• The historic first joint detection of both gravitational wave and electromagnetic emission from a binary neutron star merger cemented the association between short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) and compact object mergers, as well as providing a well sampled multi-wavelength light curve of a radioactive kilonova (KN) for the first time. Here we compare the optical and near-infrared light curves of this KN, AT2017gfo, to the counterparts of a sample of nearby (z < 0.5) SGRBs to characterize their diversity in terms of their brightness distribution. Although at similar epochs AT2017gfo appears fainter than every SGRB-associated KN claimed so far, we find three bursts (GRBs 050509B, 061201 and 080905A) where, if the reported redshifts are correct, deep upper limits rule out the presence of a KN similar to AT2017gfo by several magnitudes. Combined with the properties of previously claimed KNe in SGRBs this suggests considerable diversity in the properties of KN drawn from compact object mergers, despite the similar physical conditions that are expected in many NS-NS mergers. We find that observer angle alone is not able to explain this diversity, which is likely a product of the merger type (NS-NS versus NS-BH) and the detailed properties of the binary (mass ratio, spins etc). Ultimately disentangling these properties should be possible through observations of SGRBs and gravitational wave sources, providing direct measurements of heavy element enrichment throughout the Universe.
  • The joint detection of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation from the binary neutron star (BNS) merger GW170817 has provided unprecedented insight into a wide range of physical processes: heavy element synthesis via the $r$-process; the production of relativistic ejecta; the equation of state of neutron stars and the nature of the merger remnant; the binary coalescence timescale; and a measurement of the Hubble constant via the "standard siren" technique. In detail, all of these results depend on the distance to the host galaxy of the merger event, NGC4993. In this paper we measure the surface brightness fluctuation (SBF) distance to NGC4993 in the F110W and F160W passbands of the Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared Channel on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). For the preferred F110W passband we derive a distance modulus of $m{-}M=33.05\pm0.08\pm0.10$ mag, or a linear distance $d=40.7\pm1.4\pm1.9$ Mpc (random and systematic errors, respectively); a virtually identical result is obtained from the F160W data. This is the most precise distance to NGC4993 available to date. Combining our distance measurement with the corrected recession velocity of NGC4993 implies a Hubble constant $H_0=71.9\pm 7.1~km~s^{-1}~Mpc^{-1}$. A comparison of our result to the GW-inferred value of $H_0$ indicates a binary orbital inclination of $i\,{\gtrsim}\,137~\deg$. The SBF technique can be applied to early-type host galaxies of BNS mergers to ${\sim\,}100$ Mpc with HST and possibly as far as ${\sim\,}300$ Mpc with the James Webb Space Telescope, thereby helping to break the inherent distance-inclination degeneracy of the GW signals at distances where many future BNS mergers are likely to be detected.
  • We analyze the properties of a sample of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) detected by the Fermi satellite that have a spectroscopic redshift and good follow-up coverage at both X-ray and optical/nIR wavelengths. The evolution of LGRB afterglows depends on the density profile of the external medium, enabling us to separate wind or ISM-like environments based on the observations. We do this by identifying the environment that provides the best agreement between estimates of $p$, the index of the underlying power-law distribution of electron energies, as determined by the behavior of the afterglow in different spectral/temporal regimes. At 11 rest-frame hours after trigger, we find a roughly even split between ISM-like and wind-like environments. We further find a 2$\sigma$ separation in the prompt emission energy distributions of wind-like and ISM-like bursts. We investigate the underlying physical parameters of the shock, and calculate the (degenerate) product of density and magnetic field energy ($\epsilon_B$). We show that $\epsilon_B$ must be $\ll 10^{-2}$ to avoid implied densities comparable to the intergalactic medium. Finally, we find that the most precisely constrained observations disagree on $p$ by more than would be expected based on observational errors alone. This suggests additional sources of error that are not incorporated in the standard afterglow theory. For the first time, we provide a measurement of this intrinsic error which can be represented as an error in the estimate of $p$ of magnitude $0.25 \pm 0.04$. When this error is included in the fits, the number of LGRBs with an identified environment drops substantially, but the equal division between the two types remains.
