• We present a detailed analysis of the morphological properties of the Crab Nebula across the electromagnetic spectrum based on new and previous high-quality data from radio to X-rays. In the radio range we obtained an image of the entire nebula at 3 GHz with subarcsecond angular resolution using the VLA (NRAO) and an image at 100 GHz of the central region using the ALMA array. Simultaneously with the VLA observations we performed HST WFPC3 near infrared and Chandra X-ray observations of the central region of the nebula. In addition we produced a new UV image of the Crab nebula at 291 nm by co-adding 75 individual exposures of the Optical-UV Monitor on board XMM-Newton. The high-angular resolution and high-dynamic range radio image at 3 GHz allowed us to improve the detection and characterization of peculiar morphological features including arches with foot brightening and intercrossed loop-like structures, likely originating in plasma confined to magnetic field lines. Based on the new radio image, we carried out a detailed multiwavelength correlation. In the central area, the comparison of the almost simultaneous images confirms that the wisps in the three spectral ranges do not generally coincide in location, the radio emission being the most discordant, which is suggestive of the existence of two different synchrotron components. The X-ray pulsar jet does not have a radio counterpart. Instead, another jet-like feature is seen in radio, though with different curvature and starting point.
  • The dynamic range of the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) is limited at the bright end by coincidence loss, the superposition of multiple photons in the individual frames recorded from its micro-channel-plate (MCP) intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. One way to overcome this limitation is to use photons that arrive during the frame transfer of the CCD, forming vertical read-out streaks for bright sources. We calibrate these read-out streaks for photometry of bright sources observed with XMM-OM. The bright source limit for read-out streak photometry is set by the recharge time of the MCPs. For XMM-OM we find that the MCP recharge time is 0.55 ms. We determine that the effective bright limits for read-out streak photometry with XMM-OM are approximately 1.5 magnitudes brighter than the bright source limits for normal aperture photometry in full-frame images. This translates into bright-source limits in Vega magnitudes of UVW2=7.1, UVM2=8.0, UVW1=9.4, U=10.5, B=11.5, V=10.2 and White=12.5 for data taken early in the mission. The limits brighten by up to 0.2 magnitudes, depending on filter, over the course of the mission as the detector ages. The method is demonstrated by deriving UVW1 photometry for the symbiotic nova RR Telescopii, and the new photometry is used to constrain the e-folding time of its decaying UV emission. Using the read-out streak method, we obtain photometry for 50 per cent of the missing UV source measurements in version 2.1 of the XMM-Newton Serendipitous UV Source Survey (XMM-SUSS 2.1) catalogue.
  • The object PG 0043+039 has been identified as a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar based on its UV spectra. However, this optical luminous quasar has not been detected before in deep X-ray observations, making it the most extreme X-ray weak quasar known today. This study aims to detect PG 0043+039 in a deep X-ray exposure. The question is what causes the extreme X-ray weakness of PG 0043+039? Does PG 0043+039 show other spectral or continuum peculiarities? We took simultaneous deep X-ray spectra with XMM-Newton, far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and optical spectra of PG 0043+039 with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) and Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) in July, 2013. We have detected PG 0043+039 in our X-ray exposure taken in 2013. We presented our first results in a separate paper (Kollatschny et al. 2015). PG 0043+039 shows an extreme {\alpha}_ox gradient ({\alpha}_ox =-2.37). Furthermore, we were able to verify an X-ray flux of this source in a reanalysis of the X-ray data taken in 2005. At that time, it was fainter by a factor of 3.8 +- 0.9 with {\alpha}_ox=-2.55. The X-ray spectrum is compatible with a normal quasar power-law spectrum ({\Gamma}=1.70_-0.45^+0.57) with moderate intrinsic absorption (N_H=5.5_-3.9^+6.9 +- 10^21cm^-2) and reflection. The UV/optical flux of PG 0043+039 has increased by a factor of 1.8 compared to spectra taken in the years 1990-1991. The FUV spectrum is highly peculiar and dominated by broad bumps besides Ly{\alpha}. There is no detectable Lyman edge associated with the BAL absorbing gas seen in the CIV line. PG 0043+039 shows a maximum in the overall continuum flux at around {\lambda} 2500{\AA} in contrast to most other AGN where the maximum is found at shorter wavelengths. All the above is compatible with an intrinsically X-ray weak quasar, rather than an absorbed X-ray emission.
