• July 10, 2018 astro-ph.HE
    We present the results of our power spectral density analysis for the BL Lac object OJ\,287, utilizing the {\it Fermi}-LAT survey at high-energy $\gamma$-rays, {\it Swift}-XRT in X-rays, several ground-based telescopes and the {\it Kepler} satellite in the optical, and radio telescopes at GHz frequencies. The light curves are modeled in terms of continuous-time auto-regressive moving average (CARMA) processes. Owing to the inclusion of the {\it Kepler} data, we were able to construct \emph{for the first time} the optical variability power spectrum of a blazar without any gaps across $\sim6$ dex in temporal frequencies. Our analysis reveals that the radio power spectra are of a colored-noise type on timescales ranging from tens of years down to months, with no evidence for breaks or other spectral features. The overall optical power spectrum is also consistent with a colored noise on the variability timescales ranging from 117 years down to hours, with no hints of any quasi-periodic oscillations. The X-ray power spectrum resembles the radio and optical power spectra on the analogous timescales ranging from tens of years down to months. Finally, the $\gamma$-ray power spectrum is noticeably different from the radio, optical, and X-ray power spectra of the source: we have detected a characteristic relaxation timescale in the {\it Fermi}-LAT data, corresponding to $\sim 150$\,days, such that on timescales longer than this, the power spectrum is consistent with uncorrelated (white) noise, while on shorter variability timescales there is correlated (colored) noise.
  • A recent Chandra observation of the nearby galaxy cluster Abell 585 has led to the discovery of an extended X-ray jet associated with the high-redshift background quasar B3 0727+409, a luminous radio source at redshift z=2.5. This is one of only few examples of high-redshift X-ray jets known to date. It has a clear extension of about 12", corresponding to a projected length of ~100 kpc, with a possible hot spot located 35" from the quasar. The archival high resolution VLA maps surprisingly reveal no extended jet emission, except for one knot about 1.4" from the quasar. The high X-ray to radio luminosity ratio for this source appears consistent with the $\propto (1+z)^{4}$ amplification expected from the inverse Compton radiative model. This serendipitous discovery may signal the existence of an entire population of similar systems with bright X-ray and faint radio jets at high redshift, a selection bias which must be accounted for when drawing any conclusions about the redshift evolution of jet properties and indeed about the cosmological evolution of supermassive black holes and active galactic nuclei in general.
  • With the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, we performed HI observations of a sample of known X-ray emitting Gigahertz-peaked-spectrum galaxies with compact-symmetric-object morphology (GPS/CSOs) that lacked an HI absorption detection. We combined radio and X-ray data of the full sample of X-ray emitting GPS/CSOs and found a significant, positive correlation between the column densities of the total and neutral hydrogen ($N_{\rm H}$ and $N_{\rm HI}$, respectively). Using a Bayesian approach, we simultaneously quantified the parameters of the $N_{\rm H} - N_{\rm HI}$ relation and the intrinsic spread of the data set. For a specific subset of our sample, we found $N_{\rm H} \propto N_{\rm HI}^b$, with $b=0.93^{+0.49}_{-0.33}$, and $\sigma_{int} (N_{\rm H})= 1.27^{+1.30}_{-0.40}$. The $N_{\rm H} - N_{\rm HI}$ correlation suggests a connection between the physical properties of the radio and X-ray absorbing gas.
  • We report on deep Chandra observations of the nearby broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A, which we combine with new Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations. The new X-ray data have a factor 4 more exposure than observations previously presented and span a 15-year time baseline, allowing a detailed study of the spatial, temporal and spectral properties of the AGN, jet, hotspot and lobes. We present evidence for further time variation of the jet, though the flare that we reported in previous work remains the most significantly detected time-varying feature. We also confirm previous tentative evidence for a faint counterjet. Based on the radio through X-ray spectrum of the jet and its detailed spatial structure, and on the properties of the counterjet, we argue that inverse-Compton models can be conclusively rejected, and propose that the X-ray emission from the jet is synchrotron emission from particles accelerated in the boundary layer of a relativistic jet. For the first time, we find evidence that the bright western hotspot is also time-varying in X-rays, and we connect this to the small-scale structure in the hotspot seen in high-resolution radio observations. The new data allow us to confirm that the spectrum of the lobes is in good agreement with the predictions of an inverse-Compton model and we show that the data favour models in which the filaments seen in the radio images are predominantly the result of spatial variation of magnetic fields in the presence of a relatively uniform electron distribution.
