• The measurement of the Sun's diameter has been first tackled by the Greek astronomers from a geometric point of view. Their estimation of ~1800", although incorrect, was not truly called into question for several centuries. The first pioneer works for measuring the Sun's diameter with an astrometric precision were made around the year 1660 by Gabriel Mouton, then by Picard and La Hire. A canonical value of the solar radius of 959".63 was adopted by Auwers in 1891. Despite considerable efforts during the second half of the XXth century, involving dedicated space instruments, no consensus was reached on this issue. However, with the advent of high sensitivity instruments on board satellites, such as the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), it was possible to extract with an unprecedented accuracy the surface gravity oscillation f modes, over nearly two solar cycles, from 1996 to 2017. Their analysis in the range of angular degree l=140-300 shows that the so-called "seismic radius" exhibits a temporal variability in anti-phase with the solar activity. Even if the link between the two radii (photospheric and seismic) can be made only through modeling, such measurements provide an interesting alternative which led to a revision of the standard solar radius by the International Astronomical Union in 2015. This new look on such modern measurements of the Sun's global changes from 1996 to 2017 gives a new way for peering into the solar interior, mainly to better understand the subsurface fields which play an important role in the implementation of the solar cycles.
  • The precise shape of the Sun is sensitive to the influence of gravity, differential rotation, local turbulence and magnetic fields. It has been previously shown that the solar shape exhibits asphericity that evolves with the 11-year cycle. Thanks to the capability of the SoHO/MDI and SDO/HMI instruments to observe with an unprecedented accuracy the surface gravity oscillation (f) modes, it is possible to extract information concerning the coefficients of rotational frequency splitting, a1, a3 and a5, that measure the differential rotation, together with the a2, a4 and a6 asphericity coefficients. Analysis of these helioseismology data for almost two solar cycles, from 1996 to 2017, reveals a close correlation of the a1 and a5 coefficients with the solar activity, whilst a3 exhibits a long-term trend and a weak correlation in the current cycle indicating a substantial change of the global rotation, potentially associated with a long-term evolution of the solar cycles. Looking in more details, the asphericity coefficients, a2, a4 and a6 are more strongly associated with the solar cycle when applying a time lag of respectively 0.1, 1.6 and -1.6 years. The magnitude of a6-coefficient varies in phase with the sunspot number (SN), but its amplitude is ahead of the SN variation. The last measurements made in mid 2017 indicate that the magnitude of a6-coefficient has probably reached its minimum; therefore, the next solar minimum can be expected by the end of 2018 or in the beginning of 2019. The so-called seismic radius in the range of f-mode angular degree: l=137-299 exhibits a temporal variability in anti-phase with the solar activity; its relative value decreased by 2.3E-05 in Solar Cycle 23 and 1.7E-05 in Cycle 24. Such results will be useful for better understanding the physical mechanisms which act inside the Sun, and so, better constrain dynamo models for forecasting the solar cycles.
  • Recent advances in helioseismology, numerical simulations and mean-field theory of solar differential rotation have shown that the meridional circulation pattern may consist of two or more cells in each hemisphere of the convection zone. According to the mean-field theory the double-cell circulation pattern can result from the sign inversion of a nondiffusive part of the radial angular momentum transport (the so-called $\Lambda$-effect) in the lower part of the solar convection zone. Here, we show that this phenomenon {can result} from the radial inhomogeneity of the Coriolis number, which depends on the convective turnover time. We demonstrate that if this effect is taken into account then the solar-like differential rotation and the double-cell meridional circulation are both reproduced by the mean-field model. The model is consistent with the distribution of turbulent velocity correlations determined from observations by tracing motions of sunspots and large-scale magnetic fields, indicating that these tracers are rooted just below the shear layer.
  • We study flare processes in the solar atmosphere using observational data for a M1-class flare of June 12, 2014, obtained by New Solar Telescope (NST/BBSO) and Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI/SDO). The main goal is to understand triggers and manifestations of the flare energy release in the photosphere and chromosphere using high-resolution optical observations and magnetic field measurements. We analyze optical images, HMI Dopplergrams and vector magnetograms, and use Non-Linear Force-Free Field (NLFFF) extrapolations for reconstruction of the magnetic topology and electric currents. The NLFFF modelling reveals interaction of two magnetic flux ropes with oppositely directed magnetic field in the PIL. These flux ropes are observed as a compact sheared arcade along the PIL in the high-resolution broad-band continuum images from NST. In the vicinity of PIL, the NST H alpha observations reveal formation of a thin three-ribbon structure corresponding to a small-scale photospheric magnetic arcade. The observational results evidence in favor of location of the primary energy release site in the chromospheric plasma with strong electric currents concentrated near the polarity inversion line. In this case, magnetic reconnection is triggered by the interacting magnetic flux ropes forming a current sheet elongated along the PIL.
