• We have observed a complex and continuous change in the integrated pulse profile of PSR B2217+47, manifested as additional components trailing the main peak. These transient components are detected over 6 years at $150$ MHz using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), but they are not seen in contemporaneous Lovell observations at $1.5$ GHz. We argue that propagation effects in the ionized interstellar medium (IISM) are the most likely cause. The putative structures in the IISM causing the profile variation are roughly half-way between the pulsar and the Earth and have transverse radii $R \sim 30$ AU. We consider different models for the structures. Under the assumption of spherical symmetry, their implied average electron density is $\overline{n}_e \sim 100$ cm$^{-3}$. Since PSR B2217+47 is more than an order of magnitude brighter than the average pulsar population visible to LOFAR, similar profile variations would not have been identified in most pulsars, suggesting that subtle profile variations in low-frequency profiles might be more common than we have observed to date. Systematic studies of these variations at low frequencies can provide a new tool to investigate the proprieties of the IISM and the limits to the precision of pulsar timing.
  • In outburst, neutron star X-ray binaries produce less powerful jets than black holes at a given X-ray luminosity. This has made them more difficult to study as they fade towards quiescence. To explore whether neutron stars power jets at low accretion rates ($L_{\rm X} \lesssim 10^{36}$ erg s$^{-1}$), we investigate the radio and X-ray properties of three accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (IGR J17511-3057, SAX J1808.4-3658 and IGR J00291+5934) during their outbursts in 2015, and of the non-pulsing neutron star Cen X-4 in quiescence (2015) and in outburst (1979). We did not detect the radio counterpart of IGR J17511-3057 in outburst or of Cen X-4 in quiescence, but did detect IGR J00291+5934 and SAX J1808.4-3658, showing that at least some neutron stars launch jets at low accretion rates. While the radio and X-ray emission in IGR J00291+5934 seem to be tightly correlated, the relationship in SAX J1808.4-3658 is more complicated. We find that SAX J1808.4-3658 produces jets during the reflaring tail, and we explore a toy model to ascertain whether the radio emission could be attributed to the onset of a strong propeller. The lack of a universal radio/X-ray correlation, with different behaviours in different neutron star systems (with various radio/X-ray correlations; some being radio faint and others not), points at distinct disk-jet interactions in individual sources, while always being fainter in the radio band than black holes at the same X-ray luminosity.
  • We analyse new observations with the International Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope, and archival data from the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN) and the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We model the spatially resolved radio spectrum of Arp 220 from 150 MHz to 33 GHz. We present an image of Arp 220 at 150 MHz with resolution $0.65''\times0.35''$, sensitivity 0.15 mJy beam$^{-1}$, and integrated flux density $394\pm59$ mJy. More than 80% of the detected flux comes from extended ($6''\approx$2.2 kpc) steep spectrum ($\alpha=-0.7$) emission, likely from star formation in the molecular disk surrounding the two nuclei. We find elongated features extending $0.3''$ (110 pc) and $0.9''$ (330 pc) from the eastern and western nucleus respectively, which we interpret as evidence for outflows. The extent of radio emission requires acceleration of cosmic rays far outside the nuclei. We find that a simple three component model can explain most of the observed radio spectrum of the galaxy. When accounting for absorption at 1.4 GHz, Arp 220 follows the FIR/radio correlation with $q=2.36$, and we estimate a star formation rate of 220 M$_\odot\text{yr}^{-1}$. We derive thermal fractions at 1 GHz of less than 1% for the nuclei, which indicates that a major part of the UV-photons are absorbed by dust. International LOFAR observations shows great promise to detect steep spectrum outflows and probe regions of thermal absorption. However, in LIRGs the emission detected at 150 MHz does not necessarily come from the main regions of star formation. This implies that high spatial resolution is crucial for accurate estimates of star formation rates for such galaxies at 150 MHz.