  • The binary neutron star merger GW170817 was the first multi-messenger event observed in both gravitational and electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic signal began ~ 2 seconds after the merger with a weak, short burst of gamma-rays, which was followed over the course of the next hours and days by the ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared emission from a radioactively-powered kilonova. The low luminosity of the gamma-rays and the rising radio and X-ray flux from the source at late times could indicate that we are viewing this event outside the opening angle of the beamed relativistic jet launched during the merger. Alternatively, the emission could be arising from a cocoon of material formed from the interaction between a (possibly choked) jet and the merger ejecta. Here we present late-time optical detections and deep near-infrared limits on the emission from GW170817 at 110 days after the merger. Our new observations are at odds with expectations of late-time emission from kilonova models, being too bright and blue. Instead, this late-time optical emission arises from the optical afterglow of GRB 170817A, associated with GW170817. This emission matches the expectations of a structured relativistic jet, that would have launched a high luminosity short GRB to an aligned observer. The distinct predictions for the future optical behaviour in the structured-jet and cocoon models will directly distinguish the origin of the emission.
  • We report the discovery and monitoring of the near-infrared counterpart (AT2017gfo) of a binary neutron-star merger event detected as a gravitational wave source by Advanced LIGO/Virgo (GW170817) and as a short gamma-ray burst by Fermi/GBM and Integral/SPI-ACS (GRB170817A). The evolution of the transient light is consistent with predictions for the behaviour of a "kilonova/macronova", powered by the radioactive decay of massive neutron-rich nuclides created via r-process nucleosynthesis in the neutron-star ejecta. In particular, evidence for this scenario is found from broad features seen in Hubble Space Telescope infrared spectroscopy, similar to those predicted for lanthanide dominated ejecta, and the much slower evolution in the near-infrared Ks-band compared to the optical. This indicates that the late-time light is dominated by high-opacity lanthanide-rich ejecta, suggesting nucleosynthesis to the 3rd r-process peak (atomic masses A~195). This discovery confirms that neutron-star mergers produce kilo-/macronovae and that they are at least a major - if not the dominant - site of rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis in the universe.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful probes of early stars and galaxies, during and potentially even before the era of reionization. Although the number of GRBs identified at z>6 remains small, they provide a unique window on typical star-forming galaxies at that time, and thus are complementary to deep field observations. We report the identification of the optical drop-out afterglow of Swift GRB 120923A in near-infrared Gemini-North imaging, and derive a redshift of z=7.84_{-0.12}^{+0.06} from VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy. At this redshift the peak 15-150 keV luminosity of the burst was 3.2x10^52 erg/s, and in fact the burst was close to the Swift/BAT detection threshold. The X-ray and near-infrared afterglow were also faint, and in this sense it was a rather typical long-duration GRB in terms of rest-frame luminosity. We present ground- and space-based follow-up observations spanning from X-ray to radio, and find that a standard external shock model with a constant-density circumburst environment with density, n~4x10^-2 cm^-3 gives a good fit to the data. The near-infrared light curve exhibits a sharp break at t~3.4 days in the observer frame, which if interpreted as being due to a jet corresponds to an opening angle of ~5 degrees. The beaming corrected gamma-ray energy is then E_gamma~2x10^50 erg, while the beaming-corrected kinetic energy is lower, E_K~10^49 erg, suggesting that GRB 120923A was a comparatively low kinetic energy event. We discuss the implications of this event for our understanding of the high-redshift population of GRBs and their identification.
