• Kepler-419 is a planetary system discovered by the Kepler photometry which is known to harbour two massive giant planets: [...] Here we present new radial velocity (RV) measurements secured over more than two years with the SOPHIE spectrograph, where both planets are clearly detected. The RV data is modelled together with the Kepler photometry using a photodynamical model. The inclusion of velocity information breaks the $MR^{-3}$ degeneracy inherent in timing data alone, allowing us to measure the absolute stellar and planetary radii and masses. With uncertainties of 12% and 13% for the stellar and inner planet radii, and 35%, 24%, and 35% for the masses of the star, planet b, and planet c respectively, these measurements are the most precise to date for a single host star system using this technique. The transiting planet mass is determined at better precision than the star mass. This shows that modelling the radial velocities and the light curve together in systems of dynamically interacting planets provides a way of characterising both the star and the planets without being limited by knowledge of the star. On the other hand, the period ratio and eccentricities place the Kepler-419 system in a sweet spot; had around twice as many transits been observed, the mass of the transiting planet could have been measured using its own TTVs. Finally, the origin of the Kepler-419 system is discussed. We show that the system is near a coplanar high-eccentricity secular fixed point, related to the alignment of the orbits, which has prevented the inner orbit from circularising. For most other relative apsidal orientations, planet b's orbit would be circular with a semi-major axis of 0.03 au. This suggests a mechanism for forming hot Jupiters in multiplanetary systems without the need of high mutual inclinations.
  • The multi-planetary system HD 106315 was recently found in K2 data . The planets have periods of $P_b \sim9.55$ and $P_c \sim 21.06\,$days, and radii of $ r_b = 2.44 \pm 0.17\, $ and $r_c = 4.35 \pm 0.23\, $ $R_{\oplus}$. The brightness of the host star (V=9.0 mag) makes it an excellent target for transmission spectroscopy. However, to interpret transmission spectra it is crucial to measure the planetary masses. We obtained high precision radial velocities for HD~106315 to determine the mass of the two transiting planets discovered with Kepler K2. Our successful observation strategy was carefully tailored to mitigate the effect of stellar variability. We modelled the new radial velocity data together with the K2 transit photometry and a new ground-based partial transit of HD 106315c to derive system parameters. We estimate the mass of HD 106315b to be 12.6 $\pm$ 3.2 $M_{\oplus}$ and the density to be $4.7 \pm 1.7\, g\,cm^{-3}$, while for HD 106315c we estimate a mass of 15.2 $\pm$ 3.7 $M_{\oplus}$ and a density of $1.01 \pm 0.29\, $g\,cm$^{-3}$. Hence, despite planet c having a radius almost twice as large as planet b, their masses are consistent with one another. We conclude that HD 106315c has a thick hydrogen-helium gaseous envelope. A detailed investigation of HD 106315b using a planetary interior model constrains the core mass fraction to be 5-29\%, and the water mass fraction to be 10-50\%. An alternative, not considered by our model, is that HD 106315b is composed of a large rocky core with a thick H-He envelope. Transmission spectroscopy of these planets will give insight into their atmospheric compositions and also help constrain their core compositions.
  • Transiting super-Earths orbiting bright stars in short orbital periods are interesting targets for the study of planetary atmospheres. While selecting super-Earths suitable for further characterization from the ground among a list of confirmed and validated exoplanets detected by K2, we found some suspicious cases that led to us re-assessing the nature of the detected transiting signal. We did a photometric analysis of the K2 light curves and centroid motions of the photometric barycenters. Our study shows that the validated planets K2-78b, K2-82b, and K2-92b are actually not planets but background eclipsing binaries. The eclipsing binaries are inside the Kepler photometric aperture, but outside the ground-based high resolution images used for validation. We advise extreme care on the validation of candidate planets discovered by space missions. It is important that all the assumptions in the validation process are carefully checked. An independent confirmation is mandatory in order to avoid wasting valuable resources on further characterization of non-existent targets.