  • The XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has repeatedly observed the CDFS in 33 epochs (2001-2010) through the XMM-CDFS Deep Survey. During the X-ray observations, XMM-OM targeted the central 17x17 arcmin2 region of the X-ray field of view, providing simultaneous optical/UV coverage of the CDFS. The resulting set of data can be used to build an XMM-OM catalogue of the CDFS, filling the UV spectral coverage between the optical surveys and GALEX observations. We present the UV catalogue of the XMM-CDFS Deep Survey. Its main purpose is to provide complementary UV average photometric measurements of known optical/UV sources in the CDFS, taking advantage of the unique characteristics of the survey. The data reduction is also intended to improve the standard source detection on individual observations, by cataloguing faint sources by stacking their exposure images. We reprocessed the XMM-OM data of the survey and stacked the exposures from consecutive observations using the standard SAS tools to process the data obtained during single observations. Average measurements of detections with SAS good quality flags from individual observations and from stacked images were joined to compile the catalogue. Sources were validated through the cross-identification within the EIS and COMBO-17 surveys. Photometric data of 1129 CDFS sources are provided in the catalogue, and optical/UV/X-ray photometric and spectroscopic information from other surveys are also included. The stacking extends the detection limits by ~1 mag in the three UV bands, contributing 30% of the catalogued UV sources. The comparison with the available measurements in similar spectral bands confirms the validity of the XMM-OM calibration. The combined COMBO-17/X-ray classification of the "intermediate" sources (e.g. optically diluted and/or X-ray absorbed AGN) is also discussed.
  • Although the star itself is not He enriched, the periodicity and the variability in the UV wind lines of the pulsating B1 IV star beta Cep are similar to what is observed in magnetic He-peculiar B stars, suggesting that beta Cep is magnetic. We searched for a magnetic field using spectropolarimetry. From UV spectroscopy, we analysed the wind variability and investigated the correlation with the magnetic data. Using 130 time-resolved circular polarisation spectra, obtained with the MuSiCoS spectropolarimeter at the 2m TBL from 1998 until 2005, we applied the least-squares deconvolution method on the Stokes V spectra and derived the longitudinal component of the integrated magnetic field over the visible hemisphere of the star. We performed a period analysis on the magnetic data and on EW measurements of UV wind lines obtained over 17 years. We also analysed the short- and long-term radial velocity variations, which are due to the pulsations and the 90-year binary motion. beta Cep hosts a sinusoidally varying magnetic field with an amplitude 97(4) G and an average value -6(3) G. From the UV wind line variability, we derive a period of 12.00075(11) days, which is the rotation period of the star, and is compatible with the observed magnetic modulation. Phases of maximum and minimum field match those of maximum emission in the UV wind lines, strongly supporting an oblique magnetic-rotator model. We discuss the magnetic behaviour as a function of pulsation behaviour and UV line variability. This paper presents the analysis of the first confirmed detection of a dipolar magnetic field in an upper main-sequence pulsating star. Maximum wind absorption originates in the magnetic equatorial plane. Maximum emission occurs when the magnetic north pole points to the Earth. Radial velocities agree with the ~90-y orbit around its Be-star binary companion.
