• We review current methods for building PSF-matching kernels for the purposes of image subtraction or coaddition. Such methods use a linear decomposition of the kernel on a series of basis functions. The correct choice of these basis functions is fundamental to the efficiency and effectiveness of the matching - the chosen bases should represent the underlying signal using a reasonably small number of shapes, and/or have a minimum number of user-adjustable tuning parameters. We examine methods whose bases comprise multiple Gauss-Hermite polynomials, as well as a form free basis composed of delta-functions. Kernels derived from delta-functions are unsurprisingly shown to be more expressive; they are able to take more general shapes and perform better in situations where sum-of-Gaussian methods are known to fail. However, due to its many degrees of freedom (the maximum number allowed by the kernel size) this basis tends to overfit the problem, and yields noisy kernels having large variance. We introduce a new technique to regularize these delta-function kernel solutions, which bridges the gap between the generality of delta-function kernels, and the compactness of sum-of-Gaussian kernels. Through this regularization we are able to create general kernel solutions that represent the intrinsic shape of the PSF-matching kernel with only one degree of freedom, the strength of the regularization lambda. The role of lambda is effectively to exchange variance in the resulting difference image with variance in the kernel itself. We examine considerations in choosing the value of lambda, including statistical risk estimators and the ability of the solution to predict solutions for adjacent areas. Both of these suggest moderate strengths of lambda between 0.1 and 1.0, although this optimization is likely dataset dependent.
  • Y. Muraki, C. Han, D.P. Bennett, D. Suzuki, L.A.G. Monard, R. Street, U.G. Jorgensen, P. Kundurthy, J. Skowron, A.C. Becker, M.D. Albrow, P. Fouque, D. Heyrovsky, R.K. Barry, J.-P. Beaulieu, D.D. Wellnitz, I.A. Bond, T. Sumi, S. Dong, B.S. Gaudi, D.M. Bramich, M. Dominik, F. Abe, C.S. Botzler, M. Freeman, A. Fukui, K. Furusawa, F. Hayashi, J.B. Hearnshaw, S. Hosaka, Y. Itow, K. Kamiya, A.V. Korpela, P.M. Kilmartin, W. Lin, C.H. Ling, S. Makita, K. Masuda, Y. Matsubara, N. Miyake, K. Nishimoto, K. Ohnishi, Y.C. Perrott, N.J. Rattenbury, To. Saito, L. Skuljan, D.J. Sullivan, W.L. Sweatman, P.J. Tristram, K. Wada, P.C.M. Yock, G.W. Christie, D.L. DePoy, E. Gorbikov, A. Gould, S. Kaspi, C.-U. Lee, F. Mallia, D. Maoz, J. McCormick, D. Moorhouse, T. Natusch, B.-G. Park, R.W. Pogge, D. Polishook, A. Shporer, G. Thornley, J.C. Yee, A. Allan, P. Browne, K. Horne, N. Kains, C. Snodgrass, I. Steele, Y. Tsapras, V. Batista, C.S. Bennett, S. Brillant, J.A.R. Caldwell, A. Cassan, A. Cole, R. Corrales, Ch. Coutures, S. Dieters, D. Dominis Prester, J. Donatowicz, J. Greenhill, D. Kubas, J.-B. Marquette, R. Martin, J Menzies, K.C. Sahu, I. Waldman, A. Williams M. Zub, H. Bourhrous, Y. Matsuoka, T. Nagayama, N. Oi, Z. Randriamanakoto, V. Bozza, M.J. Burgdorf, S. Calchi Novati, S. Dreizler, F. Finet, M. Glitrup, K. Harpsoe, T.C. Hinse, M. Hundertmark, C. Liebig, G. Maier, L. Mancini, M. Mathiasen, S. Rahvar, D. Ricci, G. Scarpetta, J. Skottfelt, J. Surdej, J. Southworth, J. Wambsganss, F. Zimmer, A. Udalski, R. Poleski, L. Wyrzykowski, K. Ulaczyk, M.K. Szymanski, M. Kubiak, G. Pietrzynski, I. Soszynski
    June 10, 2011 astro-ph.EP
    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m_p = 10.4 +- 1.7 Earth masses and orbits a star of mass M_* = 0.56 +- 0.09 Solar masses at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 (+1.9 -0.5) AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6 (+7.7 -1.5} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But, the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a "failed" gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets.