  • We report the discovery of the exoplanet K2-110 b (previously EPIC212521166b) from K2 photometry orbiting in a 13.8637d period around an old, metal-poor K3 dwarf star. With a V-band magnitude of 11.9, K2-110 is particularly amenable to RV follow-up. A joint analysis of K2 photometry and high-precision RVs from 28 HARPS and HARPS-N spectra reveal it to have a radius of 2.6$\pm 0.1 R_{\oplus}$ and a mass of 16.7$\pm 3.2$~M$_{\oplus}$, hence a density of $5.2\pm1.2$ g.cm$^{-3}$, making it one of the most massive planets yet to be found with a sub-Neptune radius. When accounting for compression, the resulting Earth-like density is best fitted by a 0.2 M$_{\oplus}$ hydrogen atmosphere over an 16.5 M$_{\oplus}$ Earth-like interior, although the planet could also have significant water content. At 0.1~AU, even taking into account the old stellar age of $8 \pm 3$ Gyr, the planet is unlikely to have been significantly affected by EUV evaporation. However the planet likely disc-migrated to its current position making the lack of a thick H$_2$ atmosphere puzzling. This analysis has made K2-110 b one of the best-characterised mini-Neptunes with density constrained to less than 30%.
  • CoRoT-9b is one of the rare long-period (P=95.3 days) transiting giant planets with a measured mass known to date. We present a new analysis of the CoRoT-9 system based on five years of radial-velocity (RV) monitoring with HARPS and three new space-based transits observed with CoRoT and Spitzer. Combining our new data with already published measurements we redetermine the CoRoT-9 system parameters and find good agreement with the published values. We uncover a higher significance for the small but non-zero eccentricity of CoRoT-9b ($e=0.133^{+0.042}_{-0.037}$) and find no evidence for additional planets in the system. We use simulations of planet-planet scattering to show that the eccentricity of CoRoT-9b may have been generated by an instability in which a $\sim 50~M_\oplus$ planet was ejected from the system. This scattering would not have produced a spin-orbit misalignment, so we predict that CoRoT-9b orbit should lie within a few degrees of the initial plane of the protoplanetary disk. As a consequence, any significant stellar obliquity would indicate that the disk was primordially tilted.
  • High-resolution optical spectroscopy during the transit of HD 189733b, a prototypical hot Jupiter, allowed the resolution of the Na I D sodium lines in the planet, giving access to the extreme conditions of the planet upper atmosphere. We have undertaken HEARTS, a spectroscopic survey of exoplanet upper atmospheres, to perform a comparative study of hot gas giants and determine how stellar irradiation affect them. Here, we report on the first HEARTS observations of the hot Saturn-mass planet WASP-49b. We observed the planet with the HARPS high-resolution spectrograph at ESO 3.6m telescope. We collected 126 spectra of WASP-49, covering three transits of WASP-49b. We analyzed and modeled the planet transit spectrum, while paying particular attention to the treatment of potentially spurious signals of stellar origin. We spectrally resolve the Na I D lines in the planet atmosphere and show that these signatures are unlikely to arise from stellar contamination. The large contrasts of $2.0\pm0.5\%$ (D$_2$) and $1.8\pm0.7\%$ (D$_1$) require the presence of hot neutral sodium ($2,950^{+400}_{-500}$ K) at high altitudes ($\sim$1.5 planet radius or $\sim$45,000 km). From estimating the cloudiness index of WASP-49b, we determine its atmosphere to be cloud free at the altitudes probed by the sodium lines. WASP-49b is close to the border of the evaporation desert and exhibits an enhanced thermospheric signature with respect to a farther-away planet such as HD 189733b.
  • The NASA TESS mission will deliver hundreds of transiting exoplanet candidates orbiting bright stars. The spectrometers SOPHIE at OHP and SPIRou at CFHT will be ideal to obtain radial velocities of these candidates, confirm their nature, and derive the planets' masses. These measurements will be crucial to deliver the best targets for atmospheric characterization with JWST. Here, we calculate the required observing time with SOPHIE, SPIRou, and JWST for each of the TESS targets in order to prepare follow-up observations. To infer their potential for JWST, we restrict the calculations to the case of transmission spectroscopy with NIRISS. The radial velocity follow-up of the giant planets ($R_p > 4 \rm \, R_E$) could be achieved with SOPHIE, with a median observing time of 3.47 hours per target, and a total observing time of 305 hours that includes the 80% most favorable cases. Several small planets ($R_p < 4 \rm \, R_E$) could also be confirmed, but most of them would require an unrealistic time investment. On the other hand, SPIRou is ideally suited to the follow-up of the small planets, with a median observing time of 2.65 hours per target, and a median observing time of 4.70 hours for the terrestrial planets in the habitable zone ($R_p < 2 \rm \, R_E$, $S < 2 \rm \, S_E$). With JWST, the 10% most favorable small planets (184 planets) have a median observing time of 16.2 hours, and the 10% most favorable habitable zone terrestrial planets (7 planets) have a median observing time of 59.7 hours. Overall, this study will help define a follow-up strategy and prepare observation programs with SOPHIE and SPIRou before the first planet candidates are delivered by TESS.
