• The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is one of the largest contemporary spectroscopic surveys of low-redshift galaxies. Covering an area of ~286 deg^2 (split among five survey regions) down to a limiting magnitude of r < 19.8 mag, we have collected spectra and reliable redshifts for 238,000 objects using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. In addition, we have assembled imaging data from a number of independent surveys in order to generate photometry spanning the wavelength range 1 nm - 1 m. Here we report on the recently completed spectroscopic survey and present a series of diagnostics to assess its final state and the quality of the redshift data. We also describe a number of survey aspects and procedures, or updates thereof, including changes to the input catalogue, redshifting and re-redshifting, and the derivation of ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry. Finally, we present the second public release of GAMA data. In this release we provide input catalogue and targeting information, spectra, redshifts, ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared photometry, single-component S\'ersic fits, stellar masses, H$\alpha$-derived star formation rates, environment information, and group properties for all galaxies with r < 19.0 mag in two of our survey regions, and for all galaxies with r < 19.4 mag in a third region (72,225 objects in total). The database serving these data is available at http://www.gama-survey.org/.
  • The Herschel Space Observatory has had a tremendous impact on the study of extragalactic dust. Specifically, early-type galaxies (ETG) have been the focus of several studies. In this paper we combine results from two Herschel studies - a Virgo cluster study HeViCS and a broader, low-redshift H-ATLAS/GAMA study - and contrast the dust and associated properties for similar mass galaxies. This comparison is motivated by differences in results exhibited between multiple Herschel studies of early-type galaxies. A comparison between consistent modified blackbody derived dust mass is carried out, revealing strong differences between the two samples in both dust mass and dust-to-stellar mass ratio. In particular, the HeViCS sample lacks massive ETG with as high a specific dust content as found in H-ATLAS. This is most likely connected with the difference in environment for the two samples. We calculate nearest neighbour environment densities in a consistent way, showing that H-ATLAS ETG occupy sparser regions of the local Universe, whereas HeViCS ETG occupy dense regions. This is also true for ETG that are not Herschel-detected but are in the Virgo and GAMA parent samples. Spectral energy distributions are fit to the panchromatic data. From these we find that in H-ATLAS the specific star formation rate anticorrelates with stellar mass and reaches values as high as in our Galaxy. On the other hand HeViCS ETG appear to have little star formation. Based on the trends found here, H-ATLAS ETG are thought to have more extended star formation histories and a younger stellar population than HeViCS ETG.
  • In this work we investigate in detail the effects local environment (groups and pairs) has on galaxies with stellar mass similar to the Milky-Way (L* galaxies). A volume limited sample of 6,150 galaxies is classified to determine emission features, morphological type and presence of a disk. This sample allows for characteristics of galaxies to be isolated (e.g. stellar mass and group halo mass), and their codependencies determined. We observe that galaxy-galaxy interactions play the most important role in shaping the evolution within a group halo, the main role of halo mass is in gathering the galaxies together to encourage such interactions. Dominant pair galaxies find their overall star formation enhanced when the pair's mass ratio is close to 1, otherwise we observe the same galaxies as we would in an unpaired system. The minor galaxy in a pair is greatly affected by its companion galaxy, and whilst the star forming fraction is always suppressed relative to equivalent stellar mass unpaired galaxies, it becomes lower still when the mass ratio of a pair system increases. We find that, in general, the close galaxy-galaxy interaction rate drops as a function of halo mass for a given amount of stellar mass. We find evidence of a local peak of interactions for Milky-Way stellar mass galaxies in Milky-Way halo mass groups. Low mass halos, and in particular Local Group mass halos, are an important environment for understanding the typical evolutionary path of a unit of stellar mass. We find compelling evidence for galaxy conformity in both groups and pairs, where morphological type conformity is dominant in groups, and emission class conformity is dominant in pairs. This suggests that group scale conformity is the result of many galaxy encounters over an extended period of time, whilst pair conformity is a fairly instantaneous response to a transitory interaction.
  • One of the complexities in modelling integrated spectra of stellar populations is the effect of interacting binary stars besides type Ia supernovae (SNeIa). These include common envelope systems, CVs, novae, and are usually ignored in models predicting the chemistry and spectral absorption line strengths in galaxies. In this paper predictions of chemical yields from populations of single and binary stars are incorporated into a galactic chemical evolution model to explore the significance of the effects of these other binary yields. Effects on spectral line strengths from different progenitor channels of SNeIa are also explored. Small systematic effects are found when the yields from binaries, other than SNeIa, are included, for a given star formation history. These effects are, at present, within the observational uncertainties on the line strengths. More serious differences can arise in considering different types of SNIa models, their rates and contributions.
