• We report the results of spectroscopic and photometric observations of the emission-line object AS 386. For the first time, we found that it exhibits the B[e] phenomenon and fits the definition of an FS CMa type object. The optical spectrum shows the presence of a B-type star with the following properties: T_ eff = 11000+/-500 K, log L/L_sun = 3.7+/-0.3, a mass of 7+/-1 M_sun, and a distance D = 2.4+/-0.3 kpc from the Sun. We detected regular radial velocity variations of both absorption and emission lines with the following orbital parameters: P_orb = 131.27+/-0.09 days, semi-amplitude K_1 = 51.7+/-3.0 km/s, systemic radial velocity gamma = -31.8+/-2.6 km/s, and a mass function of f(m) = 1.9+/-0.3 M_sun. AS 386 exhibits irregular variations of the optical brightness (V=10.92+/-0.05 mag), while the near-IR brightness varies up to ~0.3 mag following the spectroscopic period. We explain this behavior by a variable illumination of the dusty disk inner rim by the B-type component. Doppler tomography based on the orbital variations of emission-line profiles shows that the material is distributed near the B-type component and in a circumbinary disk. We conclude that the system has undergone a strong mass transfer that created the circumstellar material and increased the B-type component mass. The absence of any traces of a secondary component, whose mass should be >= 7 M_sun, suggests that it is most likely a black hole.
  • Based on XMM--Newton X-ray observations IGR J19552+0044 appears to be either a pre-polar or an asynchronous polar. We conducted follow-up optical observations to identify the sources and periods of variability precisely and to classify this X-ray source correctly. Extensive multicolor photometric and medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy observations were performed and period search codes were applied to sort out the complex variability of the object. We found firm evidence of discording spectroscopic (81.29+/-0.01m) and photometric (83.599+/-0.002m) periods that we ascribe to the white dwarf (WD)\ spin period and binary orbital period, respectively. This confirms that IGR J19552+0044 is an asynchronous polar. Wavelength-dependent variability and its continuously changing shape point at a cyclotron emission from a magnetic WD with a relatively low magnetic field below 20 MG. The difference between the WD spin period and the binary orbital period proves that IGR J19552+0044 is a polar with the largest known degree of asynchronism (0.97 or 3%).
  • We report extensive 3-yr multiwavelength observations of the WZ Sge-type dwarf nova SSS J122221.7-311525 during its unusual double superoutburst, the following decline and in quiescence. The second segment of the superoutburst had a long duration of 33 d and a very gentle decline with a rate of 0.02 mag/d, and it displayed an extended post-outburst decline lasting at least 500 d. Simultaneously with the start of the rapid fading from the superoutburst plateau, the system showed the appearance of a strong near-infrared excess resulting in very red colours, which reached extreme values (B-I~1.4) about 20 d later. The colours then became bluer again, but it took at least 250 d to acquire a stable level. Superhumps were clearly visible in the light curve from our very first time-resolved observations until at least 420 d after the rapid fading from the superoutburst. The spectroscopic and photometric data revealed an orbital period of 109.80 min and a fractional superhump period excess <0.8 per cent, indicating a very low mass ratio q<0.045. With such a small mass ratio the donor mass should be below the hydrogen-burning minimum mass limit. The observed infrared flux in quiescence is indeed much lower than is expected from a cataclysmic variable with a near-main-sequence donor star. This strongly suggests a brown-dwarf-like nature for the donor and that SSS J122221.7-311525 has already evolved away from the period minimum towards longer periods, with the donor now extremely dim.
  • We present the results of an analysis of 21 spectra of alpha UMi (Polaris) obtained in September - December 2015. Frequency analysis shows an increase of the pulsation period up to 8.6 min in comparison to the 2007 observational set. The radial velocity amplitude comes to 4.16 km s^-1, and it approximately twice the one found in 2007. The average Teff = 6017 K, and it is close to the value determined for the 2001-2004 set. Therefore Polaris moves to the red edge of the Cepheid instability strip (CIS)
  • We studied two objects identified as a Cataclysmic Variables (CVs) with periods exceeding the natural boundary for Roche lobe filling ZAMS secondary stars. We present observational results for V1082 Sgr with 20.82 h orbital period, an object that shows low luminosity state, when its flux is totally dominated by a chromospherically active K- star with no signs of ongoing accretion. Frequent accretion shut-offs, together with characteristics of emission lines in a high state, indicate that this binary system is probably detached and the accretion of matter on the magnetic white dwarf takes place through stellar wind from the active donor star via coupled magnetic fields. Its observational characteristics are surprisingly similar to V479 And, a 14.5 h binary system. They both have early K-type stars as a donor star. We argue, that similar to the shorter period pre-polars containing M-dwarfs, these are detached binaries with strong magnetic components. Their magnetic fields are coupled, allowing enhanced stellar wind from the K star to be captured and channeled through the bottleneck connecting the two stars onto the white dwarf's magnetic pole, mimicking a magnetic CV. Hence, they become interactive binaries before they reach contact. This will help to explain an unexpected lack of systems possessing white dwarfs with strong magnetic fields among detached white + red dwarf systems.