  • Model-independent distance constraints to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are of great value to both the timing observations of the radio pulsars, and multiwavelength observations of their companion stars. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) astrometry can be employed to provide these model-independent distances with very high precision via the detection of annual geometric parallax. Using the Very Long Baseline Array, we have observed two binary millisecond pulsars, PSR J1022+1001 and J2145-0750, over a two-year period and measured their distances to be 700 +14 -10 pc and 613 +16 -14 pc respectively. We use the well-calibrated distance in conjunction with revised analysis of optical photometry to tightly constrain the nature of their massive (M ~ 0.85 Msun) white dwarf companions. Finally, we show that several measurements of their parallax and proper motion of PSR J1022+1001 and PSR J2145-0750 obtained by pulsar timing array projects are incorrect, differing from the more precise VLBI values by up to 5 sigma. We investigate possible causes for the discrepancy, and find that imperfect modeling of the solar wind is a likely candidate for the timing model errors given the low ecliptic latitude of these two pulsars.
  • Theoretical models of grain growth predict dust properties to change as a function of protoplanetary disk radius, mass, age and other physical conditions. We lay down the methodology for a multi-wavelength analysis of (sub-)mm and cm continuum interferometric observations to constrain self-consistently the disk structure and the radial variation of the dust properties. The computational architecture is massively parallel and highly modular. The analysis is based on the simultaneous fit in the uv-plane of observations at several wavelengths with a model for the disk thermal emission and for the dust opacity. The observed flux density at the different wavelengths is fitted by posing constraints on the disk structure and on the radial variation of the grain size distribution. We apply the analysis to observations of three protoplanetary disks (AS 209, FT Tau, DR Tau) for which a combination of spatially resolved observations in the range ~0.88mm to ~10mm is available (from SMA, CARMA, and VLA), finding evidence of a decreasing maximum dust grain size (a_max) with radius. We derive large a_max values up to 1 cm in the inner disk between 15 and 30 AU and smaller grains with a_max~1 mm in the outer disk (R > 80AU). In this paper we develop a multi-wavelength analysis that will allow this missing quantity to be constrained for statistically relevant samples of disks and to investigate possible correlations with disk or stellar parameters.
  • The transitional millisecond pulsar binary system PSR J1023+0038 re-entered an accreting state in 2013 June, in which it bears many similarities to low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in quiescence or near-quiescence. At a distance of just 1.37 kpc, PSR J1023+0038 offers an unsurpassed ability to study low-level accretion onto a highly-magnetized compact object. We have monitored PSR J1023+0038 intensively using radio imaging with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the European VLBI Network and LOFAR, seeing rapidly variable, flat spectrum emission that persists over a period of 6 months. The flat spectrum and variability are indicative of synchrotron emission originating in an outflow from the system, most likely in the form of a compact, partially self-absorbed jet, as is seen in LMXBs at higher accretion rates. The radio brightness, however, greatly exceeds extrapolations made from observations of more vigorously accreting neutron star LMXB systems. We postulate that PSR J1023+0038 is undergoing radiatively inefficient 'propeller-mode' accretion, with the jet carrying away a dominant fraction of the liberated accretion luminosity. We confirm that the enhanced gamma-ray emission seen in PSR J1023+0038 since it re-entered an accreting state has been maintained; the increased gamma-ray emission in this state can also potentially be associated with propeller-mode accretion. Similar accretion modes can be invoked to explain the radio and X-ray properties of the other two known transitional millisecond pulsar systems XSS J12270-4859 and PSR J1824-2452I (M28I), suggesting that radiatively inefficient accretion may be an ubiquitous phenomenon amongst (at least one class of) neutron star binaries at low accretion rates.
  • The nuclear starburst in the nearby galaxy M82 provides an excellent laboratory for understanding the physics of star formation. This galaxy has been extensively observed in the past, revealing tens of radio-bright compact objects embedded in a diffuse free-free absorbing medium. Our understanding of the structure and physics of this medium in M82 can be greatly improved by high-resolution images at low frequencies where the effects of free-free absorption are most prominent. The aims of this study are, firstly, to demonstrate imaging using international baselines of the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), and secondly, to constrain low-frequency spectra of compact and diffuse emission in the central starburst region of M82 via high-resolution radio imaging at low frequencies. The international LOFAR telescope was used to observe M82 at 110-126MHz and 146-162MHz. Images were obtained using standard techniques from very long baseline interferometry. images were obtained at each frequency range: one only using international baselines, and one only using the longest Dutch (remote) baselines. The 154MHz image obtained using international baselines is a new imaging record in terms of combined image resolution (0.3$"$) and sensitivity ($\sigma$=0.15mJy/beam) at low frequencies ($<327$MHz). We detected 16 objects at 154MHz, six of these also at 118MHz. Four weaker but resolved features are also found: a linear (50pc) filament and three other resolved objects, of which two show a clear shell structure. We do not detect any emission from either supernova 2008iz or from the radio transient source 43.78+59.3. The images obtained using remote baselines show diffuse emission, associated with the outflow in M82, with reduced brightness in the region of the edge-on star-forming disk.