  • Here we analyze radio, optical, and X-ray data for a peculiar cluster Abell 578. This cluster is not fully relaxed and consists of two merging sub-systems. The brightest cluster galaxy, CGPG 0719.8+6704, is a pair of interacting ellipticals with projected separation $\sim$10 kpc, the brighter of which hosts the radio source 4C +67.13. The Fanaroff-Riley type-II radio morphology of 4C +67.13 is unusual for central radio galaxies in local Abell clusters. Our new optical spectroscopy revealed that both nuclei of the CGPG 0719.8+6704 pair are active, albeit at low accretion rates corresponding to the Eddington ratio $\sim10^{-4}$ (for the estimated black hole masses of $\sim 3 \times 10^8\,M_\odot$ and $\sim 10^9 \, M_\odot$). The gathered X-ray ({\it Chandra}) data allowed us to confirm and to quantify robustly the previously noted elongation of the gaseous atmosphere in the dominant sub-cluster, as well as a large spatial offset ($\sim 60$\,kpc projected) between the position of the brightest cluster galaxy and the cluster center inferred from the modeling of the X-ray surface brightness distribution. Detailed analysis of the brightness profiles and temperature revealed also that the cluster gas in the vicinity of 4C\,+67.13 is compressed (by a factor of about $\sim 1.4$) and heated (from $\simeq 2.0$\,keV up to 2.7\,keV), consistent with the presence of a weak shock (Mach number $\sim 1.3$) driven by the expanding jet cocoon. This would then require the jet kinetic power of the order of $\sim 10^{45}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$, implying either a very high efficiency of the jet production for the current accretion rate, or a highly modulated jet/accretion activity in the system.
  • [abridged] Here we present the analysis of multifrequency data gathered for the FRII radio galaxy PKS B1358-113, hosted in the brightest cluster galaxy of Abell 1836. The galaxy harbors one of the most massive black holes known to date and our analysis of the optical data reveals that this black hole is only weakly active. Based on new Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations and archival radio data we derive the preferred range for the jet kinetic luminosity $\sim (0.5-3) \times 10^{45}$ erg s$^{-1}$. This is above the values implied by various scaling relations proposed for radio sources in galaxy clusters, being instead very close to the maximum jet power allowed for the given accretion rate. We constrain the radio source lifetime as $\sim 40-70$ Myrs, and the total amount of deposited jet energy $\sim (2-8) \times 10^{60}$\,ergs. The detailed analysis of the X-ray data provides indication for the presence of a bow-shock driven by the expanding radio lobes into the Abell 1836 cluster environment, with the corresponding Mach number $\sim 2-4$. This, together with the recently growing evidence that powerful FRII radio galaxies may not be uncommon in the centers of clusters at higher redshifts, supports the idea that jet-induced shock heating may indeed play an important role in shaping the properties of clusters, galaxy groups, and galaxies in formation. We speculate on a possible bias against detecting jet-driven shocks in poorer environments, resulting from an inefficient electron heating at the shock front, combined with a relatively long electron-ion equilibration timescale.
  • We discovered an X-ray cluster in a recent pointed Chandra observation of the radio-loud compact-steep-spectrum source 1321+045 at the redshift of 0.263. 1321+045 is part of larger survey which aims to study the X-rays properties of weak compact radio sources. Compact radio sources are young objects at the beginning of their evolution and if embedded in an X-ray cluster offer unique opportunities to study the cluster heating process.
  • We discovered an X-ray cluster in a Chandra observation of the compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio source 1321+045 (z=0.263). CSS sources are thought to be young radio objects at the beginning of their evolution and can potentially test the cluster heating process. 1321+045 is a relatively low luminosity source and its morphology consists of two radio lobes on the opposite sides of a radio core with no evidence for jets or hotspots. The optical emission line ratios are consistent with an interstellar medium (ISM) dominated by AGN-photoionization with a small contribution from star formation, and no contributions from shocks. Based on these ratios, we classify 1321+045 as a low excitation galaxy (LEG) and suggest that its radio activity is in a coasting phase. The X-ray emission associated with the radio source is detected with 36.1+/-8.3 counts, but the origin of this emission is highly uncertain. The current X-ray image of the cluster does not show any signatures of a radio source impact on the cluster medium. Chandra detects the cluster emission at >3 sigma level out to ~60 arcsec (~240 kpc). We obtain the best fit beta model parameters of the surface brightness profile of beta=0.58+/-0.2 and a core radius of 9.4^{+1.1}_{-0.9} arcsec. The average temperature of the cluster is equal to kT=4.4^{+0.5}_{-0.3} keV, with a temperature and cooling profile indicative of a cooling core. We measure the cluster luminosity L_(0.5-2 keV)=3x10^{44} erg s^{-1} and mass 1.5x10^{14} M_sun.