  • Chromospheric evaporation is observed as Doppler blueshift during solar flares. It plays one of key roles in dynamics and energetics of solar flares, however, its mechanism is still unknown. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of spatially-resolved multi-wavelength observations of chromospheric evaporation during an M 1.0 class solar flare (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) using data from the NASA's IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) and HMI/SDO (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory) telescopes, and VIS/NST (Visible Imaging Spectrometer at New Solar Telescope) high-resolution observations, covering the temperature range from 10^4 K to 10^7 K. The results show that the averaged over the region Fe XXI blueshift of the hot evaporating plasma is delayed relative to the C II redshift of the relatively cold chromospheric plasma by about 1 min. The spatial distribution of the delays is not uniform across the region and can be as long as 2 min in several zones. Using vector magnetograms from HMI we reconstruct the magnetic field topology and the quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) and find that the blueshift delay regions as well as the H-alpha flare ribbons are connected to the region of magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) and an expanding flux rope via a system of low-lying loop arcades with height < ~4.5 Mm. This allows us to propose an interpretation of the chromospheric evaporation based on the geometry of local magnetic fields, and the primary energy source associated with the PIL.
  • Using mean-field hydrodynamic models of the solar angular momentum balance we show that the non-monotonic latitudinal dependence of the radial angular momentum fluxes caused by Lambda-effect can affect the number of the meridional circulation cells stacking in radial direction in the solar convection zone. In particular, our results show the possibility of a complicated triple-cell meridional circulation structure. This pattern consists of two large counterclockwise circulation cells (the N-hemisphere) and a smaller clockwise cell located at low latitudes at the bottom of the convection zone.
  • We explore a response of a non-linear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation which is anchored at r=0.9R has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric with respect to the equator perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric field depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number R_m. In the range of R_m=10^{4-6} the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a non-linear alpha-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of "active longitudes" with cyclic 180 degree "flip-flop" changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However this effect disappears in the model which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period, and carries important information about the dynamo process.
  • Magnetic fields are usually observed in the quiet Sun as small-scale elements that cover the entire solar surface (the `salt and pepper' patterns in line-of-sight magnetograms). By using 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations we find that these fields result from a local dynamo action in the top layers of the convection zone, where extremely weak 'seed' magnetic fields (e.g., from a $10^{-6}$ G) can locally grow above the mean equipartition field, to a stronger than 2000~G field localized in magnetic structures. Our results reveal that the magnetic flux is predominantly generated in regions of small-scale helical downflows. We find that the local dynamo action takes place mostly in a shallow, about 500~km deep, subsurface layer, from which the generated field is transported into the deeper layers by convective downdrafts. We demonstrate that the observed dominance of vertical magnetic fields at the photosphere and horizontal fields above the photosphere can be explained by small-scale magnetic loops produced by the dynamo. Such small-scale loops play an important role in the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere and that their detection in observations is critical for understanding the local dynamo action on the Sun.
  • A new fitting methodology is presented which is equally well suited for the estimation of low-, medium-, and high-degree mode parameters from $m$-averaged solar oscillation power spectra of widely differing spectral resolution. This method, which we call the "Windowed, MuLTiple-Peak, averaged spectrum", or WMLTP Method, constructs a theoretical profile by convolving the weighted sum of the profiles of the modes appearing in the fitting box with the power spectrum of the window function of the observing run using weights from a leakage matrix that takes into account both observational and physical effects, such as the distortion of modes by solar latitudinal differential rotation. We demonstrate that the WMLTP Method makes substantial improvements in the inferences of the properties of the solar oscillations in comparison with a previous method that employed a single profile to represent each spectral peak. We also present an inversion for the internal solar structure which is based upon 6,366 modes that we have computed using the WMLTP method on the 66-day long 2010 SOHO/MDI Dynamics Run. To improve both the numerical stability and reliability of the inversion we developed a new procedure for the identification and correction of outliers in a frequency data set. We present evidence for a pronounced departure of the sound speed in the outer half of the solar convection zone and in the subsurface shear layer from the radial sound speed profile contained in Model~S of Christensen-Dalsgaard and his collaborators that existed in the rising phase of Solar Cycle~24 during mid-2010.