  • Aims. An efficient means of locating calibrator sources for International LOFAR is developed and used to determine the average density of usable calibrator sources on the sky for subarcsecond observations at 140 MHz. Methods. We used the multi-beaming capability of LOFAR to conduct a fast and computationally inexpensive survey with the full International LOFAR array. Sources were pre-selected on the basis of 325 MHz arcminute-scale flux density using existing catalogues. By observing 30 different sources in each of the 12 sets of pointings per hour, we were able to inspect 630 sources in two hours to determine if they possess a sufficiently bright compact component to be usable as LOFAR delay calibrators. Results. Over 40% of the observed sources are detected on multiple baselines between international stations and 86 are classified as satisfactory calibrators. We show that a flat low-frequency spectrum (from 74 to 325 MHz) is the best predictor of compactness at 140 MHz. We extrapolate from our sample to show that the density of calibrators on the sky that are sufficiently bright to calibrate dispersive and non-dispersive delays for the International LOFAR using existing methods is 1.0 per square degree. Conclusions. The observed density of satisfactory delay calibrator sources means that observations with International LOFAR should be possible at virtually any point in the sky, provided that a fast and efficient search using the methodology described here is conducted prior to the observation to identify the best calibrator.
  • For over a decade, the structure of the inner cavity in the transition disk of TW Hydrae has been a subject of debate. Modeling the disk with data obtained at different wavelengths has led to a variety of proposed disk structures. Rather than being inconsistent, the individual models might point to the different faces of physical processes going on in disks, such as dust growth and planet formation. Our aim is to investigate the structure of the transition disk again and to find to what extent we can reconcile apparent model differences. A large set of high-angular-resolution data was collected from near-infrared to centimeter wavelengths. We investigated the existing disk models and established a new self-consistent radiative-transfer model. A genetic fitting algorithm was used to automatize the parameter fitting. Simple disk models with a vertical inner rim and a radially homogeneous dust composition from small to large grains cannot reproduce the combined data set. Two modifications are applied to this simple disk model: (1) the inner rim is smoothed by exponentially decreasing the surface density in the inner ~3 AU, and (2) the largest grains (>100 um) are concentrated towards the inner disk region. Both properties can be linked to fundamental processes that determine the evolution of protoplanetary disks: the shaping by a possible companion and the different regimes of dust-grain growth, respectively. The full interferometric data set from near-infrared to centimeter wavelengths requires a revision of existing models for the TW Hya disk. We present a new model that incorporates the characteristic structures of previous models but deviates in two key aspects: it does not have a sharp edge at 4 AU, and the surface density of large grains differs from that of smaller grains. This is the first successful radiative-transfer-based model for a full set of interferometric data.
  • Gravitationally bound three-body systems have been studied for hundreds of years and are common in our Galaxy. They show complex orbital interactions, which can constrain the compositions, masses, and interior structures of the bodies and test theories of gravity, if sufficiently precise measurements are available. A triple system containing a radio pulsar could provide such measurements, but the only previously known such system, B1620-26 (with a millisecond pulsar, a white dwarf, and a planetary-mass object in an orbit of several decades), shows only weak interactions. Here we report precision timing and multi-wavelength observations of PSR J0337+1715, a millisecond pulsar in a hierarchical triple system with two other stars. Strong gravitational interactions are apparent and provide the masses of the pulsar (1.4378(13) Msun, where Msun is the solar mass and the parentheses contain the uncertainty in the final decimal places) and the two white dwarf companions (0.19751(15) Msun and 0.4101(3) Msun), as well as the inclinations of the orbits (both approximately 39.2 degrees). The unexpectedly coplanar and nearly circular orbits indicate a complex and exotic evolutionary past that differs from those of known stellar systems. The gravitational field of the outer white dwarf strongly accelerates the inner binary containing the neutron star, and the system will thus provide an ideal laboratory in which to test the strong equivalence principle of general relativity.
