• We observed a stellar occultation by Titan on 2003 November 14 from La Palma Observatory using ULTRACAM with three Sloan filters: u', g', and i' (358, 487, and 758 nm, respectively). The occultation probed latitudes 2 degrees S and 1 degrees N during immersion and emersion, respectively. A prominent central flash was present in only the i' filter, indicating wavelength-dependent atmospheric extinction. We inverted the light curves to obtain six lower-limit temperature profiles between 335 and 485 km (0.04 and 0.003 mb) altitude. The i' profiles agreed with the temperature measured by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument [Fulchignoni, M. et al., 2005. Nature 438, 785-791] above 415 km (0.01 mb). The profiles obtained from different wavelength filters systematically diverge as altitude decreases, which implies significant extinction in the light curves. Applying an extinction model [Elliot, J.L., Young, L.A., 1992. Astron. J. 103, 991-1015] gave the altitudes of line of sight optical depth equal to unity: 396 +/- 7 km and 401 +/- 20 km (u' immersion and emersion); 354 +/- 7 km and 387 +/- 7 km (g' immersion and emersion); and 336 +/- 5 km and 318 +/- 4 km (i' immersion and emersion). Further analysis showed that the optical depth follows a power law in wavelength with index 1.3 +/- 0.2. We present a new method for determining temperature from scintillation spikes in the occulting body's atmosphere. Temperatures derived with this method are equal to or warmer than those measured by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument. Using the highly structured, three-peaked central flash, we confirmed the shape of Titan's middle atmosphere using a model originally derived for a previous Titan occultation [Hubbard, W.B. et al., 1993. Astron. Astrophys. 269, 541-563].
  • We present millimeter interferometry images of the CO J=1-0 line emission arising in the circumstellar envelope of HD 56126 (a.k.a. IRAS 07134+1005), which is one of the best studied 21-micron proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs). The CO emission extends from 1.2" to 7" in radius from the central star and appears consistent with a simple expanding envelope, as expected for a post-AGB star. We quantitatively model the molecular envelope using a radiative transfer code that we have modified for detached shells. Our best fit model reveals that two sequential winds created the circumstellar envelope of HD 56126: an AGB wind that lasted 6500 years with a mass-loss rate of 5.1x10^{-6} M_odot yr^{-1} and a more intense superwind that lasted 840 years with a mass-loss rate of 3x10^{-5} M_odot yr^{-1} and that ended the star's life on the AGB 1240 years ago. The total mass of this envelope is 0.059 M_odot which indicates a lower limit progenitor mass for the system of 0.66 M_odot, quite reasonable for this low-metallicity star which probably resides in the thick disk of the Galaxy. Comparison with images of the dust emission reveal a similar structure with the gas in the inner regions. Using 2-DUST, we model the dust emission of this source so that the model is consistent with the CO emission model and find an average gas-to-dust mass ratio of 75.