• We present the first limits on the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) 21-cm HI power spectra, in the redshift range $z=7.9-10.6$, using the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) High-Band Antenna (HBA). In total 13\,h of data were used from observations centred on the North Celestial Pole (NCP). After subtraction of the sky model and the noise bias, we detect a non-zero $\Delta^2_{\rm I} = (56 \pm 13 {\rm mK})^2$ (1-$\sigma$) excess variance and a best 2-$\sigma$ upper limit of $\Delta^2_{\rm 21} < (79.6 {\rm mK})^2$ at $k=0.053$$h$cMpc$^{-1}$ in the range $z=$9.6-10.6. The excess variance decreases when optimizing the smoothness of the direction- and frequency-dependent gain calibration, and with increasing the completeness of the sky model. It is likely caused by (i) residual side-lobe noise on calibration baselines, (ii) leverage due to non-linear effects, (iii) noise and ionosphere-induced gain errors, or a combination thereof. Further analyses of the excess variance will be discussed in forthcoming publications.
  • The new generation of low-frequency radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR: a Square Kilometre Array-low pathfinder), provides advancements in our capability of probing Galactic magnetism through low-frequency polarimetry. Maps of diffuse polarized radio emission and Faraday rotation can be used to infer properties of, and trace structure in, the magnetic fields in the ISM. However, to date very little of the sky has been probed at high angular and Faraday depth resolution. We observed a 5x5 degree region centred on the nearby galaxy IC342 using LOFAR in the frequency range 115-178 MHz at 4 arcmin resolution and performed Faraday tomography to detect foreground Galactic polarized synchrotron emission separated by Faraday depth (different amounts of Faraday rotation). Our Faraday depth cube shows rich polarized structure, with up to 30 K of polarized emission at 150 MHz. We detect two overlapping diffuse polarized features that are clearly separated in Faraday depth. Faraday-thick structures at such low frequencies would be too strongly depolarized to explain the observations and are therefore rejected. Only Faraday thin structures will not be strongly depolarized; producing such structures requires localized variations in the ratio of synchrotron emissivity to Faraday depth per unit distance, which can arise from several physical phenomena, such as a transition between regions of ionized and neutral gas. We conclude that the observed polarized emission is Faraday thin, and propose that the emission originates from two neutral clouds in the local ISM. We have modeled the Faraday rotation for this line of sight and estimated that the line of sight component of magnetic field of the local ISM for this direction varies between -0.86 and +0.12 uG. We propose that this may be a useful method for mapping magnetic fields within the local ISM.
  • LOFAR is the LOw Frequency Radio interferometer ARray located at mid-latitude ($52^{\circ} 53'N$). Here, we present results on ionospheric structures derived from 29 LOFAR nighttime observations during the winters of 2012/2013 and 2013/2014. We show that LOFAR is able to determine differential ionospheric TEC values with an accuracy better than 1 mTECU over distances ranging between 1 and 100 km. For all observations the power law behavior of the phase structure function is confirmed over a long range of baseline lengths, between $1$ and $80$ km, with a slope that is in general larger than the $5/3$ expected for pure Kolmogorov turbulence. The measured average slope is $1.89$ with a one standard deviation spread of $0.1$. The diffractive scale, i.e. the length scale where the phase variance is $1\, \mathrm{rad^2}$, is shown to be an easily obtained single number that represents the ionospheric quality of a radio interferometric observation. A small diffractive scale is equivalent to high phase variability over the field of view as well as a short time coherence of the signal, which limits calibration and imaging quality. For the studied observations the diffractive scales at $150$ MHz vary between $3.5$ and $30\,$ km. A diffractive scale above $5$ km, pertinent to about $90 \%$ of the observations, is considered sufficient for the high dynamic range imaging needed for the LOFAR Epoch of Reionization project. For most nights the ionospheric irregularities were anisotropic, with the structures being aligned with the Earth magnetic field in about $60\%$ of the observations.