  • We present the description and early results of the mJy Imaging VLBA Exploration at 20 cm (mJIVE-20). mJIVE-20 is a large project on the Very Long Baseline Array which uses "filler" time to systematically inspect a large sample of mJy radio sources, pre-selected from the FIRST survey made with the Very Large Array, to identify any compact emission which may be present. The newly available multifield capability of the VLBA makes it possible for us to inspect of order 100 sources per hour of observing time with a 6.75 sigma detection sensitivity of approximately 1 mJy/beam. The results of the mJIVE-20 survey are made publicly available as soon as the data are calibrated. After 18 months of observing, over 20,000 FIRST sources have been inspected, with 4,336 VLBI detections. These initial results suggest that within the range 1 - 200 mJy, fainter sources are somewhat more likely to be dominated by a very compact component than brighter sources. Over half of all arcsecond-scale mJy radio sources contain a compact component, although the fraction of sources which are dominated by milliarcsecond scale structure is smaller at 30-35%, increasing towards lower flux densities. Significant differences are seen depending on the optical classification of the source. Radio sources with a stellar/point-like counterpart in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are more likely to be detected overall, but this detection likelihood appears to be independent of the arcsecond-scale radio flux density; the trend towards higher radio compactness for fainter sources is confined to SDSS galaxies and non-detections. These results are consistent with a unification model of AGN in which less luminous sources have on average slower radio jets, with lower Doppler suppression of compact core emission over a wider range of viewing angles. (abridged)
  • The centre of our Milky Way harbours the closest candidate for a supermassive black hole. The source is thought to be powered by radiatively inefficient accretion of gas from its environment. This form of accretion is a standard mode of energy supply for most galactic nuclei. X-ray measurements have already resolved a tenuous hot gas component from which it can be fed. However, the magnetization of the gas, a crucial parameter determining the structure of the accretion flow, remains unknown. Strong magnetic fields can influence the dynamics of the accretion, remove angular momentum from the infalling gas, expel matter through relativistic jets and lead to the observed synchrotron emission. Here we report multi-frequency measurements with several radio telescopes of a newly discovered pulsar close to the Galactic Centre and show that its unusually large Faraday rotation indicates a dynamically relevant magnetic field near the black hole. If this field is accreted down to the event horizon it provides enough magnetic flux to explain the observed emission from the black hole, from radio to X-rays.
  • The binary pulsar J2222-0137 is an enigmatic system containing a partially recycled millisecond pulsar and a companion of unknown nature. Whilst the low eccentricity of the system favors a white dwarf companion, an unusual double neutron star system is also a possibility, and optical observations will be able to distinguish between these possibilities. In order to allow the absolute luminosity (or upper limit) of the companion object to be properly calibrated, we undertook astrometric observations with the Very Long Baseline Array to constrain the system distance via a measurement of annual geometric parallax. With these observations, we measure the parallax of the J2222-0137 system to be 3.742 +0.013 -0.016 milliarcseconds, yielding a distance of 267.3 +1.2 -0.9 pc, and measure the transverse velocity to be 57.1 +0.3 -0.2 km/s. Fixing these parameters in the pulsar timing model made it possible to obtain a measurement of Shapiro delay and hence the system inclination, which shows that the system is nearly edge-on (sin i = 0.9985 +/- 0.0005). Furthermore, we were able to detect the orbital motion of J2222-0137 in our VLBI observations and measure the longitude of ascending node. The VLBI astrometry yields the most accurate distance obtained for a radio pulsar to date, and is furthermore the most accurate parallax for any radio source obtained at "low" radio frequencies (below ~5 GHz, where the ionosphere dominates the error budget). Using the astrometric results, we show the companion to J2222-0137 will be easily detectable in deep optical observations if it is a white dwarf. Finally, we discuss the implications of this measurement for future ultra-high-precision astrometry, in particular in support of pulsar timing arrays.