  • We present the X-ray spectral analysis of the 390 brightest extragalactic sources in the Chandra-COSMOS catalog, showing at least 70 net counts in the 0.5-7 keV band. This sample has a 100% completeness in optical-IR identification, with 75% of the sample having a spectroscopic redshift and 25% a photometric redshift. Our analysis allows us to accurately determine the intrinsic absorption, the broad band continuum shape ({\Gamma}) and intrinsic L(2-10) distributions, with an accuracy better than 30% on the spectral parameters for 95% of the sample. The sample is equally divided in type-1 (49.7%) and type-2 AGN (48.7%) plus few passive galaxies at low z. We found a significant difference in the distribution of {\Gamma} of type-1 and type-2, with small intrinsic dispersion, a weak correlation of {\Gamma} with L(2-10) and a large population (15% of the sample) of high luminosity, highly obscured (QSO2) sources. The distribution of the X ray/Optical flux ratio (Log(FX /Fi)) for type-1 is narrow (0 < X/O < 1), while type-2 are spread up to X/O = 2. The X/O correlates well with the amount of X-ray obscuration. Finally, a small sample of Compton thick candidates and peculiar sources is presented. In the appendix we discuss the comparison between Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra for 280 sources in common. We found a small systematic difference, with XMM-Newton spectra that tend to have softer power-laws and lower obscuration.
  • [abridged] We report on Suzaku observations of selected regions within the Southern giant lobe of the radio galaxy Centaurus A. We focus on distinct X-ray features likely associated with fine radio structure of the lobe. We find that the spectral properties of the detected X-ray features are equally consistent with thermal emission from hot gas, or with a power-law radiation continuum. However, the plasma parameters implied by these different models favor a synchrotron origin for the analyzed X-ray spots, indicating that a very efficient acceleration of electrons is taking place within the giant structure of Centaurus A, albeit only in isolated and compact regions. We also present a detailed analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission, resulting in a tentative detection of a soft excess component best fitted by a thermal model with a temperature of 0.5 keV. The exact origin of the observed excess remains uncertain, although energetic considerations point to thermal gas filling the bulk of the volume of the lobe and mixed with the non-thermal plasma. The corresponding pressure of the thermal gas in such a case appears to be in almost exact equipartition with the pressure provided by the radio-emitting electrons and the magnetic field. Although tentative, our findings potentially imply that the structure of the extended lobes in active galaxies is likely to be highly inhomogeneous, with magnetic reconnection processes continuously converting magnetic energy to internal energy of the plasma particles, leading to spatial and temporal variations in the plasma parameters around the equilibrium condition.
  • We report the discovery of a one-sided 3.6" (24 kpc, projected) long jet in the high-redshift, z=4.72, quasar GB 1428+4217 in new Chandra X-ray and VLA radio observations. This is the highest redshift kiloparsec-scale X-ray/radio jet known. Analysis of archival VLBI 2.3 and 8.6 GHz data reveal a faint one-sided jet extending out to ~200 parsecs and aligned to within ~30 deg of the Chandra/VLA emission. The 3.6" distant knot is not detected in an archival HST image, and its broad-band spectral energy distribution is consistent with an origin from inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons for the X-rays. Assuming also equipartition between the radiating particles and magnetic field, the implied jet Lorentz factor is ~5. This is similar to the other two known z ~ 4 kpc-scale X-ray jet cases and smaller than typically inferred in lower-redshift cases. Although there are still but a few such very high-redshift quasar X-ray jets known, for an inverse Compton origin, the present data suggest that they are less relativistic on large-scales than their lower-redshift counterparts.