  • Supernova 2011kl, associated with the ultra-long gamma-ray burst (ULGRB) 111209A, exhibited a higher-than-normal peak luminosity, placing it in the parameter space between regular supernovae and super-luminous supernovae. Its light curve can only be matched by an abnormally high fraction of $^{56}$Ni that appears inconsistent with the observed spectrum, and as a result it has been suggested that the supernova, and by extension the gamma-ray burst, are powered by the spin-down of a highly magnetised millisecond pulsar, known as a magnetar. We investigate the broadband observations of ULGRB 111209A, and find two independent measures that suggest a high density circumburst environment. However, the light curve of the GRB afterglow shows no evidence of a jet break (the steep decline that would be expected as the jet slows due to the resistance of the external medium) out to three weeks after trigger, implying a wide jet. Combined with the high isotropic energy of the burst, this implies that only a magnetar with a spin period of ~ 1 ms or faster can provide enough energy to power both ULGRB 111209A and Supernova 2011kl.
  • We present the Palomar Transient Factory discoveries and the photometric and spectroscopic observations of PTF11kmb and PTF12bho. We show that both transients have properties consistent with the class of calcium-rich gap transients, specifically lower peak luminosities and rapid evolution compared to ordinary supernovae, and a nebular spectrum dominated by [Ca II] emission. A striking feature of both transients is their host environments: PTF12bho is an intra-cluster transient in the Coma Cluster, while PTF11kmb is located in a loose galaxy group, at a physical offset ~150 kpc from the most likely host galaxy. Deep Subaru imaging of PTF12bho rules out an underlying host system to a limit of $M_R > -8.0$ mag, while Hubble Space Telescope imaging of PTF11kmb reveals a marginal counterpart that, if real, could be either a background galaxy or a globular cluster. We show that the offset distribution of Ca-rich gap transients is significantly more extreme than that seen for Type Ia supernovae or even short-hard gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Thus, if the offsets are caused by a kick, they require larger kick velocities and/or longer merger times than sGRBs. We also show that almost all Ca-rich gap transients found to date are in group and cluster environments with elliptical host galaxies, indicating a very old progenitor population; the remote locations could partially be explained by these environments having the largest fraction of stars in the intra-group/intra-cluster light following galaxy-galaxy interactions.
  • There is now strong evidence that Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) are preferentially formed in low-metallicity environments. However, the magnitude of this effect, and its functional dependence on metallicity have not been well characterized. In our previous paper, Graham & Fruchter (2013), we compared the metallicity distribution of LGRB host galaxies to the that of star forming galaxies in the local universe. Here we build upon this work by in effect dividing one distribution by the other, and thus directly determine the relative rate of LGRB formation as a function of metallicity in the low-redshift universe. We find a dramatic cutoff in LGRB formation above a metallicity of log(O/H)}+12 ~ 8.3 in the KK04 scale, with LGRBs forming between ten and fifty times more frequently per unit star-formation below this cutoff than above. Furthermore, our data suggests that the rate of LGRB formation per unit star formation continues to fall above this break. We estimate the LGRB formation rate per unit star formation may drop by as much as a factor of one hundred between one-third solar and solar metallicity.
  • Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) allow us to pinpoint and study star-forming galaxies in the early universe, thanks to their orders of magnitude brighter peak luminosities compared to other astrophysical sources, and their association with deaths of massive stars. We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 detections of three Swift GRB host galaxies lying at redshifts $z = 5.913$ (GRB 130606A), $z = 6.295$ (GRB 050904), and $z = 6.327$ (GRB 140515A) in the F140W (wide-$JH$ band, $\lambda_{\rm{obs}}\sim1.4\,\mu m$) filter. The hosts have magnitudes (corrected for Galactic extinction) of $m_{\rm{\lambda_{obs},AB}}= 26.34^{+0.14}_{-0.16}, 27.56^{+0.18}_{-0.22},$ and $28.30^{+0.25}_{-0.33}$ respectively. In all three cases the probability of chance coincidence of lower redshift galaxies is $\lesssim2\,\%$, indicating that the detected galaxies are most likely the GRB hosts. These are the first detections of high redshift ($z > 5$) GRB host galaxies in emission. The galaxies have luminosities in the range $0.1-0.6\,L^{*}_{z=6}$ (with $M_{1600}^{*}=-20.95\pm0.12$), and half-light radii in the range $0.6-0.9\,\rm{kpc}$. Both their half-light radii and luminosities are consistent with existing samples of Lyman-break galaxies at $z\sim6$. Spectroscopic analysis of the GRB afterglows indicate low metallicities ($[\rm{M/H}]\lesssim-1$) and low dust extinction ($A_{\rm{V}}\lesssim0.1$) along the line of sight. Using stellar population synthesis models, we explore the implications of each galaxy's luminosity for its possible star formation history, and consider the potential for emission-line metallicity determination with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We present our imaging and spectroscopic observations of the host galaxies of two dark long bursts with anomalously high metallicities, LGRB 051022 and LGRB 020819B, which in conjunction with another LGRB event with an optical afterglow comprise the three LGRBs with high metallicity host galaxies in the Graham & Fruchter (2013) sample. In Graham & Fruchter (2013), we showed that LGRBs exhibit a strong and apparently intrinsic preference for low metallicity environments (12+log(O/H) < 8.4 in the KK04 scale) in spite of these three cases with abundances of about solar and above. These exceptions however are consistent with the general star-forming galaxy population of comparable brightness & redshift. This is surprising: even among a preselected sample of high metallicity LGRBs, were the metal aversion to remain in effect for these objects, we would expect their metallicity to still be lower than the typical metallicity for the galaxies at that luminosity and redshift. Therefore we deduce that it is possible to form an LGRB in a high metallicity environment although with greater rarity. From this we conclude that there are three possible explanations for the presence of the LGRBs observed in high metallicity hosts as seen to date: (1) LGRBs do not occur in high metallicity environments and those seen in high metallicity hosts are in fact occurring in low metallicity environments that have become associated with otherwise high metallicity hosts but remain unenriched. (2) The LGRB formation mechanism while preferring low metallicity environments does not strictly require it resulting in a gradual decline in burst formation with increasing metallicity. (3) The typical low metallicity LGRBs and the few high metallicity cases are the result of physically different burst formation pathways with only the former affected by the metallicity and the later occurring much more infrequently.
  • NICMOS 2 observations are crucial for constraining distances to most of the existing sample of z > 1 SNe Ia. Unlike the conventional calibration programs, these observations involve long exposure times and low count rates. Reciprocity failure is known to exist in HgCdTe devices and a correction for this effect has already been implemented for high and medium count-rates. However observations at faint count-rates rely on extrapolations. Here instead, we provide a new zeropoint calibration directly applicable to faint sources. This is obtained via inter-calibration of NIC2 F110W/F160W with WFC3 in the low count-rate regime using z ~ 1 elliptical galaxies as tertiary calibrators. These objects have relatively simple near-IR SEDs, uniform colors, and their extended nature gives superior signal-to-noise at the same count rate than would stars. The use of extended objects also allows greater tolerances on PSF profiles. We find ST magnitude zeropoints (after the installation of the NICMOS cooling system, NCS) of 25.296 +- 0.022 for F110W and 25.803 +- 0.023 for F160W, both in agreement with the calibration extrapolated from count-rates 1,000 times larger (25.262 and 25.799). Before the installation of the NCS, we find 24.843 +- 0.025 for F110W and 25.498 +- 0.021 for F160W, also in agreement with the high-count-rate calibration (24.815 and 25.470). We also check the standard bandpasses of WFC3 and NICMOS 2 using a range of stars and galaxies at different colors and find mild tension for WFC3, limiting the accuracy of the zeropoints. To avoid human bias, our cross-calibration was "blinded" in that the fitted zeropoint differences were hidden until the analysis was finalized.