  • We present analysis of C7.0 solar flare of Febrary 17, 2013, revealing a strong helioseismic response (sunquake) caused by a very compact impact in the photosphere. This is the weakest known C-class flare generating a sunquake event. To investigate possible mechanisms of this event, and to understand the role of accelerated charged particles and photospheric electric currents, we use data from three space observatories: Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). We find that the photospheric flare impact does not spatially correspond to the strongest HXR emission source, but both of these events are parts of the same energy release. Our analysis reveals a close association of the flare energy release with a rapid increase of the electric currents, and suggests that the sunquake initiation is unlikely to be explained by the impact of high-energy electrons but may be associated with a rapid current dissipation or a localized impulsive Lorentz force.
  • Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains the flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of C2.1 flare of August 15, 2013, observed with New Solar Telescope (NST) of Big Bear Solar Observatory, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), GOES and FERMI spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of the flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe red-blue asymmetry of H alpha flare ribbons with a width as small as 100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be responsible for energization of H alpha knots in the ribbons.
  • We study how anisotropy of turbulent convection affects diffusion of large-scale magnetic fields and the dynamo process on the Sun. The effect of anisotropy is calculated in a mean-field magneto-hydrodynamics framework using the minimal $\tau$-approximation. We examine two types of mean-field dynamo models: the well-known benchmark flux-transport model, and a distributed-dynamo model with the subsurface rotational shear layer. For both models we investigate effects of the double-cell meridional circulation, recently suggested by helioseismology. We introduce a parameter of anisotropy as a ratio of the radial and horizontal intensity of turbulent mixing, to characterize the anisotropy effects. It is found that the anisotropy of turbulent convection affects the distribution of magnetic fields inside the convection zone. The concentration of the magnetic flux near the bottom and top boundaries of the convection zone is greater when the anisotropy is stronger. It is shown that the critical dynamo number and the dynamo period approach to constant values for the large anisotropy parameter. The anisotropy reduces the overlap of the toroidal fields of subsequent cycles in the time-latitude ``butterfly' diagram. If we assume that sunspots are formed in the vicinity of the subsurface shear layer, then the distributed dynamo model with anisotropic diffusivity satisfies the observational constraints from heloseismology results and is consistent with the value of effective turbulent diffusion, estimated from the dynamics of surface magnetic fields.
  • Recent findings of helioseismology as well as advances in direct numerical simulations of global dynamics of the Sun have indicated that in each solar hemisphere the meridional circulation forms the two cells along the in the convection zone. We investigate properties of a mean-field solar dynamo with such double-cell meridional circulation. The dynamo model also includes the realistic profile of solar differential rotation (including the tachocline and subsurface shear layer), and takes into account effects of turbulent pumping, anisotropic turbulent diffusivity, and conservation of magnetic helicity. Contrary to previous flux-transport dynamo models, it is found that the dynamo model can robustly reproduce the basic properties of the solar magnetic cycles for a wide range of model parameters and the circulation speed. The best agreement with observations is achieved when the surface speed of meridional circulation is about 12 m/s. For this circulation speed the simulated sunspot activity shows good synchronization with the polar magnetic fields. Such synchronization was indeed observed during the past sunspot cycles 21 and 22. We compare theoretical and observed phase diagrams of the sunspot number and the polar field strength and discuss the peculiar properties of Cycle 23.
  • Turbulent properties of the quiet Sun represent the basic state of surface conditions, and a background for various processes of solar activity. Therefore understanding of properties and dynamics of this `basic' state is important for investigation of more complex phenomena, formation and development of observed phenomena in the photosphere and atmosphere. For characterization of the turbulent properties we compare kinetic energy spectra on granular and sub-granular scales obtained from infrared TiO observations with the New Solar Telescope (Big Bear Solar Observatory) and from 3D radiative MHD numerical simulations ('SolarBox' code). We find that the numerical simulations require a high spatial resolution with 10 - 25 km grid-step in order to reproduce the inertial (Kolmogorov) turbulence range. The observational data require an averaging procedure to remove noise and potential instrumental artifacts. The resulting kinetic energy spectra show a good agreement between the simulations and observations, opening new perspectives for detailed joint analysis of more complex turbulent phenomena on the Sun, and possibly on other stars. In addition, using the simulations and observations we investigate effects of background magnetic field, which is concentrated in self-organized complicated structures in intergranular lanes, and find an increase of the small-scale turbulence energy and its decrease at larger scales due to magnetic field effects.