  • Relativistic jets propagating through an ambient medium must produce some observational effects along their side boundaries because of interactions across the large velocity gradient. One possible effect of such an interaction would be a sheared magnetic field structure at the jet boundaries, leading to a characteristic radio polarization pattern. As proposed by Ostrowski, another effect can come from the generation of a high energy cosmic ray component at the boundary, producing dynamic effects on the medium surrounding the jet and forming a cocoon dominated by cosmic rays with a decreased thermal gas emissivity. We selected this process for our first attempt to look for the effects of this type of interaction. We analyzed the Chandra X-ray data for the radio galaxy M87 in order to verify if the expected regions of diminished emissivity may be present near the spectacular X-ray jet in this source. The detailed analysis of the data, merged from 42 separate observations, shows signatures of lower emissivity surrounding the jet. In particular we detect an intensity dip along the part of the jet, which would be approximately 150 pc x 2 kpc in size, if situated along the jet which is inclined toward us. Due to a highly non-uniform X-ray background in the central region we are not able to claim the discovery of a cosmic ray cocoon around the M87 jet: we only have demonstrated that the data show morphological structures which could be accounted for if a cosmic ray cocoon exists.
  • We present Chandra X-ray and VLA radio observations of the radio galaxy 3C305. The X-ray observations reveal the details of the previously known extended X-ray halo around the radio galaxy. We show using X-ray spectroscopy that the X-ray emission is consistent with being shock-heated material and can be modelled with standard collisional-ionization models, rather than being photoionized by the active nucleus. On this basis, we can make a self-consistent model in which the X-ray-emitting plasma is responsible for the depolarization of some regions of the radio emission from the jets and hotspots, and to place lower and upper limits on the magnetic field strength in the depolarizing medium. On the assumption that the X-ray-emitting material, together with the previously-known extended emission-line region and the outflow in neutral hydrogen, are all being driven out of the centre of the galaxy by an interaction with the jets, we derive a detailed energy budget for the radio galaxy, showing that the X-ray-emitting gas dominates the other phases in terms of its energy content. The power supplied by the jets must be ~ 10^43 erg/s.
  • We present a new sample of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources with radio luminosity below 10^26 W/Hz at 1.4 GHz called the low luminosity compact (LLC) objects. The sources have been selected from FIRST survey and observed with MERLIN at L-band and C-band. The main criterion used for selection was luminosity of the objects and approximately one third of the CSS sources from the new sample have a value of radio luminosity comparable to FRIs. About 80% of the sources have been resolved and about 30% of them have weak extended emission and disturbed structures when compared with the observations of higher luminosity CSS sources. We studied correlation between radio power and linear size, and redshift with a larger sample that included also published samples of compact objects and large scale FRIIs and FRIs. The low luminosity compact objects occupy the space in radio power versus linear size diagram below the main evolutionary path of radio objects. We suggest that many of them might be short-lived objects, and their radio emission may be disrupted several times before becoming FRIIs. We conclude that there exists a large population of short-lived low luminosity compact objects unexplored so far and part of them can be precursors of large scale FRIs.
  • A Chandra X-ray imaging observation of the jet in Pictor A showed a feature that appears to be a flare that faded between 2000 and 2002. The feature was not detected in a follow-up observation in 2009. The jet itself is over 150 kpc long and a kpc wide, so finding year-long variability is surprising. Assuming a synchrotron origin of the observed high-energy photons and a minimum energy condition for the outflow, the synchrotron loss time of the X-ray emitting electrons is of order 1200 yr, which is much longer than the observed variability timescale. This leads to the possibility that the variable X-ray emission arises from a very small sub-volume of the jet, characterized by magnetic field that is substantially larger than the average over the jet.
  • We present new results on X-ray properties of radio loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and focus on broad-band spectral properties of a high ionization BAL (HiBAL) compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio-loud quasar 1045+352. This HiBAL quasar has a very complex radio morphology indicating either strong interactions between a radio jet and the surrounding interstellar medium or a possible re-start of the jet activity. We detected 1045+352 quasar in a short 5 ksec Chandra ACIS-S observation. We applied theoretical models to explain spectral energy distribution (SED) of 1045+352 and argue that non-thermal, inverse-Compton emission from the innermost parts of the radio jet can account for a large fraction of the observed X-ray emission. In our analysis we also consider a scenario in which the observed X-ray emission from radio-loud BAL quasars can be a sum of inverse-Compton jet X-ray emission and optically thin corona X-ray emission. We compiled a sample of radio-loud BAL quasars that were observed in X-rays to date and report no correlation between their X-ray and radio luminosity. However, the radio-loud BAL quasars show a large range of X-ray luminosities and absorption columns. This is consistent with the results obtained earlier for radio-quiet BAL quasars and may indicate an orientation effect in BAL quasars or more complex dependence between X-ray emission, radio emission and an orientation based on the radio morphology.