  • Using three magnified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detected behind CLASH clusters, we perform a first pilot study to see whether standardizable candles can be used to calibrate cluster mass maps created from strong lensing observations. Such calibrations will be crucial when next generation HST cluster surveys (e.g. FRONTIER) provide magnification maps that will, in turn, form the basis for the exploration of the high redshift Universe. We classify SNe using combined photometric and spectroscopic observations, finding two of the three to be clearly of type SN Ia and the third probable. The SNe exhibit significant amplification, up to a factor of 1.7 at $\sim5\sigma$ significance (SN-L2). We conducted this as a blind study to avoid fine tuning of parameters, finding a mean amplification difference between SNe and the cluster lensing models of $0.09 \pm 0.09^{stat} \pm 0.05^{sys}$ mag. This impressive agreement suggests no tension between cluster mass models and high redshift standardized SNe Ia. However, the measured statistical dispersion of $\sigma_{\mu}=0.21$ mag appeared large compared to the dispersion expected based on statistical uncertainties ($0.14$). Further work with the supernova and cluster lensing models, post unblinding, reduced the measured dispersion to $\sigma_{\mu}=0.12$. An explicit choice should thus be made as to whether SNe are used unblinded to improve the model, or blinded to test the model. As the lensed SN samples grow larger, this technique will allow improved constraints on assumptions regarding e.g. the structure of the dark matter halo.
  • Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are intense flashes of cosmic gamma-rays, lasting less than ~2 s, whose origin is one of the great unsolved questions of astrophysics today. While the favoured hypothesis for their production, a relativistic jet created by the merger of two compact stellar objects (specifically, two neutron stars, NS-NS, or a neutron star and a black hole, NS-BH), is supported by indirect evidence such as their host galaxy properties, unambiguous confirmation of the model is still lacking. Mergers of this kind are also expected to create significant quantities of neutron-rich radioactive species, whose decay should result in a faint transient in the days following the burst, a so-called "kilonova". Indeed, it is speculated that this mechanism may be the predominant source of stable r-process elements in the Universe. Recent calculations suggest much of the kilonova energy should appear in the near-infrared (nIR) due to the high optical opacity created by these heavy r-process elements. Here we report strong evidence for such an event accompanying SGRB 130603B. If this simplest interpretation of the data is correct, it provides (i) support for the compact object merger hypothesis of SGRBs, (ii) confirmation that such mergers are likely sites of significant r-process production and (iii) quite possibly an alternative, un-beamed electromagnetic signature of the most promising sources for direct detection of gravitational waves.
  • We report the discovery of a redshift 1.71 supernova in the GOODS North field. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS spectrum has almost negligible contamination from the host or neighboring galaxies. Although the rest frame sampled range is too blue to include any Si ii line, a principal component analysis allows us to confirm it as a Type Ia supernova with 92% confidence. A recent serendipitous archival HST WFC3 grism spectrum contributed a key element of the confirmation by giving a host-galaxy redshift of 1.713 +/- 0.007. In addition to being the most distant SN Ia with spectroscopic confirmation, this is the most distant Ia with a precision color measurement. We present the ACS WFC and NICMOS 2 photometry and ACS and WFC3 spectroscopy. Our derived supernova distance is in agreement with the prediction of LambdaCDM.
  • We present our successful Chandra program designed to identify, with sub-arcsecond accuracy, the X-ray afterglow of the short GRB 111117A, which was discovered by Swift and Fermi. Thanks to our rapid target of opportunity request, Chandra clearly detected the X-ray afterglow, though no optical afterglow was found in deep optical observations. The host galaxy was clearly detected in the optical and near-infrared band, with the best photometric redshift of z=1.31_{-0.23}^{+0.46} (90% confidence), making it one of the highest known short GRB redshifts. Furthermore, we see an offset of 1.0 +- 0.2 arcseconds, which corresponds to 8.4 +- 1.7 kpc, between the host and the afterglow position. We discuss the importance of using Chandra for obtaining sub-arcsecond X-ray localizations of short GRB afterglows to study GRB environments.