  • The microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 is an exceptionally bright lens binary that was predicted to present radial velocity variation at the level of several km/s. Pioneer radial velocity follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the ESO - VLT of this system clearly ruled out the large radial velocity variation, leaving a discrepancy between the observation and the prediction. In this paper, we further characterise the microlensing system by analysing its spectral energy distribution (SED) derived using the UVES spectrum and new observations with the ARCoIRIS (CTIO) near-infrared spectrograph and the Keck adaptive optics instrument NIRC2 in the J, H, and Ks bands. We determine the mass and distance of the stars independently from the microlensing modelling. We find that the SED is compatible with a giant star in the Galactic bulge and a foreground star with a mass of 0.94+/-0.09Msun at a distance of 1.07+/-0.24kpc. We find that this foreground star is likely the lens. Its parameters are not compatible with the ones previously reported in the literature (0.52+/-0.04Msun at 0.95+/-0.06kpc), based on the microlensing light curve. A thoughtful re-analysis of the microlensing event is mandatory to fully understand the reason of this new discrepancy. More importantly, this paper demonstrates that spectroscopic follow-up observations of microlensing events are possible and provide independent constraints on the parameters of the lens and source stars, hence breaking some degeneracies in the analysis. UV-to-NIR low-resolution spectrographs like X-SHOOTER (ESO - VLT) could substantially contribute to this follow-up efforts, with magnitude limits above all microlensing events detected so far.
  • [Abridged] Context. Stellar activity is an important source of systematic errors and uncertainties in the characterization of exoplanets. Most of the techniques used to correct for this activity focus on an ad hoc data reduction. Aims. We have developed a software for the combined fit of transits and stellar activity features in high-precision long-duration photometry. Our aim is to take advantage of the modelling to derive correct stellar and planetary parameters, even in the case of strong stellar activity. Methods. We use an analytic approach to model the light curve. The code KSint, modified by adding the evolution of active regions, is implemented into our Bayesian modelling package PASTIS. The code is then applied to the light curve of CoRoT-2. The light curve is divided in segments to reduce the number of free parameters needed by the fit. We perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis in two ways. In the first, we perform a global and independent modelling of each segment of the light curve, transits are not normalized and are fitted together with the activity features, and occulted features are taken into account during the transit fit. In the second, we normalize the transits with a model of the non-occulted activity features, and then we apply a standard transit fit, which does not take the occulted features into account. Results. Our model recovers the activity features coverage of the stellar surface and different rotation periods for different features. We find variations in the transit parameters of different segments and show that they are likely due to the division applied to the light curve. Neglecting stellar activity or even only bright spots while normalizing the transits yields a $\sim 1.2\sigma$ larger and $2.3\sigma$ smaller transit depth, respectively. The stellar density also presents up to $2.5\sigma$ differences depending on the normalization technique...
