• The behaviour of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (WDs) subject to direct helium accretion is extensively studied. We aim to analyze the thermal response of the accreting WD to mass deposition at different time scales. The analysis has been performed for initial WDs masses and accretion rates in the range (0.60 - 1.02) Msun and 1.e-9 - 1.e-5 Msun/yr, respectively. Thermal regimes in the parameters space M_{WD} - dot{M}_{He}, leading to formation of red-giant-like structure, steady burning of He, mild, strong and dynamical flashes have been identified and the transition between those regimes has been studied in detail. In particular, the physical properties of WDs experiencing the He-flash accretion regime have been investigated in order to determine the mass retention efficiency as a function of the accretor total mass and accretion rate. We also discuss to what extent the building-up of a He-rich layer via H-burning could be described according to the behaviour of models accreting He-rich matter directly. Polynomial fits to the obtained results are provided for use in binary population synthesis computations. Several applications for close binary systems with He-rich donors and CO WD accretors are considered and the relevance of the results for the interpretation of He-novae is discussed.
  • The evolutionary path of rotating CO WDs directly accreting CO-rich matter is followed up to few seconds before the explosive breakout in the framework of the Double Degenerate rotationally-driven accretion scenario. We find that the evolutionary properties depend only on the actual mass of the accreting WD and not on the previous history. We determine the expected frequency and amplitude of the gravitational wave emission, which occurs during the mass transfer process and acts as a self-tuning mechanism of the accretion process itself. The gravitational signal related to Galactic sources can be easily detected with the next generation of space-born interferometers and can provide notable constraints to the progenitor model. The expected statistical distribution of pre-explosive objects in the Galaxy is provided also in the effective temperature-apparent bolometric magnitude diagrams which can be used to identify merged DD systems via UV surveys. We emphasize that the thermonuclear explosion occurs owing to the decay of physical conditions keeping over-stable the structure above the classical Chandrasekhar limit and not by a steady increase of the WD mass up to this limit. This conclusion is independent of the evolutionary scenario for the progenitors, but it is a direct consequence of the stabilizing effect of rotation. Such an occurrence is epistemological change of the perspective in defining the ignition process in accreting WDs. Moreover, this requires a long evolutionary period (several million years) to attain the explosion after the above mentioned conditions cease to keep stable the WD. Therefore it is practically impossible to detect the trace of the exploding WD companion in recent pre-explosion frames of even very near SN Ia.
  • We calculate the dust formed around AGB and SAGB stars of metallicity Z=0.008 by following the evolution of models with masses in the range 1M<M<8M throughthe thermal pulses phase, and assuming that dust forms via condensation of molecules within a wind expanding isotropically from the stellar surface. We find that, because of the strong Hot Bottom Burning (HBB) experienced, high mass models produce silicates, whereas lower mass objects are predicted to be surrounded by carbonaceous grains; the transition between the two regimes occurs at a threshold mass of 3.5M. These fndings are consistent with the results presented in a previous investigation, for Z=0.001. However, in the present higher metallicity case, the production of silicates in the more massive stars continues for the whole AGB phase, because the HBB experienced is softer at Z=0.008 than at Z=0.001, thus the oxygen in the envelope, essential for the formation of water molecules, is never consumed completely. The total amount of dust formed for a given mass experiencing HBB increases with metallicity, because of the higher abundance of silicon, and the softer HBB, both factors favouring a higher rate of silicates production. This behaviour is not found in low mass stars,because the carbon enrichment of the stellar surface layers, due to repeated Third Drege Up episodes, is almost independent of the metallicity. Regarding cosmic dust enrichment by intermediate mass stars, we find that the cosmic yield at Z=0.008 is a factor 5 larger than at Z=0.001. In the lower metallicity case carbon dust dominates after about 300 Myr, but at Z=0.008 the dust mass is dominated by silicates at all times,with a prompt enrichment occurring after about 40 Myr, associated with the evolution of stars with masses M =7.5 -8M.
  • We compute the mass and composition of dust produced by stars with masses in the range 1Msun<M<8 Msun and with a metallicity of Z=0.001 during their AGB and Super AGB phases. Stellar evolution is followed from the pre-main sequence phase using the code ATON which provides, at each timestep, the thermodynamics and the chemical stucture of the wind. We use a simple model to describe the growth of the dust grains under the hypothesis of a time-independent, spherically symmetric stellar wind. We find that the total mass of dust injected by AGB stars in the interstellar medium does not increase monotonically with stellar mass and ranges between a minimum of 10^{-6}Msun for the 1.5Msun stellar model, up to 2x10^{-4} Msun, for the 6Msun case. Dust composition depends on the stellar mass: low-mass stars (M < 3Msun) produce carbon-rich dust, whereas more massive stars, experiencing Hot Bottom Burning, never reach the carbon-star stage, and produce silicates and iron. This is in partial disagreement with previous investigations in the literature, which are based on synthetic AGB models and predict that, when the initial metallicity is Z=0.001, C-rich dust is formed at all stellar masses. The differences are due to the different modelling of turbulent convection in the super-adiabaticity regime. Also in this case the treatment of super-adiabatic convection shows up as the most relevant issue affecting the dust-formation process. We also investigate Super AGB stars with masses 6.5Msun<M<8 Msun that evolve over a ONe core.Due to a favourable combination of mass loss and Hot Bottom Burning, these stars are predicted to be the most efficient silicate-dust producers, releasing [2 - 7]x 10^{-4} Msun masses of dust. We discuss the robustness of these predictions and their relevance for the nature and evolution of dust at early cosmic times.
  • We present a theoretical model for Type Ib supernova (SN) 2006jc. We calculate the evolution of the progenitor star, hydrodynamics and nucleosynthesis of the SN explosion, and the SN bolometric light curve (LC). The synthetic bolometric LC is compared with the observed bolometric LC constructed by integrating the UV, optical, near-infrared (NIR), and mid-infrared (MIR) fluxes. The progenitor is assumed to be as massive as $40M_\odot$ on the zero-age main-sequence. The star undergoes extensive mass loss to reduce its mass down to as small as $6.9M_\odot$, thus becoming a WCO Wolf-Rayet star. The WCO star model has a thick carbon-rich layer, in which amorphous carbon grains can be formed. This could explain the NIR brightening and the dust feature seen in the MIR spectrum. We suggest that the progenitor of SN 2006jc is a WCO Wolf-Rayet star having undergone strong mass loss and such massive stars are the important sites of dust formation. We derive the parameters of the explosion model in order to reproduce the bolometric LC of SN 2006jc by the radioactive decays: the ejecta mass $4.9M_\odot$, hypernova-like explosion energy $10^{52}$ ergs, and ejected $^{56}$Ni mass $0.22M_\odot$. We also calculate the circumstellar interaction and find that a CSM with a flat density structure is required to reproduce the X-ray LC of SN 2006jc. This suggests a drastic change of the mass-loss rate and/or the wind velocity that is consistent with the past luminous blue variable (LBV)-like event.