  • We present late-time Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the fields of six Swift GRBs lying at 5.0<z<9.5. Our data includes very deep observations of the field of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed burst, GRB 090423, at z=8.2. Using the precise positions afforded by their afterglows we can place stringent limits on the luminosities of their host galaxies. In one case, that of GRB 060522 at z=5.11, there is a marginal excess of flux close to the GRB position which may be a detection of a host at a magnitude J(AB)=28.5. None of the others are significantly detected meaning that all the hosts lie below L\star at their respective redshifts, with star formation rates SFR<4Mo/yr in all cases. Indeed, stacking the five fields with WFC3-IR data we conclude a mean SFR<0.17Mo/yr per galaxy. These results support the proposition that the bulk of star formation, and hence integrated UV luminosity, at high redshifts arises in galaxies below the detection limits of deep-field observations. Making the reasonable assumption that GRB rate is proportional to UV luminosity at early times allows us to compare our limits with expectations based on galaxy luminosity functions derived from the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) and other deep fields. We infer that a luminosity function which is evolving rapidly towards steeper faint-end slope (alpha) and decreasing characteristic luminosity (L\star), as suggested by some other studies, is consistent with our observations, whereas a non-evolving LF shape is ruled out at >90% confidence. Although it is not yet possible to make stronger statements, in the future, with larger samples and a fuller understanding of the conditions required for GRB production, studies like this hold great potential for probing the nature of star formation, the shape of the galaxy luminosity function, and the supply of ionizing photons in the early universe.
  • Using the sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey and augmented with HST-observed SNe Ia in the GOODS fields, we search for correlations between the properties of SNe and their host galaxies at high redshift. We use galaxy color and quantitative morphology to determine the red sequence in 25 clusters and develop a model to distinguish passively evolving early-type galaxies from star-forming galaxies in both clusters and the field. With this approach, we identify six SN Ia hosts that are early-type cluster members and eleven SN Ia hosts that are early-type field galaxies. We confirm for the first time at z>0.9 that SNe Ia hosted by early-type galaxies brighten and fade more quickly than SNe Ia hosted by late-type galaxies. We also show that the two samples of hosts produce SNe Ia with similar color distributions. The relatively simple spectral energy distributions (SEDs) expected for passive galaxies enable us to measure stellar masses of early-type SN hosts. In combination with stellar mass estimates of late-type GOODS SN hosts from Thomson & Chary (2011), we investigate the correlation of host mass with Hubble residual observed at lower redshifts. Although the sample is small and the uncertainties are large, a hint of this relation is found at z>0.9. By simultaneously fitting the average cluster galaxy formation history and dust content to the red-sequence scatters, we show that the reddening of early-type cluster SN hosts is likely E(B-V) <~ 0.06. The similarity of the field and cluster early-type host samples suggests that field early-type galaxies that lie on the red sequence may also be minimally affected by dust. Hence, the early-type hosted SNe Ia studied here occupy a more favorable environment to use as well-characterized high-redshift standard candles than other SNe Ia.
  • We report a measurement of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate in galaxy clusters at 0.9 < z < 1.45 from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cluster Supernova Survey. This is the first cluster SN Ia rate measurement with detected z > 0.9 SNe. Finding 8 +/- 1 cluster SNe Ia, we determine a SN Ia rate of 0.50 +0.23-0.19 (stat) +0.10-0.09 (sys) SNuB (SNuB = 10^-12 SNe L_{sun,B}^-1 yr^-1). In units of stellar mass, this translates to 0.36 +0.16-0.13 (stat) +0.07-0.06 (sys) SNuM (SNuM = 10^-12 SNe M_sun^-1 yr^-1). This represents a factor of approximately 5 +/- 2 increase over measurements of the cluster rate at z < 0.2. We parameterize the late-time SN Ia delay time distribution with a power law (proportional to t^s). Under the assumption of a cluster formation redshift of z_f = 3, our rate measurement in combination with lower-redshift cluster SN Ia rates constrains s = -1.41 +0.47/-0.40, consistent with measurements of the delay time distribution in the field. This measurement is generally consistent with expectations for the "double degenerate" scenario and inconsistent with some models for the "single degenerate" scenario predicting a steeper delay time distribution at large delay times. We check for environmental dependence and the influence of younger stellar populations by calculating the rate specifically in cluster red-sequence galaxies and in morphologically early-type galaxies, finding results similar to the full cluster rate. Finally, the upper limit of one host-less cluster SN Ia detected in the survey implies that the fraction of stars in the intra-cluster medium is less than 0.47 (95% confidence), consistent with measurements at lower redshifts.