  • The XMM-Newton Serendipitous Ultraviolet Source Survey (XMM-SUSS) is a catalogue of ultraviolet (UV) sources detected serendipitously by the Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) on-board the XMM-Newton observatory. The catalogue contains ultraviolet-detected sources collected from 2,417 XMM-OM observations in 1-6 broad band UV and optical filters, made between 24 February 2000 and 29 March 2007. The primary contents of the catalogue are source positions, magnitudes and fluxes in 1 to 6 passbands, and these are accompanied by profile diagnostics and variability statistics. The XMM-SUSS is populated by 753,578 UV source detections above a 3 sigma signal-to-noise threshold limit which relate to 624,049 unique objects. Taking account of substantial overlaps between observations, the net sky area covered is 29-54 square degrees, depending on UV filter. The magnitude distributions peak at 20.2, 20.9 and 21.2 in UVW2, UVM2 and UVW1 respectively. More than 10 per cent of sources have been visited more than once using the same filter during XMM-Newton operation, and > 20 per cent of sources are observed more than once per filter during an individual visit. Consequently, the scope for science based on temporal source variability on timescales of hours to years is broad. By comparison with other astrophysical catalogues we test the accuracy of the source measurements and define the nature of the serendipitous UV XMM-OM source sample. The distributions of source colours in the UV and optical filters are shown together with the expected loci of stars and galaxies, and indicate that sources which are detected in multiple UV bands are predominantly star-forming galaxies and stars of type G or earlier.
  • The 10th recorded outburst of the recurrent eclipsing nova USco was observed simultaneously in X-ray, UV, and optical by XMM-Newton on days 22.9 and 34.9 after outburst. Two full passages of the companion in front of the nova ejecta were observed, witnessing the reformation of the accretion disk. On day 22.9, we observed smooth eclipses in UV and optical but deep dips in the X-ray light curve which disappeared by day 34.9, then yielding clean eclipses in all bands. X-ray dips can be caused by clumpy absorbing material that intersects the line of sight while moving along highly elliptical trajectories. Cold material from the companion could explain the absence of dips in UV and optical light. The disappearance of X-ray dips before day 34.9 implies significant progress in the formation of the disk. The X-ray spectra contain photospheric continuum emission plus strong emission lines, but no clear absorption lines. Both continuum and emission lines in the X-ray spectra indicate a temperature increase from day 22.9 to day 34.9. We find clear evidence in the spectra and light curves for Thompson scattering of the photospheric emission from the white dwarf. Photospheric absorption lines can be smeared out during scattering in a plasma of fast electrons. We also find spectral signatures of resonant line scattering that lead to the observation of the strong emission lines. Their dominance could be a general phenomenon in high-inclination systems such as Cal87.
  • The Wolf-Rayet star WR 46 is known to exhibit a very complex variability pattern on relatively short time scales of a few hours. Periodic but intermittent radial velocity shifts of optical lines as well as multiple photometric periods have been found in the past. Non-radial pulsations, rapid rotational modulation or the presence of a putative low-mass companion have been proposed to explain the short-term behaviour. In an effort to unveil its true nature, we observed WR 46 with FUSE (Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer) over several short-term variability cycles. We found significant variations on a time scale of ~8 hours in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) continuum, in the blue edge of the absorption trough of the OVI {\lambda}{\lambda}1032, 1038 doublet P Cygni profile and in the SVI {\lambda}{\lambda}933, 944 P Cygni absorption profile. We complemented these observations with X-ray and UV light-curves and an X-ray spectrum from archival XMM-Newton (X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission - Newton Space Telescope) data. The X-ray and UV light-curves show variations on a time scale similar to the variability found in the FUV. We discuss our results in the context of the different scenarios suggested to explain the short-term variability of this object and reiterate that non-radial pulsations is the most likely to occur.
