• We show, by solving Maxwell's equations, that an electric charge on the surface of a slab of a linear magnetoelectric material generates an image magnetic monopole below the surface provided that the magnetoelectric has a diagonal component in its magnetoelectric response. The image monopole, in turn, generates an ideal monopolar magnetic field outside of the slab. Using realistic values of the electric- and magnetic- field susceptibilties, we calculate the magnitude of the effect for the prototypical magnetoelectric material Cr$_2$O$_3$. We use low energy muon spin rotation to measure the strength of the magnetic field generated by charged muons as a function of their distance from the surface of a Cr$_2$O$_3$ films, and show that the results are consistent with the existence of the monopole. We discuss other possible routes to detecting the monopolar field, and show that, while the predicted monopolar field generated by Cr$_2$O$_3$ is above the detection limit for standard magnetic force microscopy, detection of the field using this technique is prevented by surface charging effects.
  • Equilibrium magnetic properties of the mixed state in type-II superconductors were measured with high purity bulk and film niobium samples in parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields using dc magnetometry and scanning Hall-probe microscopy. Equilibrium magnetization data for the perpendicular geometry were obtained for the first time. It was found that none of the existing theories is consistent with these new data. To address this problem, a theoretical model is developed and experimentally validated. The new model describes the mixed state in an averaged limit, i.e. %without detailing the samples' magnetic structure and therefore ignoring interactions between vortices. It is quantitatively consistent with the data obtained in a perpendicular field and provides new insights on properties of vortices. % and the entire mixed state. At low values of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter, the model converts to that of Peierls and London for the intermediate state in type-I superconductors. It is shown that description of the vortex matter in superconductors in terms of a 2D gas is more appropriate than the frequently used crystal- and glass-like scenarios.
  • The importance of accounting for the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field distribution and roundness of domain walls near the surface of type-I superconductors in the Intermediate State (IS) for forming the equilibrium flux structure was demonstrated by Landau eight decades ago. Further studies confirmed this prediction and extended it to all equilibrium properties of the IS. Here we report on direct measurements of the field distribution and shape of domains near the surface of high-purity type-I (indium) films in perpendicular field using Low-Energy muon Spin Rotation spectroscopy. We found that at low applied fields (in about half of the IS field range) the field distribution and domains' shape agrees with that proposed by Tinkham. However for high fields our data suggest that reality can differ from theoretical expectations. In particular, the width of the superconducting laminae can expand near the surface leading to formation of a maximum in the static magnetic field in the current-free space outside the sample. We speculate that the apparent contradiction of our observations with classical electrodynamics is due to the inapplicability of the standard boundary conditions to the vicinity of an "active" superconductor.
  • The understanding of the interplay between different orders in a solid is a key challenge in highly correlated electronic systems. In real systems this is even more difficult since disorder can have a strong influence on the subtle balance between these orders and thus can obscure the interpretation of the observed physical properties. Here we present a study on delta-doped La2CuO4 superlattices. By means of molecular beam epitaxy whole LaO-layers were periodically replaced through SrO-layers providing a charge reservoir, yet reducing the level of disorder typically present in doped cuprates to an absolute minimum. The induced superconductivity and its interplay with the antiferromagnetic order is studied by means of low-energy muSR. We find a quasi-2D superconducting state which couples to the antiferromagnetic order in a non-trivial way. Below the superconducting transition temperature, the magnetic volume fraction increases strongly. The reason could be a charge redistribution of the free carriers due to the opening of the superconducting gap which is possible due to the close proximity and low disorder between the different ordered regions.
  • The standard interpretation of the phase diagram of type-II superconductors was developed in 1960s and has since been considered a well-established part of classical superconductivity. However, upon closer examination a number of fundamental issues arise that leads one to question this standard picture. To address these issues we studied equilibrium properties of niobium samples near and above the upper critical field Hc2 in parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields. The samples investigated were very high quality films and single crystal discs with the Ginzburg-Landau parameters 0.8 and 1.3, respectively. A range of complementary measurements have been performed, which include dc magnetometry, electrical transport, muSR spectroscopy and scanning Hall-probe microscopy. Contrarily to the standard scenario, we observed that a superconducting phase is present in the sample bulk above Hc2 and the field Hc3 is the same in both parallel and perpendicular fields. Our findings suggest that above Hc2 the superconducting phase forms filaments parallel to the field regardless on the field orientation. Near Hc2 the filaments preserve the hexagonal structure of the preceding vortex lattice of the mixed state and the filament density continuously falls to zero at Hc3. Our work has important implications for the correct interpretation of properties of type-II superconductors and can also be essential for practical applications of these materials.