  • We present a catalog of periodic stellar variability in the "Stripe 82" region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). After aggregating and recalibrating catalog-level data from the survey, we ran a period-finding algorithm (Supersmoother) on all point-source lightcurves. We used color selection to identify systems that are likely to contain low-mass stars, in particular M dwarfs and white dwarfs. In total, we found 207 candidates, the vast majority of which appear to be in eclipsing binary systems. The catalog described in this paper includes 42 candidate M dwarf / white dwarf pairs, 4 white-dwarf pairs, 59 systems whose colors indicate they are composed of 2 M dwarfs and whose lightcurve shapes suggest they are in detached eclipsing binaries, and 28 M dwarf systems whose lightcurve shapes suggest they are in contact binaries. We find no detached systems with periods longer than 3 days, thus the majority of our sources are likely to have experienced orbital spin-up and enhanced magnetic activity. Indeed, twenty-six of twenty-seven M dwarf systems that we have spectra for show signs of chromospheric magnetic activity, far higher than the 24% seen in field stars of the same spectral type. We also find binaries composed of stars that bracket the expected boundary between partially and fully convective interiors, which will allow the measurement of the stellar mass-radius relationship across this transition. The majority of our contact systems have short orbital periods, with small variance (0.02 days) in the sample near the observed cutoff of 0.22 days. The accumulation of these stars at short orbital period suggests that the process of angular momentum loss, leading to period evolution, becomes less efficient at short periods. (Abridged)
  • Wide-angle surveys have been an engine for new discoveries throughout the modern history of astronomy, and have been among the most highly cited and scientifically productive observing facilities in recent years. This trend is likely to continue over the next decade, as many of the most important questions in astrophysics are best tackled with massive surveys, often in synergy with each other and in tandem with the more traditional observatories. We argue that these surveys are most productive and have the greatest impact when the data from the surveys are made public in a timely manner. The rise of the "survey astronomer" is a substantial change in the demographics of our field; one of the most important challenges of the next decade is to find ways to recognize the intellectual contributions of those who work on the infrastructure of surveys (hardware, software, survey planning and operations, and databases/data distribution), and to make career paths to allow them to thrive.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 photometry of 13 microlensed source stars from the 5.7 year Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) survey conducted by the MACHO Project. The microlensing source stars are identified by deriving accurate centroids in the ground-based MACHO images using difference image analysis (DIA) and then transforming the DIA coordinates to the HST frame. None of these sources is coincident with a background galaxy, which rules out the possibility that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample is contaminated with misidentified supernovae or AGN in galaxies behind the LMC. This supports the conclusion that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample has only a small amount of contamination due to non-microlensing forms of variability. We compare the WFPC2 source star magnitudes with the lensed flux predictions derived from microlensing fits to the light curve data. In most cases the source star brightness is accurately predicted. Finally, we develop a statistic which constrains the location of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing source stars with respect to the distributions of stars and dust in the LMC and compare this to the predictions of various models of LMC microlensing. This test excludes at > 90% confidence level models where more than 80% of the source stars lie behind the LMC. Exotic models that attempt to explain the excess LMC microlensing optical depth seen by MACHO with a population of background sources are disfavored or excluded by this test. Models in which most of the lenses reside in a halo or spheroid distribution associated with either the Milky Way or the LMC are consistent which these data, but LMC halo or spheroid models are favored by the combined MACHO and EROS microlensing results.
