• We present a tunnel spectroscopy study of single PbS Quantum Dots (QDs) as function of temperature and gate voltage. Three distinct signatures of strong electron-phonon coupling are observed in the Electron Tunneling Spectrum (ETS) of these QDs. In the shell-filling regime, the $8\times$ degeneracy of the electronic levels is lifted by the Coulomb interactions and allows the observation of phonon sub-bands that result from the emission of optical phonons. At low bias, a gap is observed in the ETS that cannot be closed with the gate voltage, which is a distinguishing feature of the Franck-Condon (FC) blockade. From the data, a Huang-Rhys factor in the range $S\sim 1.7 - 2.5$ is obtained. Finally, in the shell tunneling regime, the optical phonons appear in the inelastic ETS $d^2I/dV^2$.
  • We present a tunnel spectroscopy study of the electronic spectrum of single magnetite \chemform{Fe_3O_4} nanoparticles trapped between nanometer-spaced electrodes. The Verwey transition is clearly identified in the current voltage-characteristics where we find that the transition temperature is electric field dependent. The data show the presence of localized states at high energy, $\varepsilon \sim 0.6eV$, which can be attributed to polaron states. At low energy, the density of states (DOS) is suppressed at the approach of the Verwey transition. Below the Verwey transition, a gap, $\Delta \sim 300meV$, is observed in the spectrum. In contrast, no gap is observed in the high temperature phase, implying that electronic transport in this phase is possibly due to polaron hopping with activated mobility.
  • We report on local probe measurements of current-voltage and electrostatic force-voltage characteristics of electric-field-induced insulator to metal transition in VO2 thin film. In conducting AFM mode, switching from the insulating to metallic state occurs for electric-field threshold E~6.5\times10^7 Vm-1 at 300K. Upon lifting the tip above the sample surface, we find that the transition can also be observed through a change in electrostatic force and in tunneling current. In this noncontact regime, the transition is characterized by random telegraphic noise. These results show that electric field alone is sufficient to induce the transition; however, the electronic current provides a positive feedback effect that amplifies the phenomena.
  • We describe current-voltage characteristics I(V) of alkyl-ligated gold nanocrystals $\sim 5 nm$ arrays in long screening length limit. Arrays with different alkyl ligand lengths have been prepared to tune the electronic tunnel coupling between the nanocrystals. For long ligands, electronic diffusion occurs through sequential tunneling and follows activated laws, as function of temperature $\sigma \propto e^{-T_0/T}$ and as function of electric field $I \propto e^{-\mathcal{E}_0/\mathcal{E}}$. For better conducting arrays, i.e. with small ligands, the transport properties crossover to the cotunneling regime and follows Efros-Shklovskii laws as function of temperature $\sigma \propto e^{-(T_{ES}/T)^{1/2}}$ and as function of electric field $I \propto e^{-(\mathcal{E}_{ES}/\mathcal{E})^{1/2}}$. The data shows that electronic transport in nanocrystal arrays can be tuned from the sequential tunneling to the cotunneling regime by increasing the tunnel barrier transparency.
  • We have investigated the influence of point defect disorder in the electronic properties of manganite films. Real-time mapping of ion irradiated samples conductivity was performed though conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). CAFM images show electronic inhomogeneities in the samples with different physical properties due to spatial fluctuations in the point defect distribution. As disorder increases, the distance between conducting regions increases and the metal-insulator transition shifts to lower temperatures. Transport properties in these systems can be interpreted in terms of a percolative model. The samples saturation magnetization decreases as the irradiation dose increases whereas the Curie temperature remains unchanged.
  • We have used oxygen ions irradiation to generate controlled structural disorder in thin manganite films. Conductive atomic force microscopy CAFM), transport and magnetic measurements were performed to analyze the influence of the implantation process in the physical properties of the films. CAFM images show regions with different conductivity values, probably due to the random distribution of point defect or inhomogeneous changes of the local Mn3+/4+ ratio to reduce lattice strains of the irradiated areas. The transport and magnetic properties of these systems are interpreted in this context. Metal-insulator transition can be described in the frame of a percolative model. Disorder increases the distance between conducting regions, lowering the observed TMI. Point defect disorder increases localization of the carriers due to increased disorder and locally enhanced strain field. Remarkably, even with the inhomogeneous nature of the samples, no sign of low field magnetoresistance was found. Point defect disorder decreases the system magnetization but doesn t seem to change the magnetic transition temperature. As a consequence, an important decoupling between the magnetic and the metal-insulator transition is found for ion irradiated films as opposed to the classical double exchange model scenario.
  • Angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the electron-doped cuprate Sm(1.85)Ce(0.15)CuO(4) evidence anisotropic dressing of charge-carriers due to many-body interactions. Most significantly, the scattering rate along the zone boundary saturates for binding energies larger than ~200 meV, while along the diagonal direction it increases nearly linearly with the binding energy in the energy range ~150-500 meV. These results indicate that many-body interactions along the diagonal direction are strong down to the bottom of the band, while along the zone-bounday they become very weak at energies above ~200 meV.
  • We present local tunneling spectroscopy in the optimally electron-doped cuprate Sm2-xCexCuO4 x=0.15. A clear signature of the superconducting gap is observed with an amplitude ranging from place to place and from sample to sample (Delta~3.5-6meV). Another spectroscopic feature is simultaneously observed at high energy above \pm 50meV. Its energy scale and temperature evolution is found to be compatible with previous photoemission and optical experiments. If interpreted as the signature of antiferromagnetic order in the samples, these results could suggest the coexistence on the local scale of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity on the electron-doped side of cuprate superconductors.