  • G.H. Heald, R.F. Pizzo, E. Orrú, R.P. Breton, D. Carbone, C. Ferrari, M.J. Hardcastle, W. Jurusik, G. Macario, D. Mulcahy, D. Rafferty, A. Asgekar, M. Brentjens, R.A. Fallows, W. Frieswijk, M.C. Toribio, B. Adebahr, M. Arts, M.R. Bell, A. Bonafede, J. Bray, J. Broderick, T. Cantwell, P. Carroll, Y. Cendes, A.O. Clarke, J. Croston, S. Daiboo, F. de Gasperin, J. Gregson, J. Harwood, T. Hassall, V. Heesen, A. Horneffer, A.J. van der Horst, M. Iacobelli, V. Jelić, D. Jones, D. Kant, G. Kokotanekov, P. Martin, J.P. McKean, L.K. Morabito, B. Nikiel-Wroczyński, A. Offringa, V.N. Pandey, M. Pandey-Pommier, M. Pietka, L. Pratley, C. Riseley, A. Rowlinson, J. Sabater, A.M.M. Scaife, L.H.A. Scheers, K. Sendlinger, A. Shulevski, M. Sipior, C. Sobey, A.J. Stewart, A. Stroe, J. Swinbank, C. Tasse, J. Trüstedt, E. Varenius, S. van Velzen, N. Vilchez, R.J. van Weeren, S. Wijnholds, W.L. Williams, A.G. de Bruyn, R. Nijboer, M. Wise, A. Alexov, J. Anderson, I.M. Avruch, R. Beck, M.E. Bell, I. van Bemmel, M.J. Bentum, G. Bernardi, P. Best, F. Breitling, W.N. Brouw, M. Brüggen, H.R. Butcher, B. Ciardi, J.E. Conway, E. de Geus, A. de Jong, M. de Vos, A. Deller, R.J. Dettmar, S. Duscha, J. Eislöffel, D. Engels, H. Falcke, R. Fender, M.A. Garrett, J. Grießmeier, A.W. Gunst, J.P. Hamaker, J.W.T. Hessels, M. Hoeft, J. Hörandel, H.A. Holties, H. Intema, N.J. Jackson, E. Jütte, A. Karastergiou, W.F.A. Klijn, V.I. Kondratiev, L.V.E. Koopmans, M. Kuniyoshi, G. Kuper, C. Law, J. van Leeuwen, M. Loose, P. Maat, S. Markoff, R. McFadden, D. McKay-Bukowski, M. Mevius, J.C.A. Miller-Jones, R. Morganti, H. Munk, A. Nelles, J.E. Noordam, M.J. Norden, H. Paas, A.G. Polatidis, W. Reich, A. Renting, H. Röttgering, A. Schoenmakers, D. Schwarz, J. Sluman, O. Smirnov, B.W. Stappers, M. Steinmetz, M. Tagger, Y. Tang, S. ter Veen, S. Thoudam, R. Vermeulen, C. Vocks, C. Vogt, R.A.M.J. Wijers, O. Wucknitz, S. Yatawatta, P. Zarka
    Sept. 3, 2015 astro-ph.IM
    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky LOFAR imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic multifrequency nature providing information about the spectral properties of the detected sources over more than two octaves (from 30 to 160 MHz). The broadband frequency coverage, together with the fast survey speed generated by LOFAR's multibeaming capabilities, make MSSS the first survey of the sort anticipated to be carried out with the forthcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Two of the sixteen frequency bands included in the survey were chosen to exactly overlap the frequency coverage of large-area Very Large Array (VLA) and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) surveys at 74 MHz and 151 MHz respectively. The survey performance is illustrated within the "MSSS Verification Field" (MVF), a region of 100 square degrees centered at J2000 (RA,Dec)=(15h,69deg). The MSSS results from the MVF are compared with previous radio survey catalogs. We assess the flux and astrometric uncertainties in the catalog, as well as the completeness and reliability considering our source finding strategy. We determine the 90% completeness levels within the MVF to be 100 mJy at 135 MHz with 108" resolution, and 550 mJy at 50 MHz with 166" resolution. Images and catalogs for the full survey, expected to contain 150,000-200,000 sources, will be released to a public web server. We outline the plans for the ongoing production of the final survey products, and the ultimate public release of images and source catalogs.