  • M. P. van Haarlem, M. W. Wise, A. W. Gunst, G. Heald, J. P. McKean, J. W. T. Hessels, A. G. de Bruyn, R. Nijboer, J. Swinbank, R. Fallows, M. Brentjens, A. Nelles, R. Beck, H. Falcke, R. Fender, J. Hörandel, L. V. E. Koopmans, G. Mann, G. Miley, H. Röttgering, B. W. Stappers, R. A. M. J. Wijers, S. Zaroubi, M. van den Akker, A. Alexov, J. Anderson, K. Anderson, A. van Ardenne, M. Arts, A. Asgekar, I. M. Avruch, F. Batejat, L. Bähren, M. E. Bell, M. R. Bell, I. van Bemmel, P. Bennema, M. J. Bentum, G. Bernardi, P. Best, L. Bîrzan, A. Bonafede, A.-J. Boonstra, R. Braun, J. Bregman, F. Breitling, R. H. van de Brink, J. Broderick, P. C. Broekema, W. N. Brouw, M. Brüggen, H. R. Butcher, W. van Cappellen, B. Ciardi, T. Coenen, J. Conway, A. Coolen, A. Corstanje, S. Damstra, O. Davies, A. T. Deller, R.-J. Dettmar, G. van Diepen, K. Dijkstra, P. Donker, A. Doorduin, J. Dromer, M. Drost, A. van Duin, J. Eislöffel, J. van Enst, C. Ferrari, W. Frieswijk, H. Gankema, M. A. Garrett, F. de Gasperin, M. Gerbers, E. de Geus, J.-M. Grießmeier, T. Grit, P. Gruppen, J. P. Hamaker, T. Hassall, M. Hoeft, H. Holties, A. Horneffer, A. van der Horst, A. van Houwelingen, A. Huijgen, M. Iacobelli, H. Intema, N. Jackson, V. Jelic, A. de Jong, E. Juette, D. Kant, A. Karastergiou, A. Koers, H. Kollen, V. I. Kondratiev, E. Kooistra, Y. Koopman, A. Koster, M. Kuniyoshi, M. Kramer, G. Kuper, P. Lambropoulos, C. Law, J. van Leeuwen, J. Lemaitre, M. Loose, P. Maat, G. Macario, S. Markoff, J. Masters, D. McKay-Bukowski, H. Meijering, H. Meulman, M. Mevius, E. Middelberg, R. Millenaar, J. C. A. Miller-Jones, R. N. Mohan, J. D. Mol, J. Morawietz, R. Morganti, D. D. Mulcahy, E. Mulder, H. Munk, L. Nieuwenhuis, R. van Nieuwpoort, J. E. Noordam, M. Norden, A. Noutsos, A. R. Offringa, H. Olofsson, A. Omar, E. Orrú, R. Overeem, H. Paas, M. Pandey-Pommier, V. N. Pandey, R. Pizzo, A. Polatidis, D. Rafferty, S. Rawlings, W. Reich, J.-P. de Reijer, J. Reitsma, A. Renting, P. Riemers, E. Rol, J. W. Romein, J. Roosjen, M. Ruiter, A. Scaife, K. van der Schaaf, B. Scheers, P. Schellart, A. Schoenmakers, G. Schoonderbeek, M. Serylak, A. Shulevski, J. Sluman, O. Smirnov, C. Sobey, H. Spreeuw, M. Steinmetz, C. G. M. Sterks, H.-J. Stiepel, K. Stuurwold, M. Tagger, Y. Tang, C. Tasse, I. Thomas, S. Thoudam, M. C. Toribio, B. van der Tol, O. Usov, M. van Veelen, A.-J. van der Veen, S. ter Veen, J. P. W. Verbiest, R. Vermeulen, N. Vermaas, C. Vocks, C. Vogt, M. de Vos, E. van der Wal, R. van Weeren, H. Weggemans, P. Weltevrede, S. White, S. J. Wijnholds, T. Wilhelmsson, O. Wucknitz, S. Yatawatta, P. Zarka, A. Zensus, J. van Zwieten
    May 19, 2013 astro-ph.IM
    LOFAR, the LOw-Frequency ARray, is a new-generation radio interferometer constructed in the north of the Netherlands and across europe. Utilizing a novel phased-array design, LOFAR covers the largely unexplored low-frequency range from 10-240 MHz and provides a number of unique observing capabilities. Spreading out from a core located near the village of Exloo in the northeast of the Netherlands, a total of 40 LOFAR stations are nearing completion. A further five stations have been deployed throughout Germany, and one station has been built in each of France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR achieves unparalleled sensitivity and angular resolution in the low-frequency radio regime. The LOFAR facilities are jointly operated by the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) foundation, as an observatory open to the global astronomical community. LOFAR is one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. LOFAR's new capabilities, techniques and modus operandi make it an important pathfinder for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We give an overview of the LOFAR instrument, its major hardware and software components, and the core science objectives that have driven its design. In addition, we present a selection of new results from the commissioning phase of this new radio observatory.