  • This paper is part of a series devoted to the study of the stellar populations in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), aimed at setting constraints on the formation and evolution of these objects. We have obtained high signal-to-noise ratio, long-slit spectra of 49 BCGs in the nearby Universe. Here, we derive Single Stellar Population (SSP)-equivalent ages, metallicities and alpha-abundance ratios in the centres of the galaxies using the Lick/IDS system of absorption line indices. We systematically compare the indices and derived parameters for the BCGs with those of large samples of ordinary elliptical galaxies in the same mass range. We find no significant differences between the index-velocity dispersion relations of the BCG data and those of normal ellipticals, but we do find subtle differences between the derived SSP-parameters. The BCGs show, on average, higher metallicity ([Z/H]) and alpha-abundance ([E/Fe]) values. We analyse possible correlations between the derived parameters and the internal properties of the galaxies (velocity dispersion, rotation, luminosity) and those of the host clusters (density, mass, distance from BCG to X-ray peak, presence of cooling flows), with the aim of dissentangling if the BCG properties are more influenced by their internal or host cluster properties. The SSP-parameters show very little dependence on the mass or luminosity of the galaxies, or the mass or density of the host clusters. Of this sample, 26 per cent show luminosity-weighted ages younger than 6 Gyr, probably a consequence of recent - if small - episodes of star formation. In agreement with previous studies, the BCGs with intermediate ages tend to be found in cooling-flow clusters with large X-ray excess.
  • This is the first of a series of papers devoted to the investigation of a large sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), their kinematic and stellar population properties, and the relationships between those and the properties of the cluster. We have obtained high signal-to-noise ratio, long-slit spectra of these galaxies with Gemini and WHT with the primary purpose of investigating their stellar population properties. This paper describes the selection methods and criteria used to compile a new sample of galaxies, concentrating on BCGs previously classified as containing a halo (cD galaxies), together with the observations and data reduction. Here, we present the full sample of galaxies, and the measurement and interpretation of the radial velocity and velocity dispersion profiles of 41 BCGs. We find clear rotation curves for a number of these giant galaxies. In particular, we find rapid rotation (> 100 km/s) for two BCGs, NGC6034 and NGC7768, indicating that it is unlikely that they formed through dissipationless mergers. Velocity substructure in the form of kinematically decoupled cores is detected in 12 galaxies, and we find five galaxies with velocity dispersion increasing with radius. The amount of rotation, the velocity substructure and the position of BCGs on the anisotropy-luminosity diagram are very similar to those of "ordinary" giant ellipticals in high density environments.
  • Stellar population characteristics are presented for a sample of low luminosity early-type galaxies (LLEs) in order to compare them with their more luminous counterparts. Long-slit spectra of a sample of 10 LLEs were taken with the ESO New Technology Telescope, selected for their low luminosities. Line strengths were measured on the Lick standard system. Lick indices for these LLEs were correlated with velocity dispersion (sigma), alongside published data for a variety of Hubble types. The LLEs were found to fall below an extrapolation of the correlation for luminous ellipticals and were consistent with the locations of spiral bulges in plots of line strengths versus sigma. Luminosity weighted average ages, metallicities and abundance ratios were estimated from chi-squared fitting of 19 Lick indices to predictions from simple stellar population models. The LLEs appear younger than luminous ellipticals and of comparable ages to spiral bulges. These LLEs show a bimodal metallicity distribution, consisting of a low metallicity group (possibly misclassified dwarf spheroidal galaxies) and a high metallicity group (similar to spiral bulges). Finally, they have low alpha-element to iron-peak abundance ratios indicative of slow, extended star formation.
  • Massive halos of hot plasma exist around some, but not all elliptical galaxies. There is evidence that this is related to the age of the galaxy. In this paper new X-ray observations are presented for three early-type galaxies that show evidence of youth, in order to investigate their X-ray components and properties. NGC 5363 and NGC 2865 were found to have X-ray emission dominated by purely discrete stellar sources. Limits are set on the mass distribution in one of the galaxies observed with XMM-Newton, NGC 4382, which contains significant hot gas. We detect the X-ray emission in NGC 4382 out to 4r$_e$. The mass-to-light ratio is consistent with a stellar origin in the inner regions but rises steadily to values indicative of some dark matter by 4r$_e$. These results are set in context with other data drawn from the literature, for galaxies with ages estimated from dynamical or spectroscopic indicators. Ages obtained from optical spectroscopy represent central luminosity weighted stellar ages. We examine the X-ray evolution with age, normalised by B and K band luminosities. Low values of Log(L$_X$/L$_B$) and Log(L$_X$/L$_K$) are found for all galaxies with ages between 1 and 4 Gyrs. Luminous X-ray emission only appears in older galaxies. This suggests that the interstellar medium is removed and then it takes several gigayears for hot gas halos to build up, following a merger. A possible mechanism for gas expulsion might be associated with feedback from an active nucleus triggered during a merger.
  • We follow the chemical evolution of a galaxy through star formation and its feedback into the inter-stellar medium, starting from primordial gas and allowing for gas to inflow into the region being modelled. We attempt to reproduce observed spectral line-strengths for early-type galaxies to constrain their star formation histories. The efficiencies and times of star formation are varied as well as the amount and duration of inflow. We evaluate the chemical enrichment and the mass of stars made with time. Single stellar population (SSP) data are then used to predict line-strengths for composite stellar populations. The results are compared with observed line-strengths in ten ellipticals, including some features which help to break the problem of age-metallicity degeneracy in old stellar populations. We find that the elliptical galaxies modelled require high metallicity SSPs (>3 x solar) at later times. In addition the strong lines observed cannot be produced by an initial starburst in primordial gas, even if a large amount of inflow is allowed for during the first few x 10E+8 years. This is because some pre-enrichment is required for lines in the bulk of the stars to approach the observed line-strengths in ellipticals.