  • The electron-doped cuprate Pr(2-x)Ce(x)CuO(4) is investigated using infrared magneto-optical measurements. The optical Hall conductivity sigma_{xy} shows a strong doping, frequency and temperature dependence consistent with the presence of a temperature and doping-dependent coherent backscattering amplitude which doubles the electronic unit cell. The data suggest that the coherent backscattering vanishes at a quantum critical point inside the superconducting dome and is associated with the commensurate antiferromagnetic order observed by other workers. Using a spectral weight analysis we have further investigated the Fermi-liquid like behavior of the overdoped sample. The observed Hall-conductance spectral weight is about 10 times less than that predicted by band theory, raising the fundamental question concerning the effect of Mott and antiferromagnetic correlations on the Hall conductance of strongly correlated materials.
  • The optical properties of single crystal Pr_{1.85}Ce_{0.15}CuO_4 have been measured over a wide frequency range above and below the critical temperature (T_c \simeq 20 K). In the normal state the coherent part of the conductivity is described by the Drude model, from which the scattering rate just above T_c is determined to be 1/\tau \simeq 80 cm^{-1}. The condition that \hbar/\tau \approx 2k_B T near T_c appears to be a general result in many of the cuprate superconductors. Below T_c the formation of a superconducting energy gap is clearly visible in the reflectance, from which the gap maximum is estimated to be \Delta_0 \simeq 35 cm^{-1} (4.3 meV). The ability to observe the superconducting energy gap in the optical properties favors the nonmonotonic over the monotonic description of the d-wave gap. The penetration depth for T\ll T_c is \lambda \simeq 2000 \AA, which when taken with the estimated value for the dc conductivity just above T_c of \sigma_{dc} \simeq 35 \times 10^3 \Omega^{-1}cm^{-1} places this material on the general scaling line for the cuprates defined by 1/\lambda^2 \propto \sigma_{dc}(T\simeq T_c) \times T_c. This result is consistent with the observation that 1/\tau \approx 2\Delta_0, which implies that the material is not in the clean limit.
  • We report infrared Hall conductivity $\sigma_{xy}(\omega)$ of Na$_{0.7}$CoO$_2$ thin films determined from Faraday rotation angle $\theta_{F}$ measurements. $\sigma_{xy}(\omega)$ exhibits two types of hole conduction, Drude and incoherent carriers. The coherent Drude carrier shows a large renormalized mass and Fermi liquid-like behavior of Hall scattering rate, $\gamma_{H} \sim aT^{2}$. The spectral weight is suppressed and disappears at T = 120K. The incoherent carrier response is centered at mid-IR frequency and shifts to lower energy with increasing T. Infrared Hall constant is positive and almost independent of temperature in sharp contrast with the dc-Hall constant.
  • The optical conductivity of CuO2 (copper-oxygen) planes in p- and n-type cuprates thin films at various doping levels is deduced from highly accurate reflectivity data. The temperature dependence of the real part sigma1(omega) of this optical conductivity and the corresponding spectral weight allow to track the opening of a partial gap in the normal state of n-type Pr{2-x}Ce(x)CuO4 (PCCO), but not of p-type Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+delta} (BSCCO) cuprates. This is a clear difference between these two families of cuprates, which we briefly discuss. In BSCCO, the change of the electronic kinetic energy Ekin - deduced from the spectral weight- at the superconducting transition is found to cross over from a conventional BCS behavior (increase of Ekin below Tc to an unconventional behavior (decrease of Ekin below Tc) as the free carrier density decreases. This behavior appears to be linked to the energy scale over which spectral weight is lost and goes into the superfluid condensate, hence may be related to Mott physics.
  • The doping and temperature dependent conductivity of electron-doped cuprates is analysed. The variation of kinetic energy with doping is shown to imply that the materials are approximately as strongly correlated as the hole-doped materials. The optical spectrum is fit to a quasiparticle scattering model; while the model fits the optical data well, gross inconsistencies with photoemission data are found, implying the presence of a large, strongly doping dependent Landau parameter.
  • We report the temperature dependence of the infrared-visible conductivity of Pr(2-x)Ce(x)CuO(4) thin films. When varying the doping from a non-superconducting film (x = 0.11) to a superconducting overdoped film (x = 0.17), we observe, up to optimal doping (x = 0.15), a partial gap opening. A model combining a spin density wave gap and a frequency and temperature dependent self energy reproduces our data reasonably well. The magnitude of this gap extrapolates to zero for x ~ 0.17 indicating the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in this material and the existence of a quantum critical point at this Ce concentration.
  • We measured the far infrared reflectivity of two superconducting Pr(2-x)Ce(x)CuO(4) films above and below Tc. The reflectivity in the superconducting state increases and the optical conductivity drops at low energies, in agreement with the opening of a (possibly) anisotropic superconducting gap. The maximum energy of the gap scales roughly with Tc as 2 Delta_{max} / kB Tc ~ 4.7. We determined absolute values of the penetration depth at 5 K as lambda_{ab} = (3300 +/- 700) A for x = 0.15 and lambda_{ab} = (2000 +/- 300) A for x = 0.17. A spectral weight analysis shows that the Ferrell-Glover-Tinkham sum rule is satisfied at conventional low energy scales \~ 4 Delta_{max}.
  • We studied the optical conductivity of electron doped Pr{1-x)Ce(x)CuO(4) from the underdoped to the overdoped regime. The observation of low to high frequency spectral weight transfer reveals the presence of a gap, except in the overdoped regime. A Drude peak at all temperatures shows the partial nature of this gap. The close proximity of the doping at which the gap vanishes to the antiferromagnetic phase boundary leads us to assign this partial gap to a spin density wave.