  • We use 3D radiative MHD simulations to investigate the formation and dynamics of small-scale (less than 0.5 Mm in diameter) vortex tubes spontaneously generated by turbulent convection in quiet-Sun regions with initially weak mean magnetic fields. The results show that the vortex tubes penetrate into the chromosphere and substantially affect the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. The vortex tubes are mostly concentrated in intergranular lanes and are characterized by strong (near sonic) downflows and swirling motions that capture and twist magnetic field lines, forming magnetic flux tubes that expand with height and which attain magnetic field strengths ranging from 200 G in the chromosphere to more than 1 kG in the photosphere. We investigate in detail the physical properties of these vortex tubes, including thermodynamic properties, flow dynamics, and kinetic and current helicities, and conclude that magnetized vortex tubes provide an important path for energy and momentum transfer from the convection zone into the chromosphere.
  • We study the dynamical and statistical properties of turbulent cross-helicity (correlation of the aligned fluctuating velocity and magnetic field components). We derive an equation governing generation and evolution of the turbulent cross-helicity and discuss its meaning for the dynamo. Using symmetry properties of the problem we suggest a general expression for the turbulent cross-helicity pseudo-scalar and compute the turbulent coefficients in this expression. Effects of the density stratification, large-scale magnetic fields, differential rotation and turbulent convection are taken into account. We investigate the relative contribution of these effects to the cross-helicity evolution for two kinds of dynamo models of the solar cycle including a distributed mean-field model and a flux-transport dynamo model. We show that the contribution from the density stratification follows the evolution of the radial magnetic field, while large-scale electric currents produce a more complicated pattern of the cross-helicity of the comparable magnitude. We suggest that the results of observational analysis of the cross-helicity will depend on the averaging scales. Our results show that the pattern of the cross-helicity evolution strongly depends on details of the dynamo mechanism. Thus, we anticipate that direct observations of the cross-helicity on the Sun may serve for the diagnostic purpose of the solar dynamo process.
  • The paper presents a study of a solar dynamo model operating in the bulk of the convection zone with the toroidal magnetic field flux concentrated in the subsurface rotational shear layer. We explore how this type of dynamo may depend on spatial variations of turbulent parameters and on the differential rotation near the surface. The mean-field dynamo model takes into account the evolution of magnetic helicity and describes its nonlinear feedback on the generation of large-scale magnetic field by the $\alpha$-effect. We compare the magnetic cycle characteristics predicted by the model, including the cycle asymmetry (associated with the growth and decay times) and the duration - amplitude relation (Waldmeier's effects), with the observed sunspot cycle properties. We show that the model qualitatively reproduces the basic properties of the solar cycles.
  • The paper presents a study of kinematic axisymmetric mean-field dynamo models for a case of the meridional circulation with a deep-seated stagnation point and a strong return flow at the bottom of the convection zone. This kind of circulation follows from mean-field models of the angular momentum balance in the solar convection zone. We show that it is possible for this types of meridional circulation to construct kinematic dynamo models that resemble in some aspects the sunspot magnetic activity cycle. The dynamo model includes turbulent sources of the large-scale poloidal magnetic field production, due to kinetic helicity and a combined effect due to Coriolis force and the large-scale current. In these models the toroidal magnetic field, which is responsible for the sunspot production, is concentrated at the bottom of the convection zone, and is transported to low-latitude regions by the meridional flow. The meridional component of the poloidal field is also concentrated at the bottom of the convection zone while the radial component is concentrated in near polar regions. There are some issues which, perhaps, are resulted from the given meridional circulation pattern and the distribution of the magnetic diffusivity inside convection zone. In particular, in the near-equatorial regions the phase relations between the toroidal and poloidal components disagree with observations. Also, we show that the period of the magnetic cycle may not always monotonically decrease with the increase of the meridional flow speed. Thus, for the further progress it is important to determine the structure of the meridional circulation, which is one of the critical properties, from helioseismology observations.
  • The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/HMI) provides continuous full-disk observations of solar oscillations. We develop a data-analysis pipeline based on the time-distance helioseismology method to measure acoustic travel times using HMI Doppler-shift observations, and infer solar interior properties by inverting these measurements. The pipeline is used for routine production of near-real-time full-disk maps of subsurface wave-speed perturbations and horizontal flow velocities for depths ranging from 0 to 20 Mm, every eight hours. In addition, Carrington synoptic maps for the subsurface properties are made from these full-disk maps. The pipeline can also be used for selected target areas and time periods. We explain details of the pipeline organization and procedures, including processing of the HMI Doppler observations, measurements of the travel times, inversions, and constructions of the full-disk and synoptic maps. Some initial results from the pipeline, including full-disk flow maps, sunspot subsurface flow fields, and the interior rotation and meridional flow speeds, are presented.
