• Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as ATI and HHG. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated by them with high temporal and spatial resolution.
  • We present studies of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) at laser intensities well above saturation. We use driving laser pulses which present a particular electron dynamics in the turn-on stage. Our results predict an increasing on the harmonic yield, after an initial dropping, when the laser intensity is increased. This fact contradicts the general belief of a progressive degradation of the harmonic emission at ultrahigh intensities. We have identified a particular set of trajectories which emerges in the turn-on stage of these singular laser pulses, responsible of the unexpected growth on the harmonic efficiency at this high intensity regime. Our study combines two complementary approaches: classical analysis and full quantum mechanical calculations resulting from the numerical integration of the 3-dimensional time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation complemented with the time-frequency analysis.
  • Quasi-free field-driven electron trajectories are a key element of strong-field dynamics. Upon recollision with the parent ion, the energy transferred from the field to the electron may be released as attosecond duration XUV emission in the process of high harmonic generation (HHG). The conventional sinusoidal driver fields set limitations on the maximum value of this energy transfer, and it has been predicted that this limit can be significantly exceeded by an appropriately ramped-up cycleshape. Here, we present an experimental realization of such cycle-shaped waveforms and demonstrate control of the HHG process on the single-atom quantum level via attosecond steering of the electron trajectories. With our optimized optical cycles, we boost the field-ionization launching the electron trajectories, increase the subsequent field-to-electron energy transfer, and reduce the trajectory duration. We demonstrate, in realistic experimental conditions, two orders of magnitude enhancement of the generated XUV flux together with an increased spectral cutoff. This application, which is only one example of what can be achieved with cycle-shaped high-field light-waves, has farreaching implications for attosecond spectroscopy and molecular self-probing.
  • We present theoretical investigations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) resulting from the interaction of noble gases with localized surface plasmons. These plasmonic fields are produced when a metal nanoparticle is subject to a few-cycle laser pulse. The enhanced field, which largely depends on the geometrical shape of the metallic structure, has a strong spatial dependency. We demonstrate that the strong non-homogeneity of this laser field plays an important role in the HHG process and leads to a significant increase of the harmonic cut-off energy. In order to understand and characterize this new feature, we include the functional form of the laser electric field obtained from recent attosecond streaking experiments [F. S{\"u}{\ss}mann and M. F. Kling, Proc. of SPIE, {\bf Vol. 8096}, 80961C (2011)] in the time dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE). By performing classical simulations of the HHG process we show consistency between them and the quantum mechanical predictions. These allow us to understand the origin of the extended harmonic spectra as a selection of particular trajectory sets. The use of metal nanoparticles shall pave a completely new way of generating coherent XUV light with a laser field which characteristics can be synthesized locally.
  • We present numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation in helium using a temporally synthesised and spatially non-homogeneous strong laser field. The combination of temporal and spatial laser field synthesis results in a dramatic cut-off extension far beyond the usual semiclassical limit. Our predictions are based on the convergence of three complementary approaches: resolution of the three dimensional Time Dependent Schr\"odinger Equation, time-frequency analysis of the resulting dipole moment and classical trajectories extraction. Employing a combination of temporally and spatially synthesised laser field provides coherent XUV photons beyond the carbon K-edge which is of high interest for initiating inner-shell dynamics and study time-resolved intra-molecular attosecond spectroscopy.