  • Aims: Several studies suggest that the activity level of a planet-host star can be influenced by the presence of a close-by orbiting planet. Moreover, the interaction mechanisms that have been proposed, magnetic interaction and tidal interaction, exhibit a very different dependence on orbital separation between the star and the planet. A detection of activity enhancement and characterization of its dependence on planetary orbital distance can, in principle, allow us to characterize the physical mechanism behind the activity enhancement. Methods: We used the HARPS-N spectrograph to measure the stellar activity level of HD 80606 during the planetary periastron passage and compared the activity measured to that close to apastron. Being characterized by an eccentricity of 0.93 and an orbital period of 111 days, the system's extreme variation in orbital separation makes it a perfect target to test our hypothesis. Results: We find no evidence for a variation in the activity level of the star as a function of planetary orbital distance, as measured by all activity indicators employed log($R'_{HK}$), H$_\alpha$, NaI, and HeI. None of the models employed, whether magnetic interaction or tidal interaction, provides a good description of the data. Conclusions: We find no evidence for star-planet interaction in HD\,80606 at the moment of the periastron passage of its very eccentric planet. The straightforward explanation for the non-detection is the absence of interaction as a result of a low magnetic field strength on either the planet or the star and of the low level of tidal interaction between the two. However, we cannot exclude two scenarios: i) the interaction can be instantaneous and of magnetic origin, being concentrated on the substellar point and its surrounding area, and ii) the interaction can lead to a delayed activity enhancement. (abridged)
  • We report the discovery of EPIC201702477b, a transiting brown dwarf in a long period (40.73691 +/- 0.00037 day) and eccentric (e=0.2281 +/- 0.0026) orbit. This system was initially reported as a planetary candidate based on two transit events seen in K2 Campaign 1 photometry and later validated as an exoplanet. We confirm the transit and refine the ephemeris with two subsequent ground-based detections of the transit using the LCOGT 1m telescope network. We rule out any transit timing variations above the level of 30s. Using high precision radial velocity measurements from HARPS and SOPHIE we identify the transiting companion as a brown dwarf with a mass, radius, and bulk density of 66.9 +/- 1.7 M$_J$, 0.757 +/- 0.065 R$_J$, and 191+/-51 g.cm$^{-3}$ respectively. EPIC201702477b is the smallest radius brown dwarf yet discovered, with a mass just below the H-burning limit. It has the highest density of any planet, substellar mass object or main-sequence star discovered so far. We find evidence in the set of known transiting brown dwarfs for two populations of objects - high mass brown dwarfs and low mass brown dwarfs. The higher-mass population have radii in very close agreement to theoretical models, and show a lower-mass limit around 60 M$_J$. This may be the signature of mass-dependent ejection of systems during the formation process.
  • We report the discovery of the two hot-Jupiters K2-30b and K2-34b. The two planets were detected transiting their main-sequence star with periods $\sim$ 4.099 and $\sim$ 2.996 days, in campaigns 4 and 5 of the extension of the Kepler mission, K2. Subsequent ground-based radial velocity follow-up with SOPHIE, HARPS-N and CAFE, established the planetary nature of the transiting objects. We analyzed the transit signal, radial velocity and spectral energy distributions of the two systems to characterize their properties. Both planets (K2-30b and K2-34b) are bloated hot-Jupiters (1.25 $R_{\rm Jup}$ and 1.33 $R_{\rm Jup}$) around relatively bright (V =13.5 and V=11.5), slow rotating main-sequence (G8 and F9) stars. Thus, these systems are good candidates for detecting the Rossiter-MacLaughlin effect to measure their obliquity and for atmospheric studies.
  • With about 2000 extrasolar planets confirmed, the results show that planetary systems have a whole range of unexpected properties. We present a full investigation of the HD219828 system, a bright metal-rich star for which a hot neptune has previously been detected. We used a set of HARPS, SOPHIE, and ELODIE radial velocities to search for the existence of orbiting companions to HD219828. A dynamical analysis is also performed to study the stability of the system and to constrain the orbital parameters and planet masses. We announce the discovery of a long period (P=13.1years) massive (msini=15.1MJup) companion (HD219828c) in a very eccentric orbit (e=0.81). The same data confirms the existence of a hot-neptune, HD219828b, with a minimum mass of 21 MEarth and a period of 3.83days. The dynamical analysis shows that the system is stable. The HD219828 system is extreme and unique in several aspects. First, among all known exoplanet systems it presents an unusually high mass ratio. We also show that systems like HD219828, with a hot neptune and a long-period massive companion are more frequent than similar systems with a hot jupiter instead. This suggests that the formation of hot neptunes follows a different path than the formation of their hot jovian counterparts. The high mass, long period, and eccentricity of HD219828c also make it a good target for Gaia astrometry as well as a potential target for atmospheric characterisation, using direct imaging or high-resolution spectroscopy. Astrometric observations will allow us to derive its real mass and orbital configuration. If a transit of HD219828b is detected, we will be able to fully characterise the system, including the relative orbital inclinations. With a clearly known mass, HD219828c may become a benchmark object for the range in between giant planets and brown dwarfs.
