• We present the first results from an on-going survey to characterize the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of the massive high-redshift galaxies detected as submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We constructed a parent sample of 163 SMG-QSO pairs with separations less than $\sim$36 arcsec by cross-matching far-infrared-selected galaxies from Herschel with spectroscopically confirmed QSOs. The Herschel sources were selected to match the properties of SMGs. We determined the sub-arcsecond positions of six Herschel sources with the Very Large Array and obtained secure redshift identification for three of those with near-infrared spectroscopy. The QSO sightlines probe transverse proper distances of 112, 157, and 198 kpc at foreground redshifts of 2.043, 2.515, and 2.184, respectively, which are comparable to the virial radius of the $\sim10^{13}$ Msun halos expected to host SMGs. High-quality absorption-line spectroscopy of the QSOs reveals systematically strong HI Lyman-alpha absorption around all three SMGs, with rest-frame equivalent widths of $\sim2-3$ \AA. However, none of the three absorbers exhibits compelling evidence for optically thick HI gas or metal absorption, in contrast to the dominance of strong neutral absorbers in the CGM of luminous $z \sim 2$ QSOs. The low covering factor of optically thick HI gas around SMGs tentatively indicates that SMGs may not have as prominent cool gas reservoirs in their halos as the co-eval QSOs and that they may inhabit less massive halos than previously thought.
  • We present a detailed analysis of a red quasar at z=2.32 with an intervening damped Lyman-alpha absorber (DLA) at z=2.13. Using high quality data from the X-shooter spectrograph at ESO Very Large Telescope we find that the absorber has a metallicity consistent with Solar. We observe strong C I and H$_2$ absorption indicating a cold, dense absorbing medium. Partial coverage effects are observed in the C I lines, from which we infer a covering fraction of $27 \pm 6$ % and a physical diameter of the cloud of 0.1 pc. From the covering fraction and size, we estimate the size of the background quasar's broad line region. We search for emission from the DLA counterpart in optical and near-infrared imaging. No emission is observed in the optical data. However, we see tentative evidence for a counterpart in the H and K' band images. The DLA shows high depletion (as probed by [Fe/Zn]=-1.22) indicating that significant amounts of dust must be present in the DLA. By fitting the spectrum with various dust reddened quasar templates we find a best-fitting amount of dust in the DLA of $A(V)_{\rm DLA}=0.28 \pm 0.01|_{\rm stat} \pm 0.07|_{\rm sys}$. We conclude that dust in the DLA is causing the colours of this intrinsically very luminous background quasar to appear much redder than average quasars, thereby not fulfilling the criteria for quasar identification in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Such chemically enriched and dusty absorbers are thus underrepresented in current samples of DLAs.
  • Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. But determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kpc-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 square deg covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5" (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the H-alpha-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ~60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion.
  • From a set of adaptive optics (AO) observations collected with the W.M. Keck telescope between August and September 2009, we derived the orbital parameters of the most recently discovered satellites of the large C-type asteroid (93) Minerva. The satellites of Minerva, which are approximately 3 and 4 km in diameter, orbit very close to the primary $\sim$5 & $\sim$8 $\times$ Rp and $\sim$1% & $\sim$2% $\times$ RHill) in a circular manner, sharing common characteristics with most of the triple asteroid systems in the main-belt. Combining these AO observations with lightcurve data collected since 1980 and two stellar occultations in 2010 & 2011, we removed the ambiguity of the pole solution of Minerva's primary and showed that it has an almost regular shape with an equivalent diameter Deq = 154 $\pm$ 6 km in agreement with IRAS observations. The surprisingly high bulk density of 1.75 $\pm$ 0.30 g/cm$\^3$ for this C-type asteroid, suggests that this taxonomic class is composed of asteroids with different compositions, For instance, Minerva could be made of the same material as dry CR, CO, and CV meteorites. We discuss possible scenarios on the origin of the system and conclude that future observations may shine light on the nature and composition of this fifth known triple main-belt asteroid.