  • GRB 130427A was extremely bright as a result of occurring at low redshift whilst the energetics were more typical of high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We collected well-sampled light curves at 1.4 and 4.8 GHz of GRB 130427A with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT); and we obtained its most accurate position with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (EVN). Our flux density measurements are combined with all the data available at radio, optical and X-ray frequencies to perform broadband modeling in the framework of a reverse-forward shock model and a two-component jet model, and we discuss the implications and limitations of both models. The low density inferred from the modeling implies that the GRB 130427A progenitor is either a very low-metallicity Wolf-Rayet star, or a rapidly rotating, low-metallicity O star. We also find that the fraction of the energy in electrons is evolving over time, and that the fraction of electrons participating in a relativistic power-law energy distribution is less than 15%. We observed intraday variability during the earliest WSRT observations, and the source sizes inferred from our modeling are consistent with this variability being due to interstellar scintillation effects. Finally, we present and discuss our limits on the linear and circular polarization, which are among the deepest limits of GRB radio polarization to date.
  • We examine the long-term evolution of the intra-hour variable quasar, J1819+3845, whose variations have been attributed to interstellar scintillation by extremely local turbulent plasma, located only 1-3pc from Earth. The variations in this source ceased some time between June 2006 and February 2007. The evolution of the source spectrum and the long-term lightcurve, and the persistent compactness of the source VLBI structure indicates that the cessation of rapid variability was associated with the passage of the scattering material out of the line of sight to the quasar. We present an analysis of the linear polarization variations and their relation to total intensity variations. The proper motion of polarized features in the quasar jet is found to be subluminal. Systematic time delays between Stokes I, Q and U, in combination with the structure of the source obtained from 8.4GHz VLBI data, confirm the estimate of the screen distance: 1-2pc, making the screen one of the nearest objects to the Solar System. We determine the physical properties of this scattering material. The electron density in the scattering region is extremely high with respect to the warm ionized ISM, with an estimated density of $n_e \sim 97 \, l_0^{1/3} {\Delta L}_{100}^{-1/2}$cm$^{-3}$, where $l_0$ is the outer scale of the turbulence in AU and $\Delta L = 100 \Delta L_{100}$ AU is the depth of the scattering region. If this plasma is in pressure balance with the local magnetic field, one expects a ~2 rad/m^2 rotation measure change associated with the passage of this material past the quasar. We examine the rotation measures of sources and the diffuse polarized emission in the surrounding region. We place a limit of 10 rad/m^2 on the RM change. The variability of sources near J1819+3845 is used to deduce that the screen must therefore be either very small (~100 AU) or patchy.
  • This work investigates a particular class of artefacts, or ghost sources, in radio interferometric images. Earlier observations with (and simulations of) the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) suggested that these were due to calibration with incomplete sky models. A theoretical framework is derived that validates this suggestion, and provides predictions of ghost formation in a two-source scenario. The predictions are found to accurately match the result of simulations, and qualitatively reproduce the ghosts previously seen in observational data. The theory also provides explanations for many previously puzzling features of these artefacts (regular geometry, PSF-like sidelobes, seeming independence on model flux), and shows that the observed phenomenon of flux suppression affecting unmodelled sources is due to the same mechanism. We demonstrate that this ghost formation mechanism is a fundamental feature of calibration, and exhibits a particularly strong and localized signature due to array redundancy. To some extent this mechanism will affect all observations (including those with non-redundant arrays), though in most cases the ghosts remain hidden below the noise or masked by other instrumental artefacts. The implications of such errors on future deep observations are discussed.
  • This document describes the general astronomical capabilities of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). The frequency range covered by LOFAR is split into two bands denoted as low band (LB, 10 - 80 MHz) and high band (HB, 120 - 240 MHz). LOFAR stations are spread over a 100 km sized region in the northern part of the Netherlands. In addition to the Dutch stations there will be European stations providing baselines between 200 km and 1000 km. Most of the results in this document, however, are limited to the Dutch array. In section 2 the LBA and HBA station configurations are reviewed. Section 3 reviews the imaging capabilities as station Full Width Half Maximum, station Field of View, and array resolution. In section 4 the system sensitivity is considered and thermal noise levels in LOFAR images are given. Finally, in section 5 some cautionary notes are collected. We advise you to read these notes carefully before using the numbers that are presented in this report.