  • We present a detailed investigation of the temperature and depth dependence of the magnetic properties of 3D topological Kondo insulator SmB6 , in particular near its surface. We find that local magnetic field fluctuations detected in the bulk are suppressed rapidly with decreasing depths, disappearing almost completely at the surface. We attribute the magnetic excitations to spin excitons in bulk SmB6 , which produce local magnetic fields of about ~1.8 mT fluctuating on a time scale of ~60 ns. We find that the excitonic fluctuations are suppressed when approaching the surface on a length scale of 40-90 nm, accompanied by a small enhancement in static magnetic fields. We associate this length scale to the size of the excitonic state.
  • Here we present a study of magnetism in \CTO\ anatase films grown by pulsed laser deposition under a variety of oxygen partial pressures and deposition rates. Energy-dispersive spectrometry and transition electron microscopy analyses indicate that a high deposition rate leads to a homogeneous microstructure, while very low rate or postannealing results in cobalt clustering. Depth resolved low-energy muon spin rotation experiments show that films grown at a low oxygen partial pressure ($\approx 10^{-6}$ torr) with a uniform structure are fully magnetic, indicating intrinsic ferromagnetism. First principles calculations identify the beneficial role of low oxygen partial pressure in the realization of uniform carrier-mediated ferromagnetism. This work demonstrates that Co:TiO$_2$ is an intrinsic diluted magnetic semiconductor.
  • We investigated the depth dependence of current-induced magnetic fields in a bilayer of a normal metal (Au) and a ferrimagnetic insulator (Yttrium Iron Garnet - YIG) by using low energy muon spectroscopy (LE-muSR). This allows us to explore how these fields vary from the Au surface down to the buried Au|YIG interface, which is relevant to study physics like the spin-Hall effect. We observed a maximum shift of 0.4 G in the internal field of muons at the surface of Au film which is in close agreement to the value expected for Oersted fields. As muons are implanted closer to the Au|YIG interface the shift is strongly suppressed, which we attribute to the dipolar fields present at the Au|YIG interface. Combining our measurements with modelling, we show that dipolar fields caused by the finite roughness of the Au|YIG interface consistently explains our observations. Our results, therefore, gauge the limits on the spatial resolution and the sensitivity of LE-muSR to the roughness of the buried magnetic interfaces, a prerequisite for future studies addressing current induced fields caused by the spin-Hall effect.
  • We present the results of transverse-field muon-spin rotation measurements on an epitaxially grown 40 nm-thick film of MnSi on Si(111) in the region of the field-temperature phase diagram where a skyrmion phase has been observed in the bulk. We identify changes in the quasistatic magnetic field distribution sampled by the muon, along with evidence for magnetic transitions around $T\approx 40$ K and 30 K. Our results suggest that the cone phase is not the only magnetic texture realized in film samples for out-of-plane fields.
  • Superconducting spintronics has emerged in the last decade as a promising new field that seeks to open a new dimension for nanoelectronics by utilizing the internal spin structure of the superconducting Cooper pair as a new degree of freedom. Its basic building blocks are spin-triplet Cooper pairs with equally aligned spins, which are promoted by proximity of a conventional superconductor to a ferromagnetic material with inhomogeneous macroscopic magnetization. Using low-energy muon spin rotation experiments, we find an entirely unexpected novel effect: the appearance of a magnetization in a thin layer of a non-magnetic metal (gold), separated from a ferromagnetic double layer by a 50 nm thick superconducting layer of Nb. The effect can be controlled by either temperature or by using a magnetic field to control the state of the remote ferromagnetic elements and may act as a basic building block for a new generation of quantum interference devices based on the spin of a Cooper pair.
  • Superconductors are a striking example of a quantum phenomenon in which electrons move coherently over macroscopic distances without scattering. The high-temperature superconducting oxides(cuprates) are the most studied class of superconductors, composed of two-dimensional CuO2 planes separated by other layers which control the electron concentration in the planes. A key unresolved issue in cuprates is the relationship between superconductivity and magnetism. In this paper, we report a sharp phase boundary of static three-dimensional magnetic order in the electron-doped superconductor La2-xCexCuO4-d where small changes in doping or depth from the surface switch the material from superconducting to magnetic. Using low-energy spin polarized muons, we find static magnetism disappears close to where superconductivity begins and well below the doping where dramatic changes in the transport properties are reported. These results indicate a higher degree of symmetry between the electron and hole-doped cuprates than previously thought.
  • The characteristics of shallow hydrogen-like muonium (Mu) states in nominally undoped ZnO and CdS (0001) crystals have been studied close to the surface at depths in the range of 10 nm - 180 nm by using low-energy muons, and in the bulk using conventional muSR. The muon implantation depths are adjusted by tuning the energy of the low-energy muons between 2.5 keV and 30 keV. We find that the bulk ionization energy of the shallow donor-like Mu state is lowered by about 10 meV at a depth of 100 nm, and continuously decreasing on approaching the surface. At a depth of about 10 nm the ionization energy is further reduced by 25-30 meV compared to its bulk value. We attribute this change to the presence of electric fields due to band bending close to the surface, and we determine the depth profile of the electric field within a simple one-dimensional model.