  • We draw a comparison between AGN and Galactic black hole binaries using a uniform description of spectral energy distribution of these two classes of accreting X-ray sources. We parametrize spectra of GBHs with an alpha_GBH parameter which we define as a slope of a nominal power law function between 3 and 20 keV. We show that this parameter can be treated as an equivalent of the X-ray loudness, alpha_OX, used to describe AGN spectra. We do not find linear correlation between the alpha_GBH and disc flux (similar to that between alpha_OX and optical/UV luminosity found in AGN). Instead, we show that alpha_GBH follows a well defined pattern during a GBH outburst. We find that alpha_GBH tend to cluster around 1, 1.5 and 2, which correspond to a hard, very high/intermediate and soft spectral state, respectively. We conclude that majority of the observed Type 1 radio quiet AGN are in a spectral state corresponding to a very high/intermediate state of GBHs. The same conclusion is valid for radio loud AGN. We also study variations of the spectral slopes (alpha_GBH and the X-ray photon index, Gamma) as a function of disc and Comptonization fluxes. We discuss these dependencies in the context of correlations of alpha_OX and Gamma with the optical/UV and X-ray 2 keV fluxes considered for AGN and quasars.
  • We report on an XMM-Newton observation of the z=1.055 quasar and Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) source 3C 287. Our 62.3 ksec observation provides an exceptional X-ray view of a prominent member of this important subclass of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The X-ray spectra of 3C 287 are consistent with a simple absorbed power-law with a spectral index of Gamma = 1.72 +/- 0.02. Our fits imply a bolometric luminosity of L = 5.8 +/- 0.2 E+45 erg/s over the 0.3-10.0 keV band; this gives a mass lower limit of M > 4.6 E+7 Msun, assuming X-rays contribute 10% of the bolometric luminosity and radiation at the Eddington limit. Iron emission lines are common in the X-ray spectra of many AGN, but the observed spectra appear to rule out strong emission lines in 3C 287. The simple power-law spectrum and absence of strong emission lines may support a picture where our line of sight intersects a relativistic jet. Milliarcsecond radio imaging of 3C 287 appears to support this interpretation. We discuss our results in the context of different AGN sub-classes and the possibility that GPS sources harbor newly-formed black hole jets.
  • We select a sample of 10 radio-quiet quasars with confirmed intranight optical variability and with available X-ray data. We compare the variability properties and the broad band spectral constraints to the predictions of intranight variability by three models: (i) irradiation of an accretion disk by a variable X-ray flux (ii) an accretion disk instability (iii) the presence of a weak blazar component. We concluded that the third model, e.g. the blazar component model, is the most promising if we adopt a cannonball model for the jet variable emission. In this case, the probability of detecting the intranight variability is within 20-80%, depending on the ratio of the disk to the jet optical luminosity. Variable X-ray irradiation mechanism is also possible but only under additional requirement: either the source should have a very narrow Hbeta line or occasional extremely strong flares should appear at very large disk radii.
  • Sgr A* is a source of strongly variable emission in several energy bands. It is generally agreed that this emission comes from the material surrounding the black hole which is either falling in or flowing out. The activity must be driven by accretion but the character of accretion flow in this object is an open question. We suggest that the inflow is dominated by the relatively low angular momentum material originating in one of the nearby group of stars. Such material flows in directly towards the black hole up to the distance of order of ten Schwarzschild radii or less, where it hits the angular momentum barrier which leads naturally to a flow variability. We study both the analytical and the numerical solutions for the flow dynamics, and we analyze the radiation spectra in both cases using the Monte Carlo code to simulate the synchrotron, bremsstrahlung and the Compton scattering. Our model roughly reproduces the broad band spectrum of Sgr A* and its variability if we allow for a small fraction of energy to be converted to non-thermal population of electrons. It is also consistent (for a range of viewing angles) with the strong constraints on the amount of circumnuclear material imposed by the measurements of the Faraday rotation.
  • We describe our efforts to understand large-scale (10's-100's kpc) relativistic jet systems through observations of the highest-redshift quasars. Results from a VLA survey search for radio jets in ~30 z>3.4 quasars are described along with new Chandra observations of 4 selected targets.