  • The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain, starting in 2015, multiple images of the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg$^2$ region about 1000 times during the anticipated 10 years of operations (distributed over six bands, $ugrizy$). Each 30-second long visit will deliver 5$\sigma$ depth for point sources of $r\sim24.5$ on average. The co-added map will be about 3 magnitudes deeper, and will include 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars. We discuss various measurements that will be automatically performed for these 20 billion sources, and how they can be used for classification and determination of source physical and other properties. We provide a few classification examples based on SDSS data, such as color classification of stars, color-spatial proximity search for wide-angle binary stars, orbital-color classification of asteroid families, and the recognition of main Galaxy components based on the distribution of stars in the position-metallicity-kinematics space. Guided by these examples, we anticipate that two grand classification challenges for LSST will be 1) rapid and robust classification of sources detected in difference images, and 2) {\it simultaneous} treatment of diverse astrometric and photometric time series measurements for an unprecedentedly large number of objects.
  • AM CVn systems are a select group of ultracompact binaries with the shortest orbital periods of any known binary subclass; mass-transfer is likely from a low-mass (partially-)degenerate secondary onto a white dwarf primary, driven by gravitational radiation. In the past few years, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has provided five new AM CVns. Here we report on two further candidates selected from more recent SDSS data. SDSS J1208+3550 is similar to the earlier SDSS discoveries, recognized as an AM CVn via its distinctive spectrum which is dominated by helium emission. From the expanded SDSS Data Release 6 (DR6) spectroscopic area, we provide an updated surface density estimate for such AM CVns of order 10^{-3.1} to 10^{-2.5} per deg^2 for 15<g<20.5. In addition, we present another new candidate AM CVn, SDSS J2047+0008, that was discovered in the course of followup of SDSS-II supernova candidates. It shows nova-like outbursts in multi-epoch imaging data; in contrast to the other SDSS AM CVn discoveries, its (outburst) spectrum is dominated by helium absorption lines, reminiscent of KL Dra and 2003aw. The variability selection of SDSS J2047+0008 from the 300 deg^2 of SDSS Stripe 82 presages further AM CVn discoveries in future deep, multicolor, and time-domain surveys such as LSST. The new additions bring the total SDSS yield to seven AM CVns thus far, a substantial contribution to this rare subclass, versus the dozen previously known.
  • We present ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope optical observations of the X-ray flash (XRF) 020903, covering 300 days. The afterglow showed a very rapid rise in the first day, followed by a relatively slow decay in the next few days. There was a clear bump in the light curve after ~25 days, accompanied by a drastic change in the spectral energy distribution. The light curve and the spectral energy distribution are naturally interpreted as the emergence -- and subsequent decay -- of a supernova (SN), similar to SN 1998bw. At peak luminosity, the SN is estimated to be 0.8 +/- 0.1 mag fainter than SN1998bw. This argues in favor of the existence of a supernova associated with this X-ray flash. A spectrum obtained 35 days after the burst shows emission lines from the host galaxy. We use this spectrum to put an upper limit on the oxygen abundance of the host at [O/H] < -0.6 dex. We also discuss a possible trend between the softness of several bursts and the early behavior of the optical afterglow, in the sense that XRFs and X-ray rich GRBs seem to have a plateau phase or even a rising light curve. This can be naturally explained in models where XRFs are similar to GRBs but seen off the jet axis.
  • Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in just 4.5 square degrees, we find tau = 2.17^{+0.47}_{-0.38} x 10^{-6} at (l,b) = (1.50, -2.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients (1.06 +/- 0.71) x 10^{-6} deg^{-1} and (0.29 +/- 0.43) x 10^{-6} deg^{-1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3.11, -3.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.