  • Supernova (SN) 2009ig was discovered 17 hours after explosion by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, promptly classified as a normal Type Ia SN (SN Ia), peaked at V = 13.5 mag, and was equatorial, making it one of the foremost supernovae for intensive study in the last decade. Here, we present ultraviolet (UV) and optical observations of SN 2009ig, starting about 1 day after explosion until around maximum brightness. Our data include excellent UV and optical light curves, 25 premaximum optical spectra, and 8 UV spectra, including the earliest UV spectrum ever obtained of a SN Ia. SN 2009ig is a relatively normal SN Ia, but does display high-velocity ejecta - the ejecta velocity measured in our earliest spectra (v ~ -23,000 km/s for Si II 6355) is the highest yet measured in a SN Ia. The spectral evolution is very dramatic at times earlier than 12 days before maximum brightness, but slows after that time. The early-time data provide a precise measurement of 17.13 +/- 0.07 days for the SN rise time. The optical color curves and early-time spectra are significantly different from template light curves and spectra used for light-curve fitting and K-corrections, indicating that the template light curves and spectra do not properly represent all Type Ia supernovae at very early times. In the age of wide-angle sky surveys, SNe like SN 2009ig that are nearby, bright, well positioned, and promptly discovered will still be rare. As shown with SN 2009ig, detailed studies of single events can provide significantly more information for testing systematic uncertainties related to SN Ia distance estimates and constraining progenitor and explosion models than large samples of more distant SNe.
  • Supernova (SN) 2008ax in NGC 4490 was discovered within hours after shock breakout, presenting the rare opportunity to study a core-collapse SN beginning with the initial envelope-cooling phase immediately following shock breakout. We present an extensive sequence of optical and near-infrared spectra, as well as three epochs of optical spectropolarimetry. Our initial spectra, taken two days after shock breakout, are dominated by hydrogen Balmer lines at high velocity. However, by maximum light, He I lines dominated the optical and near-infrared spectra, which closely resembled those of normal Type Ib supernovae (SNe Ib) such as SN 1999ex. This spectroscopic transition defines Type IIb supernovae, but the strong similarity of SN 2008ax to normal SNe Ib beginning near maximum light, including an absorption feature near 6270A due to H-alpha at high velocities, suggests that many objects classified as SNe Ib in the literature may have ejected similar amounts of hydrogen as SN 2008ax, roughly a few x 0.01 M_sun. Early-time spectropolarimetry (6 and 9 days after shock breakout) revealed strong line polarization modulations of 3.4% across H-alpha, indicating the presence of large asphericities in the outer ejecta. The continuum shares a common polarization angle with the hydrogen, helium, and oxygen lines, while the calcium and iron absorptions are oriented at different angles. This is clear evidence of deviations from axisymmetry even in the outer ejecta. Intrinsic continuum polarization of 0.64% only nine days after shock breakout shows that the outer layers of the ejecta were quite aspherical. A single epoch of late-time spectropolarimetry, as well as the shapes of the nebular line profiles, demonstrate that asphericities extended from the outermost layers all the way down to the center of this SN. [Abridged]
  • We present extensive early photometric (ultraviolet through near-infrared) and spectroscopic (optical and near-infrared) data on supernova (SN) 2008D as well as X-ray data analysis on the associated Swift/X-ray transient (XRT) 080109. Our data span a time range of 5 hours before the detection of the X-ray transient to 150 days after its detection, and detailed analysis allowed us to derive constraints on the nature of the SN and its progenitor; throughout we draw comparisons with results presented in the literature and find several key aspects that differ. We show that the X-ray spectrum of XRT 080109 can be fit equally well by an absorbed power law or a superposition of about equal parts of both power law and blackbody. Our data first established that SN 2008D is a spectroscopically normal SN Ib (i.e., showing conspicuous He lines), and show that SN 2008D had a relatively long rise time of 18 days and a modest optical peak luminosity. The early-time light curves of the SN are dominated by a cooling stellar envelope (for \Delta t~0.1- 4 day, most pronounced in the blue bands) followed by 56^Ni decay. We construct a reliable measurement of the bolometric output for this stripped-envelope SN, and, combined with estimates of E_K and M_ej from the literature, estimate the stellar radius R_star of its probable Wolf-Rayet progenitor. According to the model of Waxman et al. and of Chevalier & Fransson, we derive R_star^{W07}= 1.2+/-0.7 R_sun and R_star^{CF08}= 12+/-7 R_sun, respectively; the latter being more in line with typical WN stars. Spectra obtained at 3 and 4 months after maximum light show double-peaked oxygen lines that we associate with departures from spherical symmetry, as has been suggested for the inner ejecta of a number of SN Ib cores.
