived highly-ionising particles produced in high-energy LHC collisions. Its arrays of plastic nuclear-track detectors and aluminium trapping volumes provide two independent passive detection techniques. We present here the results of a first search for magnetic monopole production in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions using the trapping technique, extending a previous publication with 8 TeV data during LHC run-1. A total of 222 kg of MoEDAL trapping detector samples was exposed in the forward region and analysed by searching for induced persistent currents after passage through a superconducting magnetometer. Magnetic charges exceeding half the Dirac charge are excluded in all samples and limits are placed for the first time on the production of magnetic monopoles in 13 TeV $pp$ collisions. The search probes mass ranges previously inaccessible to collider experiments for up to five times the Dirac charge.
  • The MoEDAL experiment is designed to search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising particles produced in high-energy collisions at the LHC. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Interaction Point 8 on the LHC ring, relies on two dedicated direct detection techniques. The first technique is based on stacks of nuclear-track detectors with surface area $\sim$18 m$^2$, sensitive to particle ionisation exceeding a high threshold. These detectors are analysed offline by optical scanning microscopes. The second technique is based on the trapping of charged particles in an array of roughly 800 kg of aluminium samples. These samples are monitored offline for the presence of trapped magnetic charge at a remote superconducting magnetometer facility. We present here the results of a search for magnetic monopoles using a 160 kg prototype MoEDAL trapping detector exposed to 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC, for an integrated luminosity of 0.75 fb$^{-1}$. No magnetic charge exceeding $0.5g_{\rm D}$ (where $g_{\rm D}$ is the Dirac magnetic charge) is measured in any of the exposed samples, allowing limits to be placed on monopole production in the mass range 100 GeV$\leq m \leq$ 3500 GeV. Model-independent cross-section limits are presented in fiducial regions of monopole energy and direction for $1g_{\rm D}\leq|g|\leq 6g_{\rm D}$, and model-dependent cross-section limits are obtained for Drell-Yan pair production of spin-1/2 and spin-0 monopoles for $1g_{\rm D}\leq|g|\leq 4g_{\rm D}$. Under the assumption of Drell-Yan cross sections, mass limits are derived for $|g|=2g_{\rm D}$ and $|g|=3g_{\rm D}$ for the first time at the LHC, surpassing the results from previous collider experiments.
  • The MoEDAL experiment at Point 8 of the LHC ring is the seventh and newest LHC experiment. It is dedicated to the search for highly ionizing particle avatars of physics beyond the Standard Model, extending significantly the discovery horizon of the LHC. A MoEDAL discovery would have revolutionary implications for our fundamental understanding of the Microcosm. MoEDAL is an unconventional and largely passive LHC detector comprised of the largest array of Nuclear Track Detector stacks ever deployed at an accelerator, surrounding the intersection region at Point 8 on the LHC ring. Another novel feature is the use of paramagnetic trapping volumes to capture both electrically and magnetically charged highly-ionizing particles predicted in new physics scenarios. It includes an array of TimePix pixel devices for monitoring highly-ionizing particle backgrounds. The main passive elements of the MoEDAL detector do not require a trigger system, electronic readout, or online computerized data acquisition. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the MoEDAL physics reach, which is largely complementary to the programs of the large multi-purpose LHC detectors ATLAS and CMS.
  • We investigate twisted C-periodic boundary conditions in SU(N) gauge field theory with an adjoint Higgs field. We show that with a suitable twist for even N one can impose a non-zero magnetic charge relative to residual U(1) gauge groups in the broken phase, thereby creating a 't Hooft-Polyakov magnetic monopole. This makes it possible to use lattice Monte-Carlo simulations to study the properties of these monopoles in the quantum theory.
  • We argue that cosmic strings with high winding numbers generally form in first-order gauge symmetry breaking phase transitions, and we demonstrate this using computer simulations. These strings are heavier than single-winding strings and therefore more easily observable. Their cosmological evolution may also be very different.
  • The quantum mechanical mass of 't Hooft-Polyakov monopoles in the four-dimensional Georgi-Glashow is calculated non-perturbatively using lattice Monte Carlo simulations. This is done by imposing twisted boundary conditions that ensure there is one unit of magnetic charge on the lattice, and measuring the free energy difference between this ensemble and the vacuum. In the weak-coupling limit, the results can be used to determine the quantum correction to the classical mass, once renormalisation of couplings is taken properly into account. The methods can also be used to study the masses at strong coupling, i.e., near the critical point, where there are hints of a possible electric-magnetic duality.