  • We present a catalog of 450 high signal-to-noise microlensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration between 1993 and 1999. The events are distributed throughout our fields and, as expected, they show clear concentration toward the Galactic center. No optical depth is given for this sample since no blending efficiency calculation has been performed, and we find evidence for substantial blending. In a companion paper we give optical depths for the sub-sample of events on clump giant source stars, where blending is not a significant effect. Several events with sources that may belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy are identified. For these events even relatively low dispersion spectra could suffice to classify these events as either consistent with Sagittarius membership or as non-Sagittarius sources. Several unusual events, such as microlensing of periodic variable source stars, binary lens events, and an event showing extended source effects are identified. We also identify a number of contaminating background events as cataclysmic variable stars.
  • We report the weak lensing discovery, spectroscopic confirmation, and weak lensing tomography of a massive cluster of galaxies at $z=0.68$, demonstrating that shear selection of clusters works at redshifts high enough to be cosmologically interesting. The mass estimate from weak lensing, $11.1 +- 2.8 x 10^{14} (r/Mpc)$ solar masses within projected radius r, agrees with that derived from the spectroscopy ($\sigma_v = 980 km s^{-1}$), and with the position of an arc which is likely to be a strongly lensed background galaxy. The redshift estimate from weak lensing tomography is consistent with the spectroscopy, demonstrating the feasibility of baryon-unbiased mass surveys. This tomographic technique will be able to roughly identify the redshifts of any dark clusters which may appear in shear-selected samples, up to z ~ 1.
  • We describe a few recent microlensing results from the MACHO Collaboration. The aim of the MACHO Project was the identification and quantitative description of dark and luminous matter in the Milky Way using microlensing toward the Magellanic Clouds and Galactic bulge. We start with a discussion of the HST follow-up observations of the microlensing events toward the LMC detected in the first 5 years of the experiment. Using color-magnitude diagrams we attempt to distinguish between two possible locations of the microlensing sources: 1) in the LMC or 2) behind the LMC. We conclude that unless the extinction is extremely patchy, it is very unlikely that most of the LMC events have sources behind the LMC. During an examination of the HST images of the 13 LMC events we found a very red object next to the source star of event LMC-5. Astrometry, microlensing parallax fit, and a spectrum suggest that in this case we directly image the lens - a low-mass disk star. Then we focus on the majority of events observed by the MACHO Project, which are detected toward the Galactic bulge. We argue that the microlensing optical depth toward the bulge is best measured using events that have clump giant sources, which are almost unaffected by blending. From this sample we derive a low optical depth toward the Galactic bulge of (1.4 +/- 0.3) x 10^{-6}, in good agreement with other observational constraints and with theoretical models. The presence of many long-duration events among the bulge candidates allows us to investigate the microlensing parallax effect. Events with the strongest parallax signal are probably due to massive remnants. Events MACHO-96-BLG-5 and MACHO-98-BLG-6 might have been caused by the 6-solar-mass black holes.
  • The Deep Lens Survey (DLS) is a deep BVRz' imaging survey of seven 2x2 degree fields, with all data to be made public. The primary scientific driver is weak gravitational lensing, but the survey is also designed to enable a wide array of other astrophysical investigations. A unique feature of this survey is the search for transient phenomena. We subtract multiple exposures of a field, detect differences, classify, and release transients on the Web within about an hour of observation. Here we summarize the scientific goals of the DLS, field and filter selection, observing techniques and current status, data reduction, data products and release, and transient detections. Finally, we discuss some lessons which might apply to future large surveys such as LSST.
  • We present 47 spectroscopically-confirmed quasars discovered behind the Magellanic Clouds identified via photometric variability in the MACHO database. Thirty-eight quasars lie behind the Large Magellanic Cloud and nine behind the Small Magellanic Cloud, more than tripling the number of quasars previously known in this region. The quasars cover the redshift interval 0.2 < z < 2.8 and apparent mean magnitudes 16.6 < V < 20.1. We discuss the details of quasar candidate selection based on time variability in the MACHO database and present results of spectroscopic follow-up observations. Our follow-up detection efficiency was 20%; the primary contaminants were emission-line Be stars in Magellanic Clouds. For the 47 quasars discovered behind the Magellanic Clouds plus an additional 12 objects previously identified in this region, we present 7.5-year MACHO V- and R-band lightcurves with average sampling times of 2-10 days.
