• First order quantum phase transitions (1QPTs) are signaled, in the thermodynamic limit, by discontinuous changes in the ground state properties. These discontinuities affect expectation values of observables, including spatial correlations. When a 1QPT is crossed in the vicinity of a second order one (2QPT), due to the correlation length divergence of the latter, the corresponding ground state is modified and it becomes increasingly difficult to determine the order of the transition when the size of the system is finite. Here we show that, in such situations, it is possible to apply finite size scaling to entanglement measures, as it has recently been done for the order parameters and the energy gap, in order to recover the correct thermodynamic limit. Such a finite size scaling can unambigously discriminate between first and second order phase transitions in the vicinity of multricritical points even when the singularities displayed by entanglement measures lead to controversial results.
  • We study the onset of localization from excited states of trapped Bose- Einstein Condensates expanding in presence of Gaussian uncorrelated random disorder. In 1D systems, we observe that for a fixed ratio between the disorder strength and the initial energy, excited states localize exponentially with a localization length that decreases as the energy of the initial state increases. Moreover, the localized state keeps the shape of the initial state wave function with an exponential tail. In 2D, we analyze the interplay between vorticiy and localization by examining the dispersion of a state containing a vortex on it in a disordered media. Despite localization can be associated to islands of constant phase, the presence of a vortex in the initial state leads to dislocations and phase jumps in the localized state. The study of dispersion of a bosonic condensate with vorticity bears similarities to the stability of topological excitations in 2D p-wave fermionic superfluids.
  • Disordered quantum antiferromagnets in two-dimensional compounds have been a focus of interest in the last years due to their exotic properties. However, with very few exceptions, the ground states of the corresponding Hamiltonians are notoriously difficult to simulate making their characterization and detection very elusive, both, theoretically and experimentally. Here we propose a method to signal quantum disordered antiferromagnets by doing exact diagonalization in small lattices using random boundary conditions and averaging the observables of interest over the different disorder realizations. We apply our method to study a Heisenberg spin-1/2 model in an anisotropic triangular lattice. In this model, the competition between frustration and quantum fluctuations might lead to some spin liquid phases as predicted from different methods ranging from spin wave mean field theory to 2D-DMRG or PEPS. Our method accurately reproduces the ordered phases expected of the model and signals disordered phases by the presence of a large number of quasi degenerate ground states together with the absence of a local order parameter. The method presents a weak dependence on finite size effects.
  • Lattice gases in the strongly correlated regime have been proven to simulate quantum magnetic models under certain conditions: the mapping of the double-well system onto the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick spin model is a paradigmatic case. A suitable definition of the length in the Hilbert space of the system leads to the concept of a correlation length, whose divergence is a characteristic property of continuous quantum phase transitions. We calculate the finite-size scaling of some observables like e.g. the magnetization or the population imbalance, as well as of the Schmidt gap, obtaining in this way the critical exponents associated to such transitions. The systematic definition of the Schmidt gap in extended Hamiltonians provides a good tool to analyze the set of critical exponents associated to transitions in systems formed by a larger number of traps. This demonstrates, thus, the potential use of mesoscopic Bose-Einstein condensates as quantum simulators of condensed matter systems.
  • Mesoscopic samples of polarized dipolar atoms confined in three spatially separated traps conform an extended Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian in which different quantum phases appear depending on the competition between tunneling, on-site and long range inter-site dipole-dipole interactions. Here, by choosing an appropriate configuration of triple-wells, we analyze the role played by the anisotropic character inherent to the dipolar interaction in the phase diagram of the system. We further characterize the different phases as well as their boundaries by means of their entanglement properties.
  • Mesoscopic interacting Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a few traps display phase transitions that cannot be explained with a mean field theory. By describing each trap as an effective site of a Bose-Hubbard model and using the Schwinger representation of spin operators, these systems can be mapped to spin models. We show that it is possible to define correlations between bosons in such a way that critical behavior is associated to the divergence of a correlation length accompanied by a gapless spectrum in the thermodynamic limit. The latter is now defined as the limit in which the mean field analysis becomes valid. Such description provides critical exponents to the associated phase transitions and encompasses the notion of universality demonstrating thus the potential use of mesoscopic Bose-Einstein condensates as quantum simulators of condensed matter systems.
  • The different quantum phases appearing in strongly correlated systems as well as their transitions are closely related to the entanglement shared between their constituents. In 1D systems, it is well established that the entanglement spectrum is linked to the symmetries that protect the different quantum phases. This relation extends even further at the phase transitions where a direct link associates the entanglement spectrum to the conformal field theory describing the former. For 2D systems much less is known. The lattice geometry becomes a crucial aspect to consider when studying entanglement and phase transitions. Here, we analyze the entanglement properties of triangular spin lattice models by considering also concepts borrowed from quantum information theory such as geometric entanglement.