  • MWC 314 is one of the most luminous stars in the Milky Way. Its fundamental parameters are similar to those of LBVs, although no large photometric variations have been recorded. We analyzed the radial velocity (RV) variations displayed by the absorption lines from the star's atmosphere using high resolution optical spectra. The RV and profile variations of some permitted and forbidden emission lines of metallic ions and the behavior of the Balmer and HeI lines has been investigated as well. The RV of the absorption lines clearly shows a 60-day periodicity. A dense coverage of the RV curve allowed us to derive accurate orbital parameters. The RV of the FeII emission lines varies in the same way, but with a smaller amplitude. Additionally, the intensity ratio of the blue/red peaks of these emission lines correlates with the RV variations. The Balmer lines and {NII] lines display a nearly constant RV and no profile variations in phase with the orbital motion instead. The HeI-5876 \AA\ line shows a strongly variable profile with broad and blue-shifted absorption components reaching velocities of <-1000 km/s at some specific orbital phases. Our data strongly suggest that the object is a binary system composed from a supergiant B[e] star and an undetected companion. The emission lines with a non-variable RV could originate in a circumbinary region. For the FeII emission lines we propose a simple geometrical two-component model where a compact source of FeII emission, moving around the center of mass, is affected by a static extra absorption that originates from a larger area. Finally, the blue-shifted absorption in the HeI-5876 \AA\ line could be the result of density enhancements in the primary star wind flowing towards the companion that is best observed when projected over the disk of the primary star.
  • We present spectroscopic and photometric observations of the emission-line star MWC 930 (V446 Sct) during its long-term optical brightening in 2006--2013. Based on our earlier data we suggested that the object has features found in Luminous Blue Variables (LBV), such as a high luminosity (~3 10^5 Lsun, a low wind terminal velocity (~ 140 km/s), and a tendency to show strong brightness variations (~1 mag over 20 years). For the last ~7 years it has been exhibiting a continuous optical and near-IR brightening along with a change of the emission-line spectrum appearance and cooling of the star's photosphere. We present the object's $V$--band light curve, analyze the spectral variations, and compare the observed properties with those of other recognized Galactic LBVs, such as AG Car and HR Car. Overall we conclude the MWC 930 is a bona fide Galactic LBV that is currently in the middle of an S Dor cycle.
  • The work is aimed at a study of the circumstellar disk of the bright classical binary Be star {\pi} Aqr. We analysed variations of a double-peaked profile of the H{\alpha} emission line in the spectrum of {\pi} Aqr that was observed in many phases during ~40 orbital cycles in 2004--2013. We applied the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) method to search for periodicity in the peak intensity (V/R) ratio. Doppler tomography was used to study the structure of the disk around the primary. The dominant frequency in the power spectrum of the H{\alpha} V/R ratio is 0.011873 day^-1 that correspond to a period of 84.2(2) days and is in agreement with the earlier determined orbital period of the system, Porb=84.1 days. The V/R ratio shows a sinusoidal variation phase-locked with the orbital period. Doppler maps of all our spectra show a non-uniform structure of the disk around the primary: a ring with the inner and outer radii at Vin~ 450 km/s and Vout~ 200km/s, respectively, along with an extended stable region (spot) at V_x ~ 225 km/s and V_y~100 km/s. The disk radius of ~ 65 Rsun = 0.33 AU was estimated assuming Keplerian motion of a particle on a circular orbit at the disk outer edge.
  • FF Cam is a variable star near the North celestial pole with hydrogen lines in emission. Its optical variability of ~0.3 mag was discovered by HIPPARCOS. The spectral type assigned to the star in SIMBAD is B9, but its position coincides with a ROSAT X-ray source. This suggests the presence of a high-temperature region in the system that could originate at or near a companion object. We undertook a spectroscopic monitoring of FF Cam since the beginning of 2012 and found an extremely variable H-alpha line profile as well as periodically variable radial velocities of numerous absorption lines. The main conclusion from our study is that FF Cam is a binary system with an orbital period of 7.785 days, a B-type primary and a K-type secondary component. We discuss the spectral features, their variations, and the nature of FF Cam.