  • We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate out to z ~ 1.6 from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. In observations spanning 189 orbits with the Advanced Camera for Surveys we discovered 29 SNe, of which approximately 20 are SNe Ia. Twelve of these SNe Ia are located in the foregrounds and backgrounds of the clusters targeted in the survey. Using these new data, we derive the volumetric SN Ia rate in four broad redshift bins, finding results consistent with previous measurements at z > 1 and strengthening the case for a SN Ia rate that is equal to or greater than ~0.6 x 10^-4/yr/Mpc^3 at z ~ 1 and flattening out at higher redshift. We provide SN candidates and efficiency calculations in a form that makes it easy to rebin and combine these results with other measurements for increased statistics. Finally, we compare the assumptions about host-galaxy dust extinction used in different high-redshift rate measurements, finding that different assumptions may induce significant systematic differences between measurements.
  • We present ground-based and HST optical and infrared observations of XRF 100316D / SN 2010bh. It is seen that the optical light curves of SN 2010bh evolve at a faster rate than the archetype GRB-SN 1998bw, but at a similar rate to SN 2006aj, a supernova that was spectroscopically linked with XRF 060218, and at a similar rate to non-GRB associated type Ic SN 1994I. We estimate the rest-frame extinction of this event from our optical data to be E(B-V)=0.18 +/- 0.08 mag. We find the V-band absolute magnitude of SN 2010bh to be M_{V}=-18.62 +/- 0.08, which is the faintest peak V-band magnitude observed to-date for a spectroscopically-confirmed GRB-SNe. When we investigate the origin of the flux at t-t_{o}=0.598 days, it is shown that the light is not synchrotron in origin, but is likely coming from the supernova shock break-out. We then use our optical and infrared data to create a quasi-bolometric light curve of SN 2010bh which we model with a simple analytical formula. The results of our modeling imply that SN 2010bh synthesized a nickel mass of M_{Ni} \approx 0.10 M_{sun}, ejected M_{ej} \approx 2.2 M_{sun} and has an explosion energy of E_{k} \approx 1.4 x 10^{52} erg. Finally, for a sample 22 GRB-SNe we check for a correlation between the stretch factors and luminosity factors in the R band and conclude that no statistically-significant correlation exists.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) serve as powerful probes of the early Universe, with their luminous afterglows revealing the locations and physical properties of star forming galaxies at the highest redshifts, and potentially locating first generation (Population III) stars. Since GRB afterglows have intrinsically very simple spectra, they allow robust redshifts from low signal to noise spectroscopy, or photometry. Here we present a photometric redshift of z~9.4 for the Swift-detected GRB 090429B based on deep observations with Gemini-North, the Very Large Telescope, and the GRB Optical and Near-infrared Detector. Assuming a Small Magellanic Cloud dust law (which has been found in a majority of GRB sight-lines), the 90% likelihood range for the redshift is 9.06 < z < 9.52, although there is a low-probability tail to somewhat lower redshifts. Adopting Milky Way or Large Magellanic Cloud dust laws leads to very similar conclusions, while a Maiolino law does allow somewhat lower redshift solutions, but in all cases the most likely redshift is found to be z>7. The non-detection of the host galaxy to deep limits (Y_AB >~ 28 mag, which would correspond roughly to 0.001 L* at z=1) in our late time optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope strongly supports the extreme redshift origin of GRB 090429B, since we would expect to have detected any low-z galaxy, even if it were highly dusty. Finally, the energetics of GRB 090429B are comparable to those of other GRBs, and suggest that its progenitor is not greatly different to those of lower redshift bursts.