  • We study the spin-$1$ model in a triangular lattice in presence of a uniaxial anisotropy field using a Cluster Mean-Field approach (CMF). The interplay between antiferromagnetic exchange, lattice geometry and anisotropy forces Gutzwiller mean-field approaches to fail in a certain region of the phase diagram. There, the CMF yields two supersolid (SS) phases compatible with those present in the spin-$1/2$ XXZ model onto which the spin-$1$ system maps. Between these two SS phases, the three-sublattice order is broken and the results of the CMF depend heavily on the geometry and size of the cluster. We discuss the possible presence of a spin liquid in this region.
  • The entanglement spectrum describing quantum correlations in many-body systems has been recently recognized as a key tool to characterize different quantum phases, including topological ones. Here we derive its analytically scaling properties in the vicinity of some integrable quantum phase transitions and extend our studies also to non integrable quantum phase transitions in one dimensional spin models numerically. Our analysis shows that, in all studied cases, the scaling of the difference between the two largest non degenerate Schmidt eigenvalues yields with good accuracy critical points and mass scaling exponents.
  • We investigate the entanglement spectrum near criticality in finite quantum spin chains. Using finite size scaling we show that when approaching a quantum phase transition, the Schmidt gap, i.e., the difference between the two largest eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix, signals the critical point and scales with universal critical exponents related to the relevant operators of the corresponding perturbed conformal field theory describing the critical point. Such scaling behavior allows us to identify explicitly the Schmidt gap as a local order parameter.
  • We propose a method to probe time dependent correlations of non trivial observables in many-body ultracold lattice gases. The scheme uses a quantum non-demolition matter-light interface, first, to map the observable of interest on the many body system into the light and, then, to store coherently such information into an external system acting as a quantum memory. Correlations of the observable at two (or more) instances of time are retrieved with a single final measurement that includes the readout of the quantum memory. Such method brings at reach the study of dynamics of many-body systems in and out of equilibrium by means of quantum memories in the field of quantum simulators.
  • The Heisenberg model for spin-1 bosons in one dimension presents many different quantum phases including the famous topological Haldane phase. Here we study the robustness of such phases in front of a SU(2) symmetry breaking field as well as the emergence of novel phases. Previous studies have analyzed the effect of such uniaxial anysotropy in some restricted relevant points of the phase diagram. Here we extend those studies and present the complete phase diagram of the spin-1 chain with uniaxial anysotropy. To this aim, we employ the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) together with analytical approaches. The complete phase diagram can be realized using ultracold spinor gases in the Mott insulator regime under a quadratic Zeeman effect.
  • A forthcoming challenge in ultracold lattice gases is the simulation of quantum magnetism. That involves both the preparation of the lattice atomic gas in the desired spin state and the probing of the state. Here we demonstrate how a probing scheme based on atom-light interfaces gives access to the order parameters of nontrivial quantum magnetic phases, allowing us to characterize univocally strongly correlated magnetic systems produced in ultracold gases. This method, which is also nondemolishing, yields spatially resolved spin correlations and can be applied to bosons or fermions. As a proof of principle, we apply this method to detect the complete phase diagram displayed by a chain of (rotationally invariant) spin-1 bosons.
  • We present a study of binary mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a double-well potential within the framework of the mean field Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We reexamine both the single component and the binary mixture cases for such a potential, and we investigate in which situations a simpler two-mode approach leads to an accurate description of their dynamics. We also estimate the validity of the most usual dimensionality reductions used to solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equations. To this end, we compare both the semi-analytical two-mode approaches and the numerical simulations of the 1D reductions with the full 3D numerical solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Our analysis provides a guide to clarify the validity of several simplified models that describe mean field non-linear dynamics, using an experimentally feasible binary mixture of an F=1 spinor condensate with two of its Zeeman manifolds populated, m=+1 and m=-1.
  • We propose to realize a p-wave superfluid using bosons mixed with a single species of fermions in a deep optical lattice. We analyze with a self-consistent method its excitation spectrum in presence of a vortex, and we point out the range of interaction strengths in which the zero-energy mode with topological character exists on a finite optical lattice. Lattice effects are strongest close to fermionic half-filling: here the linearity of the low-lying spectrum is lost, and a new class of extended zero-energy modes with checkerboard structure and d-wave symmetry appears.
  • We analyze theoretically Josephson oscillations in a mixture of two Zeeman states of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate in a double-well potential. We find that in the strongly polarized case, the less populated component exhibits a complex dynamics with an anti-Josephson behavior, i.e. oscillates in phase with the more populated one. In the balanced population case the Josephson oscillations unveal a dependence with the different spin collision channels. This effect could be used to experimentally measure the distinct scattering lengths entering in the description of a spinor condensate. Our numerical results are in close agreement with an analytical description of the binary mixture using a two mode model.