  • We investigate the end of the inflationary period in the recently proposed scenario of locked inflation, and consider various constraints arising from density perturbations, loop corrections, parametric resonance and defect formation. We show that in a scenario where there is one long period of locked inflation, it is not possible to satisfy all of these constraints without having a period of saddle inflation afterwards, which would wipe out all observable signatures. On the other hand, if one does not insist on satisfying the loop correction constraint, saddle inflation can be avoided, but then inflation must have ended through parametric resonance.
  • We carry out numerical simulations to investigate spontaneous vortex formation during a temperature quench of a superconductor film from the normal to the superconducting phase in the absence of an external magnetic field. Our results agree roughly with quantitative predictions of the flux trapping scenario: In fast quenches the agreement is almost perfect, but there appears to be some discrepancy in slower ones. In particular, our simulations demonstrate the crucial role the electromagnetic field plays in this phenomenon, making it very different from vortex formation in superfluids. Besides superconductor experiments, our findings also shed more light on the possible formation of cosmic defects in the early universe.
  • When hot quark gluon plasma expands and cools down after an heavy ion collision, charge conservation leads to non-trivial correlations between the charge densities at different rapidities. If these correlations can be measured, they will provide information about dynamical properties of quark gluon plasma.
  • Three-dimensional scalar electrodynamics, with a local U(1) gauge symmetry, is believed to be dual to a scalar theory with a global U(1) symmetry, near the phase transition point. The conjectured duality leads to definite predictions for the scaling exponents of the gauge theory transition in the type II region, and allows thus to be scrutinized empirically. We review these predictions, and carry out numerical lattice Monte Carlo measurements to test them: a number of exponents, characterising the two phases as well as the transition point, are found to agree with expectations, supporting the conjecture. We explain why some others, like the exponent characterising the photon correlation length, appear to disagree with expectations, unless very large system sizes and the extreme vicinity of the transition point are considered. Finally, we remark that in the type I region the duality implies an interesting quantitative relationship between a magnetic flux tube and a 2-dimensional non-topological soliton.
  • Topological defects are common in many everyday systems. In general, they appear if a symmetry is broken at a rapid phase transition. In this article, I explain why it is believed that they should have also been formed in the early universe and how that would have happened. If topological defects are found, this will provide a way to study observationally the first fractions of a second after the Big Bang, but their apparent absence can also tell us many things about the early universe.
  • Thermal fluctuations of the gauge field lead to monopole formation at the grand unified phase transition in the early Universe, even if the transition is merely a smooth crossover. The dependence of the produced monopole density on various parameters is qualitatively different from theories with global symmetries, and the monopoles have a positive correlation at short distances. The number density of monopoles may be suppressed if the grand unified symmetry is only restored for a short time by, for instance, nonthermal symmetry restoration after preheating.
  • The three-dimensional integer-valued lattice gauge theory, which is also known as a "frozen superconductor," can be obtained as a certain limit of the Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity, and is believed to be in the same universality class. It is also exactly dual to the three-dimensional XY model. We use this duality to demonstrate the practicality of recently developed methods for studying topological defects, and investigate the critical behavior of the phase transition using numerical Monte Carlo simulations of both theories. On the gauge theory side, we concentrate on the vortex tension and the penetration depth, which map onto the correlation lengths of the order parameter and the Noether current in the XY model, respectively. We show how these quantities behave near the critical point, and that the penetration depth exhibits critical scaling only very close to the transition point. This may explain the failure of superconductor experiments to see the inverted XY model scaling.
  • In the first one of these two lectures, I give an introductory review of phase transitions in finite temperature field theories. I highlight the differences between theories with global and local symmetries, and the similarities between cosmological phase transitions and phase transitions in superconductors. In the second one, I review the theory of defect formation in finite temperature phase transitions, emphasising the differences between systems with broken global and local symmetries. These same principles apply to relativistic and condensed matter systems alike.
  • This paper addresses the problem of vortex formation during a rapid quench in a superconducting film. It builds on previous work showing that in a local gauge theory there are two distinct mechanisms of defect formation, based on fluctuations of the scalar and gauge fields, respectively. We show how vortex formation in a thin film differs from the fully two-dimensional case, on which most theoretical studies have focused. We discuss ways of testing theoretical predictions in superconductor experiments and analyse the results of recent experiments in this light.
  • In this talk, I discuss the formation of magnetic monopoles in a phase transition from the confining SU(2) phase to the Coulomb phase in a hot Georgi-Glashow model. I argue that monopoles are formed from long-wavelength thermal fluctuations, which freeze out after the phase transition.