  • We present a direct spectroscopic observation of a shallow hydrogen-like muonium state in SrTiO$_3$ which confirms the theoretical prediction that interstitial hydrogen may act as a shallow donor in this material. The formation of this muonium state is temperature dependent and appears below $\sim 70$ K. From the temperature dependence we estimate an activation energy of $\sim 50$ meV in the bulk and $\sim 23$ meV near the free surface. The field and directional dependence of the muonium precession frequencies further supports the shallow impurity state with a rare example of a fully anisotropic hyperfine tensor. From these measurements we determine the strength of the hyperfine interaction and propose that the muon occupies an interstitial site near the face of the oxygen octahedron in SrTiO$_3$. The observed shallow donor state provides new insight for tailoring the electronic and optical properties of SrTiO$_{3}$-based oxide interface systems.
  • We have characterized a film of Ge_0.9Mn_0.1 forming self-organized nanocolumns perpendicular to the Ge substrate with high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy, and bulk magnetization and positive muon spin rotation and relaxation (muSR) measurements. The Mn-rich nanocolumns form a triangular lattice with no detectable Mn atoms in the matrix. They consist of cores surrounded by shells. The combined analysis of bulk magnetization and muSR data enables us to characterize the electronic and magnetic properties of both the cores and shells. The discovered phase separation of the columns between a core and a shell is probably relevant for other transition-metal doped semiconductors.
  • Transverse-field muon-spin rotation ($\mu$SR) experiments were performed on a single crystal sample of the non-centrosymmetric system MnSi. The observed angular dependence of the muon precession frequencies matches perfectly the one of the Mn-dipolar fields acting on the muons stopping at a 4a position of the crystallographic structure. The data provide a precise determination of the magnetic dipolar tensor. In addition, we have calculated the shape of the field distribution expected below the magnetic transition temperature $T_C$ at the 4a muon-site when no external magnetic field is applied. We show that this field distribution is consistent with the one reported by zero-field $\mu$SR studies. Finally, we present ab initio calculations based on the density-functional theory which confirm the position of the muon stopping site inferred from transverse-field $\mu$SR. In view of the presented evidence we conclude that the $\mu$SR response of MnSi can be perfectly and fully understood without invoking a hypothetical magnetic polaron state.
  • Adding Au nanoparticles to YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-\delta}$ thin films leads to an increase of the superconducting transition temperature $T_{\rm c}$ and the critical current density $j_{\rm c}$. While the higher $j_{\rm c}$ can be understood in terms of a stronger pinning of the flux vortices at the Au nanoparticles, the enhanced $T_{\rm c}$ is still puzzling. In the present study, we determined the microscopic magnetic penetration profiles and the corresponding London penetration depths $\lambda_{\rm L}$ in the Meissner state of optimally doped YBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7-\delta}$ thin films with and without Au nanoparticles by low-energy muon spin rotation. By Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we show that the Au nanoparitcles are distributed over the whole thickness of the thin-film samples. The superfluid density $n_{\rm s} \propto 1/\lambda_{\rm L}^2$ was found to increase in the films containing Au nanoparticles. We attribute this increase of $n_{\rm s}$ to a reduction of the defect density possibly due to defect condensation at the Au nanoparticles.
  • The controlled manipulation of the charge carrier concentration in nanometer thin layers is the basis of current semiconductor technology and of fundamental importance for device applications. Here we show that it is possible to induce a persistent inversion from n- to p-type in a 200-nm-thick surface layer of a germanium wafer by illumination with white and blue light. We induce the inversion with a half-life of ~12 hours at a temperature of 220 K which disappears above 280 K. The photo-induced inversion is absent for a sample with a 20-nm-thick gold capping layer providing a Schottky barrier at the interface. This indicates that charge accumulation at the surface is essential to explain the observed inversion. The contactless change of carrier concentration is potentially interesting for device applications in opto-electronics where the gate electrode and gate oxide could be replaced by the semiconductor surface.
  • We investigate "hot" regions with anomalous high field dissipation in bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators by using low energy muon spin rotation (LE-$\mu$SR) on corresponding cavity cutouts. We demonstrate that superconducting properties at the hot region are well described by the non-local Pippard/BCS model for niobium in the clean limit with a London penetration depth $\lambda_\mathrm{L} = 23 \pm 2$ nm. In contrast, a cutout sample from the 120$^\circ$C baked cavity shows a much larger $\lambda > 100$ nm and a depth dependent mean free path, likely due to gradient in vacancy concentration. We suggest that these vacancies can efficiently trap hydrogen and hence prevent the formation of hydrides responsible for rf losses in hot regions.