  • The recently discovered transitional millisecond pulsar system J1023+0038 exposes a crucial evolutionary phase of recycled neutron stars for multiwavelength study. The system, comprising the neutron star itself, its stellar companion, and the surrounding medium, is visible across the electromagnetic spectrum from the radio to X-ray/gamma-ray regimes and offers insight into the recycling phase of millisecond pulsar evolution. Here, we report on multiple-epoch astrometric observations with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) which give a system parallax of 0.731 +/- 0.022 milliarcseconds (mas) and a proper motion of 17.98 +/- 0.05 mas/yr. By combining our results with previous optical observations, we are able to use the parallax distance of 1368+42-39 pc to estimate the mass of the pulsar as 1.71 +/- 0.16 solar masses, and we are also able to measure the 3D space velocity of the system as 126 +/- 5 km/s. Despite the precise nature of the VLBA measurements, the remaining ~3% distance uncertainty dominates the 0.16 solar mass error on our mass estimate.
  • Radio observations using the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique typically have fields of view of only a few arcseconds, due to the computational problems inherent in imaging larger fields. Furthermore, sensitivity limitations restrict observations to very compact and bright objects, which are few and far between on the sky. Thus, while most branches of observational astronomy can carry out sensitive, wide-field surveys, VLBI observations are limited to targeted observations of carefully selected objects. However, recent advances in technology have made it possible to carry out the computations required to target hundreds of sources simultaneously. Furthermore, sensitivity upgrades have dramatically increased the number of objects accessible to VLBI observations. The combination of these two developments have enhanced the survey capabilities of VLBI observations such that it is now possible to observe (almost) any point in the sky with milli-arcsecond resolution. In this talk I review the development of wide-field VLBI, which has made significant progress over the last three years.
  • The formation mechanism of neutron stars with extremely large magnetic field strengths (magnetars) remains unclear. Some formation scenarios predict that magnetars should be born with extremely high space velocities, >1000 km/s. Using the Long Baseline Array in Australia, we have measured the proper motion of the intermittently radio-bright magnetar J1550-5418 (1E 1547.0-5408) to be 9.2 +/- 0.6 mas/yr. For a likely distance of 6 +/- 2 kpc, the implied transverse velocity is 280 + 130 - 120 km/s after correcting for Galactic rotation. Along with the ~200 km/s transverse velocity measured for the magnetar XTE J1810-197, this result suggests that formation pathways producing large magnetic fields do not require very large birth kicks.
  • Obtaining pulsar parallaxes via relative astrometry (also known as differential astrometry) yields distances and transverse velocities that can be used to probe properties of the pulsar population and the interstellar medium. Large programs are essential to obtain the sample sizes necessary for these population studies, but they must be efficiently conducted to avoid requiring an infeasible amount of observing time. This paper describes the PSRPI astrometric program, including the use of new features in the DiFX software correlator to efficiently locate calibrator sources, selection and observing strategies for a sample of 60 pulsars, initial results, and likely science outcomes. Potential applications of high-precision relative astrometry to measure source structure evolution in defining sources of the International Celestial Referent Frame are also discussed.