  • We study the three-dimensional Georgi-Glashow model to demonstrate how magnetic monopoles can be studied fully non-perturbatively in lattice Monte Carlo simulations, without any assumptions about the smoothness of the field configurations. We examine the apparent contradiction between the conjectured analytic connection of the `broken' and `symmetric' phases, and the interpretation of the mass (i.e., the free energy) of the fully quantised 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole as an order parameter to distinguish the phases. We use Monte Carlo simulations to measure the monopole free energy and its first derivative with respect to the scalar mass. On small volumes we compare this to semi-classical predictions for the monopole. On large volumes we show that the free energy is screened to zero, signalling the formation of a confining monopole condensate. This screening does not allow the monopole mass to be interpreted as an order parameter, resolving the paradox.
  • We study the instability of a scalar field at the end of hybrid inflation, using both analytical techniques and numerical simulations. We improve previous studies by taking the inflaton field fully into account, and show that the range of unstable modes depends sensitively on the velocity of the inflaton field, and thereby on the Hubble rate, at the end of inflation. If topological defects are formed, their number density is determined by the shortest unstable wavelength. Finally, we show that the oscillations of the inflaton field amplify the inhomogeneities in the energy density, leading to local symmetry restoration and faster thermalization. We believe this explains why tachyonic preheating is so effective in transferring energy away from the inflaton zero mode.
  • When a symmetry gets spontaneously broken in a phase transition, topological defects are typically formed. The theoretical picture of how this happens in a breakdown of a global symmetry, the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, is well established and has been tested in various condensed matter experiments. However, from the viewpoint of particle physics and cosmology, gauge field theories are more relevant than global theories. In recent years, there have been significant advances in the theory of defect formation in gauge field theories, which make precise predictions possible, and in experimental techniques that can be used to test these predictions in superconductor experiments. This opens up the possibility of carrying out relatively simple and controlled experiments, in which the non-equilibrium phase transition dynamics of gauge field theories can be studied. This will have a significant impact on our understanding of phase transitions in the early universe and in heavy ion collider experiments. In this paper, I review the current status of the theory and the experiments in which it can be tested.
  • We study the critical behaviour of the three-dimensional U(1) gauge+Higgs theory (Ginzburg-Landau model) at large scalar self-coupling \lambda (``type II region'') by measuring various correlation lengths as well as the Abrikosov-Nielsen-Olesen vortex tension. We identify different scaling regions as the transition is approached from below, and carry out detailed comparisons with the criticality of the 3d O(2) symmetric scalar theory.
  • In many inflationary models, a large amount of energy is transferred rapidly to the long-wavelength matter fields during a period of preheating after inflation. We study how this changes the dynamics of the electroweak phase transition if inflation ends at the electroweak scale. We simulate a classical SU(2)xU(1)+Higgs model with initial conditions in which the energy is concentrated in the long-wavelength Higgs modes. With a suitable initial energy density, the electroweak symmetry is restored non-thermally but broken again when the fields thermalize. During this symmetry restoration, baryon number is violated, and we measure its time evolution, pointing out that it is highly non-Brownian. This makes it difficult to estimate the generated baryon asymmetry.
  • We present a detailed numerical study of the equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics of the phase transition in the finite-temperature Abelian Higgs model. Our simulations use classical equations of motion both with and without hard-thermal-loop corrections, which take into account the leading quantum effects. From the equilibrium real-time correlators, we determine the Landau damping rate, the plasmon frequency and the plasmon damping rate. We also find that, close to the phase transition, the static magnetic field correlator shows power-law magnetic screening at long distances. The information about the damping rates allows us to derive a quantitative prediction for the number density of topological defects formed in a phase transition. We test this prediction in a non-equilibrium simulation and show that the relevant time scale for defect formation is given by the Landau damping rate.
  • In superconductors, and in other systems with a local U(1) gauge invariance, there are two mechanisms that form topological defects in phase transitions. In addition to the standard Kibble mechanism, thermal fluctuations of the magnetic field also lead to defect formation. This mechanism is specific to local gauge theories, predicts a qualitatively different spatial defect distribution and is the dominant source for topological defects in slow transitions. I review the arguments that lead to these conclusions and discuss possibilities of testing the scenario in superconductor experiments.
  • We present a non-perturbative formalism for measuring defect free energies (monopole mass or vortex tension) in three-dimensional SU(2)+adjoint Higgs models. Starting from twisted, translation invariant boundary conditions, we perform a change of variables that allows us to express the defect free energies in terms of 't Hooft loops. We propose that the defect free energies can be used to distinguish between phases in this model, and also more generally in other gauge field theories where no local order parameters exist. In the case of monopoles, our construction can also be used in four-dimensional pure-gauge SU(2) theory, where it gives the monopole mass in the maximally Abelian gauge without the need of actually fixing the gauge in the simulation. Moreover, the expression is manifestly independent of the choice of the Abelian projection as long as it is compatible with the classical 't Hooft-Polyakov solution.