  • We show how spin-spin correlations, detected in a non-destructive way via spatially resolved quantum polarization spectroscopy, strongly characterize various phases realized in trapped ultracold fermionic atoms. Polarization degrees of freedom of the light couple to spatially resolved components of the atomic spin. In this way quantum fluctuations of matter are faithfully mapped onto those of light. In particular we demonstrate that quantum spin polarization spectroscopy provides a direct method to detect the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov phase realized in a one-dimensional imbalanced Fermi system.
  • We demonstrate that the Byzantine Agreement (detectable broadcast) is also solvable in the continuous-variable scenario with multipartite entangled Gaussian states and Gaussian operations (homodyne detection). Within this scheme we find that Byzantine Agreement requires a minimum amount of entanglement in the multipartite states used in order to achieve a solution. We discuss realistic implementations of the protocol, which consider the possibility of having inefficient homodyne detectors, not perfectly correlated outcomes, and noise in the preparation of the resource states. The proposed protocol is proven to be robust and efficiently applicable under such non-ideal conditions.
  • We investigate collisions of solitons of the gap type, supported by a lattice potential in repulsive Bose-Einstein condensates, with an effective double-barrier potential that resembles a Fabry-Perot cavity. We identify conditions under which the trapping of the entire incident soliton in the cavity is possible. Collisions of the incident soliton with an earlier trapped one are considered too. In the latter case, many outcomes of the collisions are identified, including merging, release of the trapped soliton with or without being replaced by the incoming one, and trapping of both solitons.
  • We quantify correlations (quantum and/or classical) between two continuous variable modes in terms of how many correlated bits can be extracted by measuring the sign of two local quadratures. On Gaussian states, such `bit quadrature correlations' majorize entanglement, reducing to an entanglement monotone for pure states. For non-Gaussian states, such as photonic Bell states, ideal and real de-Gaussified photon-subtracted states, and mixtures of pure Gaussian states, the bit correlations are shown to be a {\em monotonic} function of the negativity. This yields a feasible, operational way to quantitatively measure non-Gaussian entanglement in current experiments by means of direct homodyne detection, without a full tomographical reconstruction of the Wigner function.
  • We study the spin dynamics of quasi-one-dimensional F=1 condensates both at zero and finite temperatures for arbitrary initial spin configurations. The rich dynamical evolution exhibited by these non-linear systems is explained by surprisingly simple principles: minimization of energy at zero temperature, and maximization of entropy at high temperature. Our analytical results for the homogeneous case are corroborated by numerical simulations for confined condensates in a wide variety of initial conditions. These predictions compare qualitatively well with recent experimental observations and can, therefore, serve as a guidance for on-going experiments.
  • We study the transfer of quantum information through a Heisenberg spin-1 chain prepared in its ground state. We measure the efficiency of such a quantum channel {\em via} the fidelity of retrieving an arbitrarily prepared state and {\em via} the transfer of quantum entanglement. The Heisenberg spin-1 chain has a very rich quantum phase diagram. We show that the phase boundaries are reflected in sharp variations of the transfer efficiency. In the vicinity of the border between the dimer and the ferromagnetic phase (in the conjectured spin-nematic region), we find strong indications for a qualitative change of the excitation spectrum. Moreover, we identify two regions of the phase diagram which give rise to particularly high transfer efficiency; the channel might be non-classical even for chains of arbitrary length, in contrast to spin-1/2 chains.
  • We propose a method for quantum state transfer in spin chains using an adiabatic passage technique. Modifying even and odd nearest-neighbour couplings in time allows to achieve transfer fidelities arbitrarily close to one, without the need for a precise control of coupling strengths and timing. We study in detail transfer by adiabatic passage in a spin-1 chain governed by a generalized Heisenberg Hamiltonian. We consider optimization of the transfer process applying optimal control techniques. We discuss a realistic experimental implementation using cold atomic gases confined in deep optical lattices.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) refers to specific quantum strategies which permit the secure distribution of a secret key between two parties that wish to communicate secretly. Quantum cryptography has proven unconditionally secure in ideal scenarios and has been successfully implemented using quantum states with finite (discrete) as well as infinite (continuous) degrees of freedom. Here, we analyze the efficiency of QKD protocols that use as a resource entangled gaussian states and gaussian operations only. In this framework, it has already been shown that QKD is possible (M. Navascu\'es et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 010502 (2005)) but the issue of its efficiency has not been considered. We propose a figure of merit (the efficiency $E$) to quantify the number of classical correlated bits that can be used to distill a key from a sample of $N$ entangled states. We relate the efficiency of the protocol to the entanglement and purity of the states shared between the parties.
  • We study entanglement generation via particle transport across a one-dimensional system described by the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. We analyze how the competition between interactions and tunneling affects transport properties and the creation of entanglement in the occupation number basis. Alternatively, we propose to use spatially delocalized quantum bits, where a quantum bit is defined by the presence of a particle either in a site or in the adjacent one. Our results can serve as a guidance for future experiments to characterize entanglement of ultracold gases in one-dimensional optical lattices.