  • Calen B. Henderson, Radosław Poleski, Matthew Penny, Rachel A. Street, David P. Bennett, David W. Hogg, B. Scott Gaudi, W. Zhu, T. Barclay, G. Barentsen, S. B. Howell, F. Mullally, A. Udalski, M. K. Szymański, J. Skowron, P. Mróz, S. Kozłowski, Ł. Wyrzykowski, P. Pietrukowicz, I. Soszyński, K. Ulaczyk, M. Pawlak, T. Sumi, F. Abe, Y. Asakura, R. K. Barry, A. Bhattacharya, I. A. Bond, M. Donachie, M. Freeman, A. Fukui, Y. Hirao, Y. Itow, N. Koshimoto, M. C. A. Li, C. H. Ling, K. Masuda, Y. Matsubara, Y. Muraki, M. Nagakane, K. Ohnishi, H. Oyokawa, N. Rattenbury, To. Saito, A. Sharan, D. J. Sullivan, P. J. Tristram, A. Yonehara, E. Bachelet, D. M. Bramich, A. Cassan, M. Dominik, R. Figuera Jaimes, K. Horne, M. Hundertmark, S. Mao, C. Ranc, R. Schmidt, C. Snodgrass, I. A. Steele, Y. Tsapras, J. Wambsganss, V. Bozza, M. J. Burgdorf, U. G. Jørgensen, S. Calchi Novati, S. Ciceri, G. D'Ago, D. F. Evans, F. V. Hessman, T. C. Hinse, T.-O. Husser, L. Mancini, A. Popovas, M. Rabus, S. Rahvar, G. Scarpetta, J. Skottfelt, J. Southworth, E. Unda-Sanzana, S. T. Bryson, D. A. Caldwell, M. R. Haas, K. Larson, K. McCalmont, M. Packard, C. Peterson, D. Putnam, L. Reedy, S. Ross, J. E. Van Cleve, R. Akeson, V. Batista, J.-P. Beaulieu, C. A. Beichman, G. Bryden, D. Ciardi, A. Cole, C. Coutures, D. Foreman-Mackey, P. Fouqué, M. Friedmann, C. Gelino, S. Kaspi, E. Kerins, H. Korhonen, D. Lang, C.-H. Lee, C. H. Lineweaver, D. Maoz, J.-B. Marquette, F. Mogavero, J. C. Morales, D. Nataf, R. W. Pogge, A. Santerne, Y. Shvartzvald, D. Suzuki, M. Tamura, P. Tisserand, D. Wang
    March 7, 2016 astro-ph.EP
    $K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\sim$3.7 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\pi_{\rm E}$ for $\gtrsim$127 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in $K2$C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of $WFIRST$.
  • All the fields of the extended space mission Kepler/K2 are located within the ecliptic. Many solar system objects thus cross the K2 stellar masks on a regular basis. We aim at providing to the entire community a simple tool to search and identify solar system objects serendipitously observed by Kepler. The SkyBoT service hosted at IMCCE provides a Virtual Observatory (VO) compliant cone-search that lists all solar system objects present within a field of view at a given epoch. To generate such a list in a timely manner, ephemerides are pre-computed, updated weekly, and stored in a relational database to ensure a fast access. The SkyBoT Web service can now be used with Kepler. Solar system objects within a small (few arcminutes) field of view are identified and listed in less than 10 sec. Generating object data for the entire K2 field of view (14{\deg}) takes about a minute. This extension of the SkyBot service opens new possibilities with respect to mining K2 data for solar system science, as well as removing solar system objects from stellar photometric time-series.
  • We present new radial velocity measurements of eight stars secured with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 193-cm telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory allowing the detection and characterization of new giant extrasolar planets. The host stars are dwarfs of spectral types between F5 and K0 and magnitudes between 6.7 and 9.6; the planets have minimum masses M_p sin i between 0.4 to 3.8 M_Jup and orbital periods of several days to several months. The data allow only single planets to be discovered around the first six stars (HD143105, HIP109600, HD35759, HIP109384, HD220842, and HD12484), but one of them shows the signature of an additional substellar companion in the system. The seventh star, HIP65407, allows the discovery of two giant planets, just outside the 12:5 resonance in weak mutual interaction. The last star, HD141399, was already known to host a four-planetary system; our additional data and analyses allow new constraints to be put on it. We present Keplerian orbits of all systems, together with dynamical analyses of the two multi-planetary systems. HD143105 is one of the brightest stars known to host a hot Jupiter, which could allow numerous follow-up studies to be conducted despite this is not a transiting system. The giant planets HIP109600b, HIP109384b, and HD141399c are located in the habitable zone of their host star.