  • Variable X-ray and gamma-ray emission is characteristic of the most extreme physical processes in the Universe, and studying the sources of these energetic photons has been a major driver in astronomy for the past 50 years. Here we present multiwavelength observations of a unique gamma-ray selected transient, discovered by Swift, which was accompanied by bright emission across the electromagnetic spectrum, and whose properties are unlike any previously observed source. We pinpoint the event to the center of a small, star-forming galaxy at redshift z=0.3534. Its high-energy emission has lasted much longer than any gamma-ray burst, while its peak luminosity was about 100 times higher than the brightest active galactic nuclei. The association of the outburst with the center of its host galaxy suggests that this phenomenon has its origin in a new, rare mechanism associated with a massive black hole in the nucleus of a galaxy.
  • We present ground-based and HST optical observations of the optical transients (OTs) of long-duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) 060729 and 090618, both at a redshift of z = 0.54. For GRB 060729, bumps are seen in the optical light curves (LCs), and the late-time broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the OT resemble those of local type Ic supernovae (SNe). For GRB 090618, the dense sampling of our optical observations has allowed us to detect well-defined bumps in the optical LCs, as well as a change in colour, that are indicative of light coming from a core-collapse SN. The accompanying SNe for both events are individually compared with SN1998bw, a known GRB-supernova, and SN1994I, a typical type Ic supernova without a known GRB counterpart, and in both cases the brightness and temporal evolution more closely resemble SN1998bw. We also exploit our extensive optical and radio data for GRB 090618, as well as the publicly-available SWIFT -XRT data, and discuss the properties of the afterglow at early times. In the context of a simple jet-like model, the afterglow of GRB 090618 is best explained by the presence of a jet-break at t-to > 0.5 days. We then compare the rest-frame, peak V -band absolute magnitudes of all of the GRB and X-Ray Flash (XRF)-associated SNe with a large sample of local type Ibc SNe, concluding that, when host extinction is considered, the peak magnitudes of the GRB/XRF-SNe cannot be distinguished from the peak magnitudes of non-GRB/XRF SNe.
  • Aims: With this paper we want to investigate the highly variable afterglow light curve and environment of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060526 at $z=3.221$. Methods: We present one of the largest photometric datasets ever obtained for a GRB afterglow, consisting of multi-color photometric data from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The data set contains 412 data points in total to which we add additional data from the literature. Furthermore, we present low-resolution high signal-to-noise spectra of the afterglow. The afterglow light curve is modeled with both an analytical model using broken power law fits and with a broad-band numerical model which includes energy injections. The absorption lines detected in the spectra are used to derive column densities using a multi-ion single-component curve-of-growth analysis from which we derive the metallicity of the host of GRB 060526. Results: The temporal behaviour of the afterglow follows a double broken power law with breaks at $t=0.090\pm0.005$ and $t=2.401\pm0.061$ days. It shows deviations from the smooth set of power laws that can be modeled by additional energy injections from the central engine, although some significant microvariability remains. The broadband spectral-energy distribution of the afterglow shows no significant extinction along the line of sight. The metallicity derived from \ion{S}{II} and \ion{Fe}{II} of [S/H] = --0.57 $\pm$0.25 and [Fe/H] = --1.09$\pm$0.24 is relatively high for a galaxy at that redshift but comparable to the metallicity of other GRB hosts at similar redshifts. At the position of the afterglow, no host is detected to F775W(AB) = 28.5 mag with the HST, implying an absolute magnitude of the host M(1500 \AA{})$>$--18.3 mag which is fainter than most long-duration hosts, although the GRB may be associated with a faint galaxy at a distance of 11 kpc.