  • We present an re-analysis of the longest timescale gravitational microlensing event discovered to date: MACHO-99-BLG-22/OGLE-1999-BUL-32, which was discovered by both the MACHO and OGLE microlensing alert systems. Our analysis of this microlensing parallax event includes a likelihood analysis of the lens position based upon a standard model of the Galactic velocity distribution, and this implies that the lens could be a black hole of ~100 M_solar at a distance of a few hundred parsecs in the Galactic disk or a massive stellar remnant (black hole or neutron star) in the Galactic bulge. Our new analysis includes data from the MACHO, GMAN, and MPS collaborations in addition to the OGLE data used in a previous analysis by Mao et al (2002). The crucial feature that distinguishes our analysis from that of Mao et al is an accurate constraint on the direction of lens motion and an analysis of the implications of this direction.
  • We present UBVRIz lightcurves of the Type Ia SN 1999ee and the Type Ib/c SN 1999ex, both located in the galaxy IC 5179. SN 1999ee has an extremely well sampled lightcurve spanning from 10 days before Bmax through 53 days after peak. Near maximum we find systematic differences ~0.05 mag in photometry measured with two different telescopes, even though the photometry is reduced to the same local standards around the supernova using the specific color terms for each instrumental system. We use models for our bandpasses and spectrophotometry of SN 1999ee to derive magnitude corrections (S-corrections) and remedy this problem. This exercise demonstrates the need of accurately characterizing the instrumental system before great photometric accuracies of Type Ia supernovae can be claimed. It also shows that this effect can have important astrophysical consequences since a small systematic shift of 0.02 mag in the B-V color can introduce a 0.08 mag error in the extinction corrected peak B magnitudes of a supernova and thus lead to biased cosmological parameters. The data for the Type Ib/c SN 1999ex present us with the first ever observed shock breakout of a supernova of this class. These observations show that shock breakout occurred 18 days before Bmax and support the idea that Type Ib/c supernovae are due to core collapse of massive stars rather than thermonuclear disruption of white dwarfs.
  • We present an analysis of the longest timescale microlensing events discovered by the MACHO Collaboration during a 7 year survey of the Galactic bulge. We find 6 events that exhibit very strong microlensing parallax signals due, in part, to accurate photometric data from the GMAN and MPS collaborations. The microlensing parallax fit parameters are used in a likelihood analysis, which is able to estimate the distance and masses of the lens objects based upon a standard model of the Galactic velocity distribution. This analysis indicates that the most likely masses of 5 of the 6 lenses are > 1 Msun, which suggests that a substantial fraction of the Galactic lenses may be massive stellar remnants. This could explain the observed excess of long timescale microlensing events. The lenses for events MACHO-96-BLG-5 and MACHO-98-BLG-6 are the most massive, with mass estimates of M/Msun = 6 +10/-3 and M/Msun = 6 +7/-3, respectively. The observed upper limits on the absolute brightness of main sequence stars for these lenses are < 1 Lsun, so both lenses are black hole candidates. The black hole interpretation is also favored by a likelihood analysis with a Bayesian prior using a conventional model for the lens mass function. We consider the possibility that the source stars for some of these 6 events may lie in the foreground or background of the Galactic bulge, but we find that this is unlikely. Future HST observations of these events can either confirm the black hole lens hypothesis or detect the lens stars and provide a direct measurement of their masses. Future observations of similar events by SIM or the Keck or VLTI interferometers will allow direct measurements of the lens masses for stellar remnant lenses as well.