  • Radial velocity planet search surveys of nearby Solar-type stars have shown a strong deficit of brown dwarf companions within $\sim5\,\mathrm{AU}$. There is presently no comprehensive explanation of this lack of brown dwarf companions, therefore, increasing the sample of such objects is crucial to understand their formation and evolution. Based on precise radial velocities obtained using the SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute-Provence we characterise the orbital parameters of $15$ companions to solar-type stars and constrain their true mass using astrometric data from the Hipparcos space mission. The nine companions not shown to be stellar in nature have minimum masses ranging from ~$13$ to $70\,\mathrm{M}_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, and are well distributed across the planet/brown dwarf mass regime, making them an important contribution to the known population of massive companions around solar-type stars. We characterise six companions as stellar in nature with masses ranging from a minimum mass of $76 \pm 4\,\mathrm{M}_{\mathrm{Jup}}$ to a mass of $0.35 \pm 0.03\,\mathrm{M_\odot}$. The orbital parameters of two previously known sub-stellar candidates are improved.
  • Stellar activity can induce signals in the radial velocities of stars, complicating the detection of orbiting low-mass planets. We present a method to determine the number of planetary signals present in radial-velocity datasets of active stars, using only radial-velocity observations. Instead of considering separate fits with different number of planets, we use a birth-death Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to infer the posterior distribution for the number of planets in a single run. In a natural way, the marginal distributions for the orbital parameters of all planets are also inferred. This method is applied to HARPS data of CoRoT-7. We confidently recover both CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c although the data show evidence for additional signals.
  • In the present paper we report the discovery of a new hot Jupiter, EPIC211089792 b, first detected by the Super-WASP observatory and then by the K2 space mission during its campaign 4. The planet has a period of 3.25d, a mass of 0.73 +/- 0.04 Mjup, and a radius of 1.19 +/- 0.02 Rjup. The host star is a relatively bright (V=12.5) G7 dwarf with a nearby K5V companion. Based on stellar rotation and the abundance of Lithium, we find that the system might be as young as about 450 Myr. The observation of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect shows the planet is aligned with respect to the stellar spin. Given the deep transit (20mmag), the magnitude of the star and the presence of a nearby stellar companion, the planet is a good target for both space- and ground-based transmission spectroscopy, in particular in the near-infrared where the both stars are relatively bright.
  • Stellar metallicity -- as a probe of the metallicity of proto-planetary disks -- is an important ingredient for giant planet formation, likely through its effect on the timescales in which rocky/icy planet cores can form. Giant planets have been found to be more frequent around metal-rich stars, in agreement with predictions based on the core-accretion theory. In the metal-poor regime, however, the frequency of planets, especially low-mass planets, and how it depends on metallicity are still largely unknown. As part of a planet search programme focused on metal-poor stars, we study the targets from this survey that were observed with HARPS on more than 75 nights. The main goals are to assess the presence of low-mass planets and provide a first estimate of the frequency of Neptunes and super-Earths around metal-poor stars. We perform a systematic search for planetary companions, both by analysing the periodograms of the radial-velocities and by comparing, in a statistically-meaningful way, models with an increasing number of Keplerians. A first constraint on the frequency of planets in our metal-poor sample is calculated considering the previous detection (in our sample) of a Neptune-sized planet around HD175607 and one candidate planet (with an orbital period of 68.42d and minimum mass $M_p \sin i = 11.14 \pm 2.47 M_{\oplus}$) for HD87838, announced in the present study. This frequency is determined to be close to 13% and is compared with results for solar-metallicity stars.
  • Long-period brown dwarf companions detected in radial velocity surveys are important targets for direct imaging and astrometry to calibrate the mass-luminosity relation of substellar objects. Through a 20-year radial velocity monitoring of solar-type stars that began with ELODIE and was extended with SOPHIE spectrographs, giant exoplanets and brown dwarfs with orbital periods longer than ten years are discovered. We report the detection of five new potential brown dwarfs with minimum masses between 32 and 83 Jupiter mass orbiting solar-type stars with periods longer than ten years. An upper mass limit of these companions is provided using astrometric Hipparcos data, high-angular resolution imaging made with PUEO, and a deep analysis of the cross-correlation function of the main stellar spectra to search for blend effects or faint secondary components. These objects double the number of known brown dwarf companions with orbital periods longer than ten years and reinforce the conclusion that the occurrence of such objects increases with orbital separation. With a projected separation larger than 100 mas, all these brown dwarf candidates are appropriate targets for high-contrast and high angular resolution imaging.