  • We present prelimiary results from a coordinated spectroscopic campaign in 2011, centered on the \delta Sco periastron passage in July. Data have mostly been obtained with the FEROS/2.2 m at La Silla and ESPaDOnS/CFHT at Mauna Kea echelle instruments. Main results include the absence of tidally induced disturbance to the main \beta Cephei pulsation mode and the absence of tidally triggered mass-ejection at time of periastron proper. The observed (as far as yet analyzed) variations are compatible with the picture of a disk that is disturbed on its outer radius, with the disturbance propagating inwards after the periastron.
  • Aims. We study the enigmatic B[e] star MWC 300 to investigate its disk and binary with milli-arcsecond-scale angular resolution. Methods. We observed MWC 300 with the VLTI/AMBER instrument in the H and K bands and compared these observations with temperature-gradient models to derive model parameters. Results. The measured low visibility values, wavelength dependence of the visibilities, and wavelength dependence of the closure phase directly suggest that MWC 300 consists of a resolved disk and a close binary. We present a model consisting of a binary and a temperature-gradient disk that is able to reproduce the visibilities, closure phases, and spectral energy distribution. This model allows us to constrain the projected binary separation (~4.4 mas or ~7.9 AU), the flux ratio of the binary components (~2.2), the disk temperature power-law index, and other parameters.
  • The FS CMa stars exhibit bright optical emission-line spectra and strong IR excesses. Very little is known of their radio characteristics. We analyzed archive Very Large Array data to search for radio continuum emission in a sample of them. There are good quality data for seven of the $\sim$40 known FS CMa stars. Of these seven stars, five turn out to have associated radio emission. Two of these stars, CI Cam and MWC 300, have been previously reported in the literature as radio emitters. We present and briefly discuss the radio detection of the other three sources: FS CMa (the prototype of the class), AS 381, and MWC 922. The radio emission is most probably of a free-free nature but additional observations are required to better characterize it.
  • We present the results of high-resolution optical spectroscopy, low-resolution near-IR spectroscopy and near-infrared speckle interferometry of the massive young stellar object candidate V645 Cyg, acquired to refine its fundamental parameters and the properties of its circumstellar envelope. Speckle interferometry in the $H$- and $K$-bands and an optical spectrum in the range 5200--6680 \AA with a spectral resolving power of $R$ = 60 000 were obtained at the 6-m telescope of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Another optical spectrum in the range 4300--10500 \AA with $R$ = 79 000 was obtained at the 3.6-m CFHT. Low-resolution spectra in the ranges 0.46--1.4 $\mu$m and 1.4--2.5 $\mu$m with $R \sim$ 800 and $\sim$ 700, respectively, were obtained at the 3-m Shane telescope of the Lick Observatory. Using a novel kinematical method based on the non-linear modeling of the neutral hydrogen density profile in the direction toward the object, we propose a distance of $D = 4.2\pm$0.2 kpc. We also suggest a revised estimate of the star's effective temperature, T$_{\rm eff} \sim$25 000 K. We resolved the object in both $H$- and $K$-bands. We conclude that V645 Cyg is a young, massive, main-sequence star, which recently emerged from its cocoon and has already experienced its protostellar accretion stage. The presence of accretion is not necessary to account for the high observed luminosity of (2--6)$\times 10^4$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. The receding part of a strong, mostly uniform outflow with a terminal velocity of $\sim$800 km s$^{-1}$ is only blocked from view far from the star, where forbidden lines form.
  • We present optical $WBVR$ and infrared $JHKL$ photometric observations of the Be binary system $\delta$ Sco, obtained in 2000--2005, mid-infrared (10 and $18 \mu$m) photometry and optical ($\lambda\lambda$ 3200--10500 \AA) spectropolarimetry obtained in 2001. Our optical photometry confirms the results of much more frequent visual monitoring of $\delta$ Sco. In 2005, we detected a significant decrease in the object's brightness, both in optical and near-infrared brightness, which is associated with a continuous rise in the hydrogen line strenghts. We discuss possible causes for this phenomenon, which is difficult to explain in view of current models of Be star disks. The 2001 spectral energy distribution and polarization are succesfully modeled with a three-dimensional non-LTE Monte Carlo code which produces a self-consistent determination of the hydrogen level populations, electron temperature, and gas density for hot star disks. Our disk model is hydrostatically supported in the vertical direction and radially controlled by viscosity. Such a disk model has, essentially, only two free parameters, viz., the equatorial mass loss rate and the disk outer radius. We find that the primary companion is surrounded by a small (7 $R_\star$), geometrically-thin disk, which is highly non-isothermal and fully ionized. Our model requires an average equatorial mass loss rate of $1.5\times 10^{-9} M_{\sun}$ yr$^{-1}$.