  • We have analysed data from five XMM-Newton observations of XB 1254-69, one of them simultaneous with INTEGRAL, to investigate the mechanism responsible for the highly variable dips durations and depths seen from this low-mass X-ray binary. Deep dips were present during two observations, shallow dips during one and no dips were detected during the remaining two observations. At high (1-4 s) time resolution ``shallow dips'' are seen to include a few, very rapid, deep dips whilst the ``deep'' dips consist of many similar very rapid, deep, fluctuations. The folded V-band Optical Monitor light curves obtained when the source was undergoing deep, shallow and no detectable dipping exhibit sinusoid-like variations with different amplitudes and phases. We fit EPIC spectra obtained from "persistent" or dip-free intervals with a model consisting of disc-blackbody and thermal comptonisation components together with Gaussian emission features at 1 and 6.6 keV modified by absorption due to cold and photo-ionised material. None of the spectral parameters appears to be strongly correlated with the dip depth except for the temperature of the disc blackbody which is coolest (kT ~ 1.8 keV) when deep dips are present and warmest (kT ~ 2.1 keV) when no dips are detectable. We propose that the changes in both disc temperature and optical modulation could be explained by the presence of a tilted accretion disc in the system. We provide a revised estimate of the orbital period of 0.16388875 +/- 0.00000017 day.
  • Further achievements of the XMM-Newton cross-calibration - XMM internal as well as with other X-ray missions - are presented. We explain the major changes in the new version SASv6.5 of the XMM-Newton science analysis system. The current status of the cross-calibration of the three EPIC cameras is shown. Using a large sample of blazars, the pn energy redistribution at low energy could be further calibrated, correcting the overestimation of fluxes in the lowest energy regime. In the central CCDs of the MOSs, patches were identified at the bore-sight positions, leading to an underestimation of the low energy fluxes. The further improvement in the understanding of the cameras resulted in a good agreement of the EPIC instruments down to lowest energies. The latest release of the SAS software package already includes corrections for both effects as shown in several examples of different types of sources. Finally the XMM internal cross-calibration is completed by the presentation of the current cross-calibration status between EPIC and RGS instruments. Major efforts have been made in cross-calibrations with other X-ray missions, most importantly with Chandra, of course, but also with currently observing satellites like Swift.
  • Spectra of B stars in the wavelength range of 911-1100 A have been obtained with the EURD spectrograph onboard the Spanish satellite MINISAT-01 with ~5 A spectral resolution. IUE spectra of the same stars have been used to normalize Kurucz models to the distance, reddening and spectral type of the corresponding star. The comparison of 8 main-sequence stars studied in detail (alpha Vir, epsilon Tau, lambda Tau, tau Tau, alpha Leo, zeta Lib, theta Oph, and sigma Sgr) shows agreement with Kurucz models, but observed fluxes are 10-40% higher than the models in most cases. The difference in flux between observations and models is higher in the wavelength range between Lyman alpha and Lyman beta. We suggest that Kurucz models underestimate the FUV flux of main-sequence B stars between these two Lyman lines. Computation of flux distributions of line-blanketed model atmospheres including non-LTE effects suggests that this flux underestimate could be due to departures from LTE, although other causes cannot be ruled out. We found the common assumption of solar metallicity for young disk stars should be made with care, since small deviations can have a significant impact on FUV model fluxes. Two peculiar stars (rho Leo and epsilon Aqr), and two emission line stars (epsilon Cap and pi Aqr) were also studied. Of these, only epsilon Aqr has a flux in agreement with the models. The rest have strong variability in the IUE range and/or uncertain reddening, which makes the comparison with models difficult.
  • In this paper we document the results of the study which led to the ripple correction and absolute calibration algorithms applied to the high resolution spectra processed with the NEWSIPS software for the Final Archive of the IUE Project. In this analysis, based on a very large number of spectra, we find that both K and the alpha parameters (not only the former as previously believed) vary with order number. This fact, together with the finding that the central peaks of the blaze function vary also as a function of the THDA temperature (for the SWP camera) and of the date of observations (for the LWP and LWR cameras), makes the ripple correction algorithm more complex than previously considered but, at the same time, considerably more reliable. As for the high resolution absolute calibration, the method followed is similar to the one implemented in IUESIPS. The internal accuracy of the high resolution calibration is about 4%. We note that the ripple correction and absolute calibration algorithms here described apply also to IUE data processed and distributed with the INES system.