  • We present preliminary results of the analysis of 5 years of MACHO data on the Galactic bulge microlensing events with clump giants as sources. This class of events allows one to obtain robust conclusions because relatively bright clump stars are not strongly affected by blending. We discuss: 1) the selection of `giant' events, 2) the distribution of event durations, 3) the anomalous character of event durations and optical depth in the MACHO field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3.1, -3.0). We report the preliminary average optical depth of (2.0 +/- 0.4) x 10^{-6} (internal) at (l,b) = (3.9, -3.8), and present a map of the spatial distribution of the optical depth. When field 104 is removed from the sample, the optical depth drops to (1.4 +/- 0.3) x 10^{-6}, which is in excellent agreement with infrared-based models of the central Galactic region.
  • We attempt to determine whether the MACHO microlensing source stars are drawn from the average population of the LMC or from a population behind the LMC by examining the HST color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of microlensing source stars. We present WFPC2 HST photometry of eight MACHO microlensing source stars and the surrounding fields in the LMC. The microlensing source stars are identified by deriving accurate centroids in the ground-based MACHO images using difference image analysis (DIA) and then transforming the DIA coordinates to the HST frame. We consider in detail a model for the background population of source stars based on that presented by Zhao, Graff & Guhathakurta. In this model, the source stars have an additional reddening <E(B-V)> = 0.13 mag and a slightly larger distance modulus <Delta mu> ~ 0.3 mag than the average LMC population. We also investigate a series of source star models, varying the relative fraction of source stars drawn from the average and background populations and the displacement of the background population from the LMC. Due to the small number of analyzed events the distribution of probabilities of different models is rather flat. A shallow maximum occurs at a fraction s_LMC ~ 0.8 of the source stars in the LMC. This is consistent with the interpretation that a significant fraction of observed microlensing events are due to lenses in the Milky Way halo, but does not definitively exclude other models.
  • We present preliminary results of the analysis of 5 years of MACHO data on the Galactic bulge microlensing events with clump giants as sources. In particular, we discuss: 1) the selection of `giant' events, 2) distribution of impact parameters, 3) distribution of event durations, 4) the concentration of long duration events in MACHO field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3.1,-3.0). We report the preliminary average optical depth of (2.0 +/- 0.4) x 10^{-6} (internal) at (l,b) = (3.9,-3.8). We discuss future work and prospects for building a coherent model of the Galaxy.
  • The MACHO project is a search for dark matter in the form of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs). The project has photometrically monitored tens of millions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and Galactic bulge in search of rare gravitational microlensing events caused by these otherwise invisible objects. In 5.7 years of observations toward the LMC some 13-17 microlensing events have been observed by the MACHO survey, allowing powerful statements to be made about the nature of the dark population in the halo of our Galaxy. A critical component of these statements is an accurate determination of the survey's detection efficiency. The detection efficiency is a complicated function of temporal sampling, stellar crowding (the luminosity function), image quality, photometry, time-series analysis, and criteria used to select the microlensing candidates. Such a complex interdependence is most naturally solved using a Monte Carlo approach. Here we describe the details of the Monte Carlo used to calculate the efficiency presented in the MACHO 5.7-year LMC results. Here we correct several shortcomings of past determinations, including (1) adding fainter source stars (2.5 magnitudes below our faintest detected "stars"), (2) an up-to-date luminosity function for the LMC, (3) better sampling of real images in both stellar density and observing conditions, (4) an improved scheme for adding artificial microlensing onto a random sample of real lightcurves, and many other improvements. [Abridged]