  • We present self-consistent solutions for the disk structure of classical Be stars. Our disk model is hydrostatically supported in the vertical direction and the radial structure is governed by viscosity ($\alpha$-disks). We perform three-dimensional non-LTE Monte Carlo simulations to calculate simultaneously both the equilibrium temperature and Hydrogen level populations and to solve self-consistently for the density structure of the disk. We discuss the general properties of the solution for the disk structure and test our model against observations of $\delta$ Scorpii. Our results confirm that a viscous decretion disk model is consistent with these observations.
  • We present the first high spatial and spectral observations of the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of a B[e] supergiant (CPD$-57 2874$), performed with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Spectra, visibilities, and closure phase, were obtained using the beam-combiner instruments AMBER (near-IR interferometry with three 8.3 m Unit Telescopes or UTs) and MIDI (mid-IR interferometry with two UTs). The interferometric observations of the CSE are well fitted by an elliptical Gaussian model with FWHM diameters varying linearly with wavelength. Typical diameters measured are $\simeq1.8\times3.4$ mas or $\simeq4.5\times8.5$ AU (adopting a distance of 2.5 kpc) at $2.2\micron$, and $\simeq12\times15$ mas or $\simeq30\times38$ AU at $12\micron$. The size of the region emitting the Br$\gamma$ flux is $\simeq2.8\times5.2$ mas or $\simeq7.0\times13.0$ AU. The major-axis position angle of the elongated CSE in the mid-IR ($\simeq144\degr$) agrees well with previous polarimetric data, hinting that the hot-dust emission originates in a disk-like structure. In addition to the interferometric observations we also present new optical ($UBVR_{c}I_{c}$) and near-IR ($JHKL$) broadband photometric observations of CPD$-57 2874$. Our spectro-interferometric VLTI observations and data analysis support the non-spherical CSE paradigm for B[e] supergiants.
  • We present the first spectro-interferometric observations of the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of a B[e] supergiant (CPD -57 2874), performed with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) using the beam-combiner instruments AMBER (near-IR interferometry with three 8.3 m Unit Telescopes or UTs) and MIDI (mid-IR interferometry with two UTs). Our observations of the CSE are well fitted by an elliptical Gaussian model with FWHM diameters varying linearly with wavelength. Typical diameters measured are $\simeq1.8\times3.4$ mas or $\simeq4.5\times8.5$ AU (adopting a distance of 2.5 kpc) at $2.2\micron$, and $\simeq12\times15$ mas or $\simeq30\times38$ AU at $12\micron$. We show that a spherical dust model reproduces the SED but it underestimates the MIDI visibilities, suggesting that a dense equatorial disk is required to account for the compact dust-emitting region observed. Moreover, the derived major-axis position angle in the mid-IR ($\simeq144\degr$) agrees well with previous polarimetric data, hinting that the hot-dust emission originates in a disk-like structure. Our results support the non-spherical CSE paradigm for B[e] supergiants.
  • We present the results of optical and near-IR spectroscopic and near-IR photometric observations of the emission-line stars Hen3-298 and Hen3-303. Strong emission in the H-alpha line is found in both objects. The presence of Fe II and [O I] emission lines in the spectrum of Hen3-298 indicates that it is a B[e] star. The double-peaked CO line profiles, found in the infrared spectrum of Hen3-298, along with the optical line profiles suggest that the star is surrounded by a rotating circumstellar disk. Both objects also show infrared excesses, similar to those of B[e] stars. The radial velocities of the absorption and emission lines as well as a high reddening level suggest that the objects are located in the Norma spiral arm at a distance of 3-4.5 kpc. We estimated a luminosity of log (L/L_sun) ~ 5.1 and a spectral type of no earlier than B3 for Hen3-298. Hen3-303 seems to be a less luminous B-type object (log (L/L_sun) ~ 4.3), located in the same spiral arm.