  • Rotation of the leading sunspot of active region NOAA 10421 was investigated using magnetograms and Dopplergrams from the MDI instrument of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and white-light images from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). The vertical, radial, and azimuthal axisymmetrical components of both magnetic and velocity field vectors were reconstructed for the sunspot umbra and penumbra. All three components of both vectors in the umbra and penumbra show torsional oscillations with the same rotational period of about 3.8 days. The TRACE white-light data also show that the sunspot umbra and penumbra are torsionally rotating with the same period. Possible mechanisms of sunspot torsional motions are discussed.
  • The X2.2-class solar flare of February 15, 2011, produced a powerful `sunquake' event, representing a seismic response to the flare impact. The impulsively excited seismic waves formed a compact wavepacket traveling through the solar interior and appeared on the surface as expanding wave ripples. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), instrument on SDO, observes variations of intensity, magnetic field and plasma velocity (Dopplergrams) on the surface of Sun almost uninterruptedly with high resolution (0.5 arcsec/pixel) and high cadence (45 sec). The flare impact on the solar surface was observed in the form of compact and rapid variations of the HMI observables (Doppler velocity, line-of-sight magnetic field and continuum intensity). These variations, caused by the impact of high-energy particles in the photosphere, formed a typical two-ribbon flare structure. The sunquake can be easily seen in the raw Dopplergram differences without any special data processing. The source of this quake was located near the outer boundary of a very complicated complicated sunspot region, NOAA 1158, in a sunspot penumbra and at the penumbra boundary. This caused an interesting plasma dynamics in the impact region. I present some preliminary results of analysis of the near-real-time data from HMI, and discuss properties of the sunquake and the flare impact sources.
  • Sunspot regions often form complexes of activity that may live for several solar rotations, and represent a major component of the Sun's magnetic activity. It had been suggested that the close appearance of active regions in space and time might be related to common subsurface roots, or "nests" of activity. EUV images show that the active regions are magnetically connected in the corona, but subsurface connections have not been established. We investigate the subsurface structure and dynamics of a large complex of activity, NOAA 10987-10989, observed during the SOHO/MDI Dynamics run in March-April 2008, which was a part of the Whole Heliospheric Interval (WHI) campaign. The active regions in this complex appeared in a narrow latitudinal range, probably representing a subsurface toroidal flux tube. We use the MDI full-disk Dopplergrams to measure perturbations of travel times of acoustic waves traveling to various depths by using time-distance helioseismology, and obtain sound-speed and flow maps by inversion of the travel times. The subsurface flow maps show an interesting dynamics of decaying active regions with persistent shearing flows, which may be important for driving the flaring and CME activity, observed during the WHI campaign. Our analysis, including the seismic sound-speed inversion results and the distribution of deep-focus travel-time anomalies, gave indications of diverging roots of the magnetic structures, as could be expected from $\Omega$-loop structures. However, no clear connection in the depth range of 0-48 Mm among the three active regions in this complex of activity was detected.
  • In this study we investigate the effects of turbulent convection on formation of large-scale inhomogeneous magnetic structures by means of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) for convection in solar-type stars. The main idea of this study is the implementation of a new subgrid-scale model for the effective Lorentz force in a three-dimensional nonlinear radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code developed for simulating the upper solar convection zone and lower atmosphere. To this end we derived the energy budget equations, which include the effects of the subgrid-scale turbulence on the Lorentz-force, and implemented the new subgrid-scale turbulence model (TELF-Model) in a three-dimensional nonlinear MHD LES code. Using imposed initial vertical and horizontal uniform magnetic fields in LES with the TELF-Model, we have shown that the magnetic flux tubes formation is started when the initial mean magnetic field is larger than a threshold value (about 100 G). This is in agreement with the theoretical studies by Rogachevskii and Kleeorin (2007). We have determined the vertical profiles of the velocity and magnetic fluctuations, total MHD energy and anisotropy of turbulent magneto-convection, kinetic and current and cross helicities.
  • We report the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of convection-driven dynamos in relatively thin rotating spherical shells that show a transition from an strong non-oscillatory dipolar magnetic field to a weaker regularly oscillating dipolar field. The transition is induced primarily by the effects a stress-free boundary condition. The variation of the inner to outer radius ratio is found to have a less important effect.
  • We propose a solar dynamo model distributed in the bulk of the convection zone with the toroidal magnetic field the flux concentrated in the near-surface layer. We show that if the boundary conditions at the top of the dynamo region allow the large-scale toroidal magnetic fields to penetrate closer to the surface, then the pattern of the modeled butterfly diagram for the toroidal magnetic fields in the upper part of the convection zone is formed by the surface rotational shear layer. The model is in agreement with observed properties of the magnetic solar cycle.