• Uncertainties in nucleosynthesis models originating from uncertainties in astrophysical reaction rates were estimated in a Monte Carlo variation procedure. Thousands of rates were simultaneously varied within individual, temperature-dependent errors to calculate their combined effect on final abundances. After a presentation of the method, results from application to three different nucleosynthesis processes are shown: the $\gamma$-process and the s-process in massive stars, and the main s-process in AGB stars (preliminary results). Thermal excitation of nuclei in the stellar plasma and the combined action of several reactions increase the final uncertainties above the level of the experimental errors. The total uncertainty, on the other hand, remains within a factor of two even in processes involving a large number of unmeasured rates, with some notable exceptions for nuclides whose production is spread over several stellar layers and for s-process branchings.
  • Proton-rich nuclei, the so-called p-nuclei, are made in photodisintegration processes in outer shells of massive stars in the course of the final supernova explosion. Nuclear uncertainties in the production of these nuclei have been quantified in a Monte Carlo procedure. Bespoke temperature-dependent uncertainties were assigned to different types of reactions involving nuclei from Fe to Bi and all rates were varied randomly within the uncertainties. The resulting total production uncertainties of the p-nuclei are below a factor of two, with few exceptions. Key reactions dominating the final uncertainties have been identified in an automated procedure using correlations between rate and abundance uncertainties. Our results are compared to those of a previous study manually varying reaction rates.
  • Nuclear uncertainties in the production of $p$ nuclei in massive stars have been quantified in a Monte Carlo procedure. Bespoke temperature-dependent uncertainties were assigned to different types of reactions involving nuclei from Fe to Bi. Their simultaneous impact was studied in postprocessing explosive trajectories for three different stellar models. It was found that the grid of mass zones in the model of a 25 $M_\odot$ star, which is widely used for investigations of $p$ nucleosynthesis, is too crude to properly resolve the detailed temperature changes required for describing the production of $p$ nuclei. Using models with finer grids for 15 $M_\odot$ and 25 $M_\odot$ stars with initial solar metallicity, it was found that most of the production uncertainties introduced by nuclear reaction uncertainties are smaller than a factor of two. Since a large number of rates were varied at the same time in the Monte Carlo procedure, possible cancellation effects of several uncertainties could be taken into account. Key rates were identified for each $p$ nucleus, which provide the dominant contribution to the production uncertainty. These key rates were found by examining correlations between rate variations and resulting abundance changes. This method is superior to studying flow patterns, especially when the flows are complex, and to individual, sequential variation of a few rates.
  • The 18F(p,\alpha)15O reaction rate is crucial for constraining model predictions of the \gamma-ray observable radioisotope 18F produced in novae. The determination of this rate is challenging due to particular features of the level scheme of the compound nucleus, 19Ne, which result in interference effects potentially playing a significant role. The dominant uncertainty in this rate arises from interference between J\pi=3/2+ states near the proton threshold (Sp = 6.411 MeV) and a broad J\pi=3/2+ state at 665 keV above threshold. This unknown interference term results in up to a factor of 40 uncertainty in the astrophysical S-factor at nova temperatures. Here we report a new measurement of states in this energy region using the 19F(3He,t)19Ne reaction. In stark contrast with previous assumptions we find at least 3 resonances between the proton threshold and Ecm=50 keV, all with different angular distributions. None of these are consistent with J\pi= 3/2+ angular distributions. We find that the main uncertainty now arises from the unknown proton-width of the 48 keV resonance, not from possible interference effects. Hydrodynamic nova model calculations performed indicate that this unknown width affects 18F production by at least a factor of two in the model considered.
  • The DRIFT collaboration utilizes low pressure gaseous detectors to search for WIMP dark matter with directional signatures. A 252Cf neutron source was placed on each of the principal axes of a DRIFT detector in order to test its ability to measure directional signatures from the three components of very low energy (~keV/amu) recoil ranges. A high trigger threshold and the event selection procedure ensured that only sulfur recoils were analyzed. Sulfur recoils produced in the CS2 target gas by the 252Cf source closely match those expected from massive WIMP induced sulfur recoils. For each orientation of the source a directional signal from the range components was observed, indicating that the detector is directional along all 3 axes. An analysis of these results yields an optimal orientation for DRIFT detectors when searching for a directional signature from WIMPs. Additional energy dependent information is provided to aid in understanding this effect.
  • Results are presented from the first underground data run of ZEPLIN-II, a 31 kg two phase xenon detector developed to observe nuclear recoils from hypothetical weakly interacting massive dark matter particles. Discrimination between nuclear recoils and background electron recoils is afforded by recording both the scintillation and ionisation signals generated within the liquid xenon, with the ratio of these signals being different for the two classes of event. This ratio is calibrated for different incident species using an AmBe neutron source and Co-60 gamma-ray sources. From our first 31 live days of running ZEPLIN-II, the total exposure following the application of fiducial and stability cuts was 225 kgxdays. A background population of radon progeny events was observed in this run, arising from radon emission in the gas purification getters, due to radon daughter ion decays on the surfaces of the walls of the chamber. An acceptance window, defined by the neutron calibration data, of 50% nuclear recoil acceptance between 5 keVee and 20 keVee, had an observed count of 29 events, with a summed expectation of 28.6+/-4.3 gamma-ray and radon progeny induced background events. These figures provide a 90% c.l. upper limit to the number of nuclear recoils of 10.4 events in this acceptance window, which converts to a WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross-section with a minimum of 6.6x10^-7 pb following the inclusion of an energy dependent, calibrated, efficiency. A second run is currently underway in which the radon progeny will be eliminated, thereby removing the background population, with a projected sensitivity of 2x10^-7 pb for similar exposures as the first run.