  • The redshifted 21 cm brightness distribution from neutral hydrogen is a promising probe into the cosmic dark ages, cosmic dawn, and re-ionization. LOFAR's Low Band Antennas (LBA) may be used in the frequency range 45 MHz to 85 MHz (30>z>16) to measure the sky averaged redshifted 21 cm brightness temperature as a function of frequency, or equivalently, cosmic redshift. These low frequencies are affected by strong Galactic foreground emission that is observed through frequency dependent ionospheric and antenna beam distortions which lead to chromatic mixing of spatial structure into spectral structure. Using simple models, we show that (i) the additional antenna temperature due to ionospheric refraction and absorption are at a \sim 1% level--- 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the expected 21 cm signal, and have an approximate \nu^{-2} dependence, (ii) ionospheric refraction leads to a knee-like modulation on the sky spectrum at \nu\approx 4\times plasma frequency. Using more realistic simulations, we show that in the measured sky spectrum, more than 50% of the 21 cm signal variance can be lost to confusion from foregrounds and chromatic effects. We conclude that foregrounds and chromatic mixing may not be subtracted as generic functions of frequency as previously thought, but must rather be carefully modeled using additional priors and interferometric measurements.
  • Direction-dependent effects (DDEs) represent a major challenge both for calibration of new radio telescopes, and for advancing the state of the art of existing ones. Various approaches to the problem are currently in development. This paper describes several WSRT observations where a pointing error -- commonly thought to be a major contributor to DDEs at higher frequencies -- was deliberately introduced. These observations were reduced using the MeqTrees package, using two different approaches to correct for DDEs: differential gain solutions, and a direct solution for pointing errors. The results of this are analysed and compared.
  • The aim of the new generation of radio synthesis arrays such as LOFAR and SKA is to achieve much higher sensitivity, resolution and frequency coverage than what is available now, especially at low frequencies. To accomplish this goal, the accuracy of the calibration techniques used is of considerable importance. Moreover, since these telescopes produce huge amounts of data, speed of convergence of calibration is a major bottleneck. The errors in calibration are due to system noise (sky and instrumental) as well as the estimation errors introduced by the calibration technique itself, which we call solver noise. We define solver noise as the distance between the optimal solution (the true value of the unknowns, uncorrupted by the system noise) and the solution obtained by calibration. We present the Space Alternating Generalized Expectation Maximization (SAGE) calibration technique, which is a modification of the Expectation Maximization algorithm, and compare its performance with the traditional Least Squares calibration based on the level of solver noise introduced by each technique. For this purpose, we develop statistical methods that use the calibrated solutions to estimate the level of solver noise. The SAGE calibration algorithm yields very promising results both in terms of accuracy and speed of convergence. The comparison approaches we adopt introduce a new framework for assessing the performance of different calibration schemes.
  • In the coming years a new insight into galaxy formation and the thermal history of the Universe is expected to come from the detection of the highly redshifted cosmological 21 cm line. The cosmological 21 cm line signal is buried under Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds which are likely to be a few orders of magnitude brighter. Strategies and techniques for effective subtraction of these foreground sources require a detailed knowledge of their structure in both intensity and polarization on the relevant angular scales of 1-30 arcmin. We present results from observations conducted with the Westerbork telescope in the 140-160 MHz range with 2 arcmin resolution in two fields located at intermediate Galactic latitude, centred around the bright quasar 3C196 and the North Celestial Pole. They were observed with the purpose of characterizing the foreground properties in sky areas where actual observations of the cosmological 21 cm line could be carried out. The polarization data were analysed through the rotation measure synthesis technique. We have computed total intensity and polarization angular power spectra. Total intensity maps were carefully calibrated, reaching a high dynamic range, 150000:1 in the case of the 3C196 field. [abridged]
  • Radio astronomy is entering a new era with new and future radio observatories such as the Low Frequency Array and the Square Kilometer Array. We describe in detail an automated flagging pipeline and evaluate its performance. With only a fraction of the computational cost of correlation and its use of the previously introduced SumThreshold method, it is found to be both fast and unrivalled in its high accuracy. The LOFAR radio environment is analysed with the help of this pipeline. The high time and spectral resolution of LOFAR have resulted in an observatory where only a few percent of the data is lost due to RFI.
  • Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath the Moon's surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequency window for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHE neutrino flux. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a sampling frequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth's ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, the detection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit on the UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.