  • We present a 9 million star color-magnitude diagram (9M CMD) of the LMC bar. The 9M CMD reveals a complex superposition of different age and metallicity stellar populations, with important stellar evolutionary phases occurring over 3 orders of magnitude in number density. First, we count the non-variable supergiants, the associated Cepheids, and measure the effective temperatures defining the instability strip. Lifetime predictions of stellar evolution theory are tested, with implications for the origin of low-luminosity Cepheids. The highly-evolved AGB stars have a bimodal distribution in brightness, which we interpret as discrete old populations (>1 Gyr). The faint AGB may be metal-poor and very old. We identify the clusters NGC 411 and M3 as templates for the admixture of old stellar populations. However, there are indications that the old and metal-poor field population has a red HB morphology: the RR Lyraes lie on the red edge of the instability strip, the AGB-bump is very red, and the ratio of AGB-bump stars to RR Lyraes is quite large. If the HB second parameter is age, the old and metal-poor field population likely formed after the oldest clusters. Lifetime predictions of stellar evolution theory lead us to associate a significant fraction of the red HB clump giants with the same old and metal-poor population producing the RR Lyraes and the AGB-bump. In this case, compared to the age-dependent luminosity predictions of stellar evolution theory, the red HB clump is too bright relative to the RR Lyraes and AGB-bump. Last, the surface density profile of RR Lyraes is fit by an exponential, favoring a disk-like rather than spheroidal distribution. We conclude that the age of the LMC disk is probably similar to the age of the Galactic disk. (ABRIDGED)
  • We report on our search for microlensing towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Analysis of 5.7 years of photometry on 11.9 million stars in the LMC reveals 13 - 17 microlensing events. This is significantly more than the $\sim$ 2 to 4 events expected from lensing by known stellar populations. The timescales ($\that$) of the events range from 34 to 230 days. We estimate the microlensing optical depth towards the LMC from events with $2 < \that < 400$ days to be 1.2 ^{+0.4}_ {-0.3} \ten{-7}$, with an additional 20% to 30% of systematic error. The spatial distribution of events is mildly inconsistent with LMC/LMC disk self-lensing, but is consistent with an extended lens distribution such as a Milky Way or LMC halo. Interpreted in the context of a Galactic dark matter halo, consisting partially of compact objects, a maximum likelihood analysis gives a MACHO halo fraction of 20% for a typical halo model with a 95% confidence interval of 8% to 50%. A 100% MACHO halo is ruled out at the 95% C.L. for all except our most extreme halo model. Interpreted as a Galactic halo population, the most likely MACHO mass is between $ 0.15 \msun$ and $ 0.9 \msun$, depending on the halo model, and the total mass in MACHOs out to 50 kpc is found to be 9+4-3 10^{10} msun, independent of the halo model. These results are marginally consistent with our previous results, but are lower by about a factor of two. Besides a larger data set, this work also includes an improved efficiency determination, improved likelihood analysis, and more thorough testing of systematic errors, especially with respect to the treatment of potential backgrounds to microlensing, such as supernovae in galaxies behind the LMC. [Abridged]
  • The study of extra-solar planetary systems has emerged as a new discipline of observational astronomy in the past few years with the discovery of a number of extra-solar planets. The properties of most of these extra-solar planets were not anticipated by theoretical work on the formation of planetary systems. Here we report observations and light curve modeling of gravitational microlensing event MACHO-97-BLG-41, which indicates that the lens system consists of a planet orbiting a binary star system. According to this model, the mass ratio of the binary star system is 3.8:1 and the stars are most likely to be a late K dwarf and an M dwarf with a separation of about 1.8 AU. A planet of about 3 Jupiter masses orbits this system at a distance of about 7 AU. If our interpretation of this light curve is correct, it represents the first discovery of a planet orbiting a binary star system and the first detection of a Jovian planet via the gravitational microlensing technique. It suggests that giant planets may be common in short period binary star systems.
  • The MACHO collaboration has been carrying out Difference Image Analysis (DIA) since 1996 with the aim of increasing the sensitivity to the detection of gravitational microlensing. This is a preliminary report on the application of DIA to galactic bulge images in one field. We show how the DIA technique significantly increases the number of detected lensing events, by removing the positional dependence of traditional photometry schemes and lowering the microlensing event detection threshold. This technique, unlike PSF photometry, gives the unblended colours and positions of the microlensing source stars. We present a set of criteria for selecting microlensing events from objects discovered with this technique. The 16 pixel and classical microlensing events discovered with the DIA technique are presented.