  • Context. The presence of a small-mass planet (M$_p<$0.1\,M$_{Jup}$) seems, to date, not to depend on metallicity, however, theoretical simulations have shown that stars with subsolar metallicities may be favoured for harbouring smaller planets. A large, dedicated survey of metal-poor stars with the HARPS spectrograph has thus been carried out to search for Neptunes and super-Earths. Aims. In this paper, we present the analysis of \object{HD175607}, an old G6 star with metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.62. We gathered 119 radial velocity measurements in 110 nights over a time span of more than nine years. Methods. The radial velocities were analysed using Lomb-Scargle periodograms, a genetic algorithm, a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis, and a Gaussian processes analysis. The spectra were also used to derive stellar properties. Several activity indicators were analysed to study the effect of stellar activity on the radial velocities. Results. We find evidence for the presence of a small Neptune-mass planet (M$_{p}\sin i = 8.98\pm1.10$\,M$_{\oplus}$) orbiting this star with an orbital period $P = 29.01\pm0.02$\, days in a slightly eccentric orbit ($e=0.11\pm0.08$). The period of this Neptune is close to the estimated rotational period of the star. However, from a detailed analysis of the radial velocities together with the stellar activity, we conclude that the best explanation of the signal is indeed the presence of a planetary companion rather than stellar related. An additional longer period signal ($P\sim 1400$\,d) is present in the data, for which more measurements are needed to constrain its nature and its properties. Conclusions. HD\,175607 is the most metal-poor FGK dwarf with a detected low-mass planet amongst the currently known planet hosts. This discovery may thus have important consequences for planet formation and evolution theories.
  • While giant extrasolar planets have been studied for more than two decades now, there are still some open questions such as their dominant formation and migration process, as well as their atmospheric evolution in different stellar environments. In this paper, we study a sample of giant transiting exoplanets detected by the Kepler telescope with orbital periods up to 400 days. We first defined a sample of 129 giant-planet candidates that we followed up with the SOPHIE spectrograph (OHP, France) in a 6-year radial velocity campaign. This allow us to unveil the nature of these candidates and to measure a false-positive rate of 54.6 +/- 6.5 % for giant-planet candidates orbiting within 400 days of period. Based on a sample of confirmed or likely planets, we then derive the occurrence rates of giant planets in different ranges of orbital periods. The overall occurrence rate of giant planets within 400 days is 4.6 +/- 0.6 %. We recover, for the first time in the Kepler data, the different populations of giant planets reported by radial velocity surveys. Comparing these rates with other yields, we find that the occurrence rate of giant planets is lower only for hot jupiters but not for the longer period planets. We also derive a first measurement on the occurrence rate of brown dwarfs in the brown-dwarf desert with a value of 0.29 +/- 0.17 %. Finally, we discuss the physical properties of the giant planets in our sample. We confirm that giant planets receiving a moderate irradiation are not inflated but we find that they are in average smaller than predicted by formation and evolution models. In this regime of low-irradiated giant planets, we find a possible correlation between their bulk density and the Iron abundance of the host star, which needs more detections to be confirmed.
  • K2-19 is the second multi-planetary system discovered with K2 observations. The system is composed of two Neptune size planets close to the 3:2 mean-motion resonance. To better characterise the system we obtained two additional transit observations of K2-19b and five additional radial velocity observations. These were combined with K2 data and fitted simultaneously with the system dynamics (photo-dynamical model) which increases the precision of the transit time measurements. The higher transit time precision allows us to detect the chopping signal of the dynamic interaction of the planets that in turn permits to uniquely characterise the system. Although the reflex motion of the star was not detected, dynamic modelling of the system allowed us to derive planetary masses of $M_b= 44 \pm 12\, M_{\oplus}$ and $M_c = 15.9 \pm 7.0\, M_{\oplus}$ for the inner and the outer planets respectively, leading to densities close to Uranus. We also show that our method allows the derivation of mass ratios using only the 80 days of observations during the first campaign of K2.
  • We assess a physically feasible explanation for the low number of discovered (near-)grazing planetary transits through all ground and space based transit surveys. We performed simulations to generate the synthetic distribution of detectable planets based on their impact parameter, and found that a larger number of (near-)grazing planets should have been detected than have been detected. Our explanation for the insufficient number of (near-)grazing planets is based on a simple assumption that a large number of (near-)grazing planets transit host stars which harbor dark giant polar spot, and thus the transit light-curve vanishes due to the occultation of grazing planet and the polar spot. We conclude by evaluating the properties required of polar spots in order to make disappear the grazing transit light-curve, and we conclude that their properties are compatible with the expected properties from observations.