• We assessed the scientific productivity and data usage statistics of XMM-Newton by examining 3272 refereed papers published until the end of 2012 that directly use XMM-Newton data. The SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) was accessed for information on each paper including the number of citations. For each paper, the XMM-Newton observation identifiers and instruments were determined and used extract detailed information from the XMM-Newton archive on the parameters of the observations. The information obtained from these sources was then combined to allow the scientific productivity of the mission to be assessed. Since three years after the launch, about 300 refereed papers per year were published that directly use XMM-Newton data. After more than 13 years in operation, this rate shows no decline. Since 2002, around 100 scientists per year have become lead authors for the first time. Each refereed XMM-Newton paper receives around four citations per year in the first few years with a long-term citation rate of three citations per year, more than five years after publication. About half of the articles citing XMM-Newton articles are not primarily X-ray observational papers. The distribution of elapsed time between observations taken under the Guest Observer programme and first article peaks at 2 years with a possible second peak at 3.25 years. Observations taken under the Target of Opportunity programme are published significantly faster, after one year on average. 90% of science time taken until the end of 2009 has been used in at least one article. Most observations were used more than once, yielding on average a factor of two in usage on available observing time per year. About 20% of all slew observations have been used in publications. The scientific productivity of XMM-Newton remains extremely high with no evidence that it is decreasing after more than 13 years of operations.
  • In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are considered for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-epsilon turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear variation that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during whole time. Numerical experiments for constant, monotone increasing and monotone decreasing of inlet temperature are done to show its effect on the buoyancy force in terms of Richardson number
  • AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from the mid- to far-infrared. The instruments also have the capability for imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2 - 180 micron in the pointed observation mode, occasionally inserted into the continuous survey operation. The in-orbit cryogen lifetime is expected to be one and a half years. The All-Sky Survey will cover more than 90 percent of the whole sky with higher spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage than that of the previous IRAS all-sky survey. Point source catalogues of the All-Sky Survey will be released to the astronomical community. The pointed observations will be used for deep surveys of selected sky areas and systematic observations of important astronomical targets. These will become an additional future heritage of this mission.
  • We present photometric ISO 60 and 170um measurements, complemented by some IRAS data at 60um, of a sample of 84 nearby main-sequence stars of spectral class A, F, G and K in order to determine the incidence of dust disks around such main-sequence stars. Of the stars younger than 400 Myr one in two has a disk; for the older stars this is true for only one in ten. We conclude that most stars arrive on the main sequence surrounded by a disk; this disk then decays in about 400 Myr. Because (i) the dust particles disappear and must be replenished on a much shorter time scale and (ii) the collision of planetesimals is a good source of new dust, we suggest that the rapid decay of the disks is caused by the destruction and escape of planetesimals. We suggest that the dissipation of the disk is related to the heavy bombardment phase in our Solar System. Whether all stars arrive on the main sequence surrounded by a disk cannot be established: some very young stars do not have a disk. And not all stars destroy their disk in a similar way: some stars as old as the Sun still have significant disks.
  • We present 2.5-11 micron spectrophotometric & imaging ISO observations of 28 Sf1, 29 Sf2 & 1 normal galaxy. The Sf1 & Sf2 MIR spectra are statistically different: Sf1 have a strong power-law continuum of index -0.84+/-0.24 & weak PAH emission bands. Sf2s have a weak continuum & very strong PAH emission features with EW (equivalent widths) up to 7.2 micron. On the other hand, the Sf1 and Sf2 PAH luminosities do not differ statistically and the 7 micron continuum is ~8 times less luminous in Sf2s than in Sf1s. The PAH emission is unrelated to the nuclear activity & arises in the bulge ISM. PAH EW are thus a sensitive nuclear redenning indicator. These results are consistent with unified schemes & imply that the Sf2 MIR nuclear continuum is, on the average, extinguished by 92+/-37 visual magnitudes whereas it is directly visible in Sf1s. The dispersion in Sf2's PAH EW is consistent with the expected spread in viewing angles. Those Sf2s with PAH EW > 5 micron suffer from > 125 magnitudes of extinction and are invariably weak X-ray sources. Such Sf2s represent the highly inclined objects where our line of sight intercepts the full extent of the torus. About 1/3rd of the Sf2s have PAH EW <= 2 micron, in the range of Sf1s. Among them, those which have been observed in spectropolarimetry or IR spectroscopy invariably display "hidden" broad lines. As proposed by Heisler et al (1997), such Sf2s are most likely seen at grazing incidence such that one has a direct view of both the "reflecting screen" and the torus inner wall emitting the MIR continuum. Our observations thus constrain the screen & the torus inner wall to be spatially co-located. Finally, the 9.7 micron Silicate feature appears weakly in emission in Sf1s, implying that the torus vertical thickness cannot significantly exceed E+24 cm-2
  • We present low resolution spectrophotometric and imaging ISO observations of a sample of 54 AGN's over the 2.5-11 micron range. The observations generally support unification schemes and set new constraints on models of the molecular torus.