  • We report the results from a comprehensive study of 74 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and 34 Palomar-Green (PG) quasars within z ~ 0.3$ observed with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). The contribution of nuclear activity to the bolometric luminosity in these systems is quantified using six independent methods that span a range in wavelength and give consistent results within ~ +/-10-15% on average. The average derived AGN contribution in ULIRGs is ~35-40%, ranging from ~15-35% among "cool" (f_25/f_60 =< 0.2) optically classified HII-like and LINER ULIRGs to ~50 and ~75% among warm Seyfert 2 and Seyfert 1 ULIRGs, respectively. This number exceeds ~80% in PG QSOs. ULIRGs fall in one of three distinct AGN classes: (1) objects with small extinctions and large PAH equivalent widths are highly starburst-dominated; (2) systems with large extinctions and modest PAH equivalent widths have larger AGN contributions, but still tend to be starburst-dominated; and (3) ULIRGs with both small extinctions and small PAH equivalent widths host AGN that are at least as powerful as the starbursts. The AGN contributions in class 2 ULIRGs are more uncertain than in the other objects, and we cannot formally rule out the possibility that these objects represent a physically distinct type of ULIRGs. A morphological trend is seen along the sequence (1)-(2)-(3), in general agreement with the standard ULIRG - QSO evolution scenario and suggestive of a broad peak in extinction during the intermediate stages of merger evolution. However, the scatter in this sequence, implies that black hole accretion, in addition to depending on the merger phase, also has a strong chaotic/random component, as in local AGN. (abridged)
  • The Triangulum Spiral Galaxy Messier 33 offers unique insights into the building of a galactic disk. We identify spectacular arcs of intermediate age (0.6 Gyr - 2 Gyr) stars in the low-metallicity outer disk. The northern arc spans approx. 120 degrees in azimuth and up to 5 arcmin in width. The arcs are located 2-3 disk scale lengths from the galaxy centre (where 1 disk scale length is equivalent to 0.1 degrees in the V-band) and lie precisely where there is a warp in the HI profile of M33. Warps and infall are inextricably linked (Binney, 1992). We present spectroscopy of candidate stars in the outer northern arc, secured using the Keck I telescope in Hawaii. The target stars have estimated visual magnitudes as faint as V ~ 25m. Absorption bands of CN are seen in all spectra reported in this review talk, confirming their carbon star status. Also presented are PAH emissivity radial profiles generated from IRAC observations of M33 using the Spitzer Space Telescope. A dramatic change of phase in the m=2 Fourier component is detected at the domain of the arcs. M33 serves as an excellent example how the disks of spiral galaxies in our Universe are built: as dynamically open systems, growing from the inward, outward.
  • We report near-infrared (primarily H-band) adaptive optics (AO) imaging with the Gemini-N and Subaru Telescopes, of a representative sample of 32 nearby (z<0.3) QSOs selected from the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS), in order to investigate the properties of the host galaxies. 2D modeling and visual inspection of the images shows that ~36% of the hosts are ellipticals, \~39% contain a prominent disk component, and ~25% are of undetermined type. 30% show obvious signs of disturbance. The mean M_H(host) = -24.82 (2.1L_H*), with a range -23.5 to -26.5 (~0.63 to 10 L_H*). At <L_H*, all hosts have a dominant disk component, while at >2 L_H* most are ellipticals. "Disturbed" hosts are found at all M_H(host), while "strongly disturbed" hosts appear to favor the more luminous hosts. Hosts with prominent disks have less luminous QSOs, while the most luminous QSOs are almost exclusively in ellipticals or in mergers (which presumably shortly will be ellipticals). At z<0.13, where our sample is complete at B-band, we find no clear correlation between M_B(QSO) and M_H(host). However, at z>0.15, the more luminous QSOs (M_B<-24.7), and 4/5 of the radio-loud QSOs, have the most luminous H-band hosts (>7L_H*), most of which are ellipticals. Finally, we find a strong correlation between the "infrared-excess", L_IR/L_BB, of QSOs with host type and degree of disturbance. Disturbed and strongly disturbed hosts and hosts with dominant disks have L_IR/L_BB twice that of non-disturbed and elliptical hosts, respectively. QSOs with "disturbed" and "strongly-disturbed" hosts are also found to have morphologies and mid/far-infrared colors that are similar to what is found for "warm" ultraluminous infrared galaxies, providing further evidence for a possible evolutionary connection between both classes of objects.