  • We investigate the variations of the magnetic field, Doppler factor, and relativistic particle density along the jet of a quasar at z=0.72. We chose 4C 19.44 for this study because of its length and straight morphology. The 18 arcsec length of the jet provides many independent resolution elements in the Chandra X-ray image. The straightness suggests that geometry factors, although uncertain, are almost constant along the jet. We assume the X-ray emission is from inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background. With the aid of assumptions about jet alignment, equipartition between magnetic-field and relativistic-particle energy, and filling factors, we find that the jet is in bulk relativistic motion with a Doppler factor about 6 at an angle no more than 10 degrees to the line of sight over deprojected distances about 150--600 kpc from the quasar, and with a magnetic field approximately 10 micro Gauss.
  • A newly identified kiloparsec-scale X-ray jet in the high-redshift z=3.89 quasar 1745+624 is studied with multi-frequency Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray imaging data. This is only the third large-scale X-ray jet beyond z>3 known and is further distinguished as being the most luminous relativistic jet observed at any redshift, exceeding 10^45 erg/s in both the radio and X-ray bands. Apart from the jet's extreme redshift, luminosity, and high inferred equipartition magnetic field (in comparison to local analogues), its basic properties such as X-ray/radio morphology and radio polarization are similar to lower-redshift examples. Its resolved linear structure and the convex broad-band spectral energy distributions of three distinct knots are also a common feature among known powerful X-ray jets at lower-redshift. Relativistically beamed inverse Compton and `non-standard' synchrotron models have been considered to account for such excess X-ray emission in other jets; both models are applicable to this high-redshift example but with differing requirements for the underlying jet physical properties, such as velocity, energetics, and electron acceleration processes. One potentially very important distinguishing characteristic between the two models is their strongly diverging predictions for the X-ray/radio emission with increasing redshift. This is considered, though with the limited sample of three z>3 jets it is apparent that future studies targeted at very high-redshift jets are required for further elucidation of this issue. Finally, from the broad-band jet emission we estimate the jet kinetic power to be no less than 10^46 erg/s, which is about 10% of the Eddington luminosity corresponding to this galaxy's central [abridged]
  • Stimulated by recent observations of a radio-to-X-ray synchrotron flare from HST-1, the innermost knot of the M 87 jet, as well as by a detection of a very high energy gamma-ray emission from M 87, we investigated the dynamics and multiwavelength emission of the HST-1 region. We study thermal pressure of the hot interstellar medium in M 87 and argue for a presence of a gaseous condensation in its central parts. Interaction of the jet with such a feature is likely to result in formation of a converging reconfinement shock in the innermost parts of the M 87 jet. We show that for a realistic set of the outflow parameters, a stationary and a flaring part of the HST-1 knot located \~100 pc away from the active center can be associated with the decelerated portion of the jet matter placed immediately downstream of the point where the reconfinement shock reaches the jet axis. We discuss a possible scenario explaining a broad-band brightening of the HST-1 region related to the variable activity of the central core. We show that assuming a previous epoch of the high central black hole activity resulting in ejection of excess particles and photons down along the jet, one may first expect a high-energy flare of HST-1 due to inverse-Comptonisation of the nuclear radiation, followed after a few years by an increase in the synchrotron continuum of this region. If this is the case, then the recently observed increase in the knot luminosity in all spectral bands could be regarded as an unusual echo of the outburst that had happened previously in the active core of the M 87 radio galaxy.
  • Several low-power kiloparsec-scale jets in nearby radio galaxies are known for their synchrotron radiation extending up to optical and X-ray photon energies. Here we comment on high-energy gamma-ray emission of one particular object of this kind, i.e. the kiloparsec-scale jet of M 87 radio galaxy, resulting from comptonization of the starlight photon field of the host galaxy by the synchrotron-emitting jet electrons. In the analysis, we include relativistic bulk velocity of the jet, as well as the Klein-Nishina effects. We show, that upper limits to the kiloparsec-scale jet inverse-Compton radiation imposed by HESS and HEGRA Cherenkov Telescopes - which detected a variable source of VHE gamma-ray emission within 0.1 deg (~30 kpc) of the M 87 central region - give us an important constraint on the magnetic field strength in this object, namely that the magnetic field cannot be smaller than the equipartition value (referring solely to the radiating electrons) in the brightest knot of the jet, and most likely, is even stronger. In this context, we point out a need for the amplification of the magnetic energy flux along the M 87 jet from the sub-parsec to kiloparsec scales, suggesting the turbulent dynamo as a plausible process responsible for the aforementioned amplification.