  • Accurate measurement of pulsar distances via astrometry using very long baseline interferometry enables the improvement of Galactic electron density distribution models, improving distance estimates for the vast majority of pulsars for which parallax measurements are unavailable. However, pulsars at southern declinations have been under-represented in previous interferometric astrometry campaigns. In order to redress this imbalance, we have conducted a two-year astrometric campaign targeting eight southern pulsars with the Australian Long Baseline Array. The program summarized in this paper has resulted in the measurement of seven new pulsar parallaxes, with success on objects down to a mean flux density of 0.8 mJy at 1600 MHz. Our results highlight the substantial uncertainties that remain when utilizing free electron density models for individual pulsar distances. Until this study, PSR J0630-2834 was believed to convert 16% of its spin-down energy into x-rays, but our measured parallax distance of 332 (+52 -40) pc has revised this value to <1%. In contrast, PSR J0108-1431 was found to be almost a factor of two more distant than previously thought, making its conversion of spin-down energy to x-rays the most efficient known (>1%). The 8.5 second radio pulsar J2144-3933 was found to be closer than previously predicted, making its apparent 1400 MHz radio luminosity the lowest of any known pulsar (20 microJy kpc^2). We have examined the growing population of neutron stars with accurate parallaxes to determine the effect of distance errors on the underlying neutron star velocity distribution, and find that typical distance errors may be biasing the estimated mean pulsar velocity upwards by 5%, and are likely to exaggerate the distribution's high-velocity tail.
  • (Abridged) This thesis describes the development of DiFX, the first general-purpose software correlator for radio interferometry, and its use with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) to complete the largest VLBI pulsar astrometry program undertaken to date in the Southern Hemisphere. This two year astrometry program has resulted in the measurement of seven new pulsar parallaxes, more than trebling the number of measured VLBI pulsar parallaxes in the Southern Hemisphere. The measurements included a determination of the distance and transverse velocity of PSR J0437-4715 with better than 1% accuracy, enabling improved tests of General Relativity, and the first significant measurement of parallax for the famous double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B, which will allow tests of General Relativity in this system to proceed to the 0.01% level. The DiFX software correlator developed to enable this science has been extensively tested and is now an integral part of the upgraded LBA Major National Research Facility; furthermore, it has been selected to facilitate a substantial sensitivity upgrade for the US Very Long Baseline Array.
  • The double pulsar J0737-3039A/B is a unique system with which to test gravitational theories in the strong-field regime. However, the accuracy of such tests will be limited by knowledge of the distance and relative motion of the system. Here we present very long baseline interferometry observations which reveal that the distance to PSR J0737-3039A/B is 1150+220-160 pc, more than double previous estimates, and confirm its low transverse velocity (~9 km/s). Combined with a decade of pulsar timing, these results will allow tests of gravitational radiation emission theories at the 0.01% level, putting stringent constraints on theories which predict dipolar gravitational radiation. They also allow insight into the system's formation and the source of its high-energy emission.
  • Using the recently upgraded Long Baseline Array, we have measured the trigonometric parallax of PSR J0437-4715 to better than 1% precision, the most precise pulsar distance determination made to date. Comparing this VLBI distance measurement to the kinematic distance obtained from pulsar timing, which is calculated from the pulsar's proper motion and apparent rate of change of orbital period, gives a precise limit on the unmodeled relative acceleration between the Solar System and PSR J0437-4715, which can be used in a variety of applications. Firstly, it shows that Newton's gravitational constant G is stable with time (\dot{G}/G = (-5 +- 26) x 10^{-13} yr^{-1}, 95% confidence). Secondly, if a stochastic gravitational wave background existed at the currently quoted limit, this null result would fail ~50% of the time. Thirdly, it excludes Jupiter-mass planets within 226 AU of the Sun in 50% of the sky (95% confidence). Finally, the ~1% agreement of the parallax and orbital period derivative distances provides a fundamental confirmation of the parallax distance method upon which all astronomical distances are based.
  • Infrared and submillimetre observations of nearby Vega-like stars have revealed a number of clumpy, asymmetric dust debris disks. Previous studies using semi-analytical and numerical methods have suggested planetary companions of various mass as the likely cause of most examples of disk asymmetry. In this paper, we modify an N-body symplectic gravitational integrator to include radiation terms and conduct medium-resolution parameter searches to identify likely planetary candidates in observed Vega-like systems. We also present high resolution models of Vega and epsilon Eridani, comparing our results to those of previous authors, and a new model for Fomalhaut.