  • We report the results of a search for spontaneous magnetism due to a time reversal symmetry breaking phase in the superconducting state of (110)-oriented YBCO films, expected near the surface in this geometry. Zero field and weak transverse field measurements performed using the low-energy muon spin rotation technique with muons implanted few nm inside optimally-doped YBCO-(110) films show no appearance of spontaneous magnetic fields below the superconducting temperature down to 2.9 K. Our results give an upper limit of ~0.02 mT for putative spontaneous internal fields.
  • The magnetic phase diagram of La2-xSrxCuO4 thin-films grown on single-crystal LaSrAlO4 substrates has been determined by low-energy muon-spin rotation. The diagram shows the same features as the one of bulk La2-xSrxCuO4, but the transition temperatures between distinct magnetic states are significantly different. In the antiferromagnetic phase the Neel temperature TN is strongly reduced, and no hole spin freezing is observed at low temperatures. In the disordered magnetic phase (x>0.02) the transition temperature to the cluster spin-glass state Tg is enhanced. Possible reasons for the pronounced differences between the magnetic phase diagrams of thin-film and bulk samples are discussed.
  • The Pippard coherence length $\xi_0$ (the size of a Cooper pair) in an extreme type-I superconductor was determined directly through high-resolution measurement of the nonlocal electrodynamic effect combining low-energy muon spin rotation spectroscopy and polarized neutron reflectometry. The renormalization factor $Z$=m_cp*/2m (m_cp* and m are the mass of the Cooper pair and the electron, respectively) resulting from the electron-phonon interaction, and the temperature dependent London penetration depth $\lambda_L(T)$ were determined as well. A general expression linking $\xi_0$, $Z$ and $\lambda_L(0)$ is introduced and experimentally verified. This expression allows one to determine experimentally the Pippard coherence length in \textit{any} superconductor, independent of whether the electrodynamics is local or nonlocal, conventional or unconventional.
  • We studied phase separation in a single-crystalline antiferromagnetic superconductor Rb2Fe4Se5 (RFS) using a combination of scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) and low-energy muon spin rotation (LE-\mu SR). We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic and superconducting phases segregate into nanometer-thick layers perpendicular to the iron-selenide planes, while the characteristic in-plane size of the metallic domains reaches 10 \mu m. By means of LE-\mu SR we further show that in a 40-nm thick surface layer the ordered antiferromagnetic moment is drastically reduced, while the volume fraction of the paramagnetic phase is significantly enhanced over its bulk value. Self-organization into a quasiregular heterostructure indicates an intimate connection between the modulated superconducting and antiferromagnetic phases.
  • We present a detailed investigation of the magnetic and structural properties of magnetically doped 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3. From muon spin relaxation measurements in zero magnetic field, we find that even 5% Fe doping on the Bi site turns the full volume of the sample magnetic at temperatures as high as ~250 K. This is also confirmed by magnetization measurements. Two magnetic "phases" are identified; the first is observed between ~10-250 K while the second appears below ~10 K. These cannot be attributed to impurity phases in the samples. We discuss the nature and details of the observed magnetism and its dependence on doping level.
  • We present a low-energy muon-spin-rotation study of the magnetic and superconducting properties of YBa2Cu3O7/PrBa2Cu3O7 trilayer and bilayer heterostructures. By determining the magnetic-field profiles throughout these structures we show that a finite superfluid density can be induced in otherwise semiconducting PrBa2Cu3O7 layers when juxtaposed to YBa2Cu3O7 "electrodes" while the intrinsic antiferromagnetic order is unaffected.
  • We report on Muonium (Mu) emission into vacuum following {\mu}+ implantation in mesoporous thin SiO2 films. We obtain a yield of Mu into vacuum of (38\pm4)% at 250 K temperature and (20\pm4)% at 100 K for 5 keV {\mu}+ implantation energy. From the implantation energy dependence of the Mu vacuum yield we determine the Mu diffusion constants in these films: D250KMu = (1.6 \pm 0.1) \times 10-4 cm2/s and D100KMu = (4.2\pm0.5)\times10-5 cm2/s. Describing the diffusion process as quantum mechanical tunneling from pore-to-pore, we reproduce the measured temperature dependence T^3/2 of the diffusion constant. We extract a potential barrier of (-0.3 \pm 0.1) eV which is consistent with our computed Mu work-function in SiO2 of [-0.3,-0.9] eV. The high Mu vacuum yield even at low temperatures represents an important step towards next generation Mu spectroscopy experiments.