  • We describe and compare several post-correlation radio frequency interference classification methods. As data sizes of observations grow with new and improved telescopes, the need for completely automated, robust methods for radio frequency interference mitigation is pressing. We investigated several classification methods and find that, for the data sets we used, the most accurate among them is the SumThreshold method. This is a new method formed from a combination of existing techniques, including a new way of thresholding. This iterative method estimates the astronomical signal by carrying out a surface fit in the time-frequency plane. With a theoretical accuracy of 95% recognition and an approximately 0.1% false probability rate in simple simulated cases, the method is in practice as good as the human eye in finding RFI. In addition it is fast, robust, does not need a data model before it can be executed and works in almost all configurations with its default parameters. The method has been compared using simulated data with several other mitigation techniques, including one based upon the singular value decomposition of the time-frequency matrix, and has shown better results than the rest.
  • Particle cascades initiated by ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos in the lunar regolith will emit an electromagnetic pulse with a time duration of the order of nano seconds through a process known as the Askaryan effect. It has been shown that in an observing window around 150 MHz there is a maximum chance for detecting this radiation with radio telescopes commonly used in astronomy. In 50 hours of observation time with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we have set a new limit on the flux of neutrinos, summed over all flavors, with energies in excess of $4\times10^{22}$ eV.
  • Spectral index studies of halos, relics, and radio galaxies provide useful information on their origin and connection with merger processes. We present WSRT multi-wavelength observations of the galaxy cluster Abell 2255 at 25 cm, 85 cm, and 2 m. The spectral index images allowed us to study the integrated spectrum of halo and relic and to investigate the physical properties of the Beaver head-tail radio galaxy belonging to the cluster. In the radio halo, the spectral index is steeper at the center and flatter at the locations of the radio filaments, clearly detected at 25 cm. In the relics, the spectral index flattens, moving away from the cluster center. For the Beaver radio galaxy, the spectrum severely steepens from the head towards the end of the tail, because of the energy losses suffered by the relativistic particles. In the 2 m map, which is the first high-sensitivity image presented in the literature at such a long wavelength, a new Mpc-size emission region is detected between the known radio halo and the NW relic. Not detecting this feature in the more sensitive 85 cm observations implies that it must have a very steep spectrum (alpha <= -2.6). The observational properties of the radio halo suggest that either we are looking at a superposition of different structures (filaments in the foreground plus real halo in the background) seen in projection across the cluster center or that the halo is intrinsically peculiar. The newly detected extended region to the NW of the halo could be considered as an asymmetric extension of the halo itself. However, since radio halos are known in the literature as structures showing a regular morphology, the new feature could represent the first example of steep Mpc-size diffuse structures (MDS), detected around clusters at very low frequencies.
  • We present the first results from a series of observations conducted with the Westerbork telescope in the 140--160 MHz range with a 2 arcmin resolution aimed at characterizing the properties of the foregrounds for epoch of reionization experiments. For the first time we have detected fluctuations in the Galactic diffuse emission on scales greater than 13 arcmin at 150 MHz, in the low Galactic latitude area known as Fan region. Those fluctuations have an $rms$ of 14 K. The total intensity power spectrum shows a power--law behaviour down to $\ell \sim 900$ with slope $\beta^I_\ell = -2.2 \pm 0.3$. The detection of diffuse emission at smaller angular scales is limited by residual point sources. We measured an $rms$ confusion noise of $\sim$3 mJy beam$^{-1}$. Diffuse polarized emission was also detected for the first time at this frequency. The polarized signal shows complex structure both spatially and along the line of sight. The polarization power spectrum shows a power--law behaviour down to $\ell \sim 2700$ with slope $\beta^P_\ell = -1.65 \pm 0.15$. The $rms$ of polarization fluctuations is 7.2 K on 4 arcmin scales. By extrapolating the measured spectrum of total intensity emission, we find a contamination on the cosmological signal of $\delta T= \sqrt{\ell (\ell+1) C^I_\ell / 2\pi} \sim 5.7$ K on 5 arcmin scales and a corresponding $rms$ value of $\sim$18.3 K at the same angular scale. The level of the polarization power spectrum is $\delta T \sim 3.3$ K on 5 arcmin scales. Given its exceptionally bright polarized signal, the Fan region is likely to represent an upper limit on the sky brightness at moderate and high Galactic latitude.
  • We investigate the properties of the Galactic ISM by applying Faraday tomography to a radio polarization data set in the direction of the Galactic anti-centre. We address the problem of missing large-scale structure in our data, and show that this does not play an important role for the results we present. The main peak of the Faraday depth spectra in our data set is not measurably resolved for about 8% of the lines of sight. An unresolved peak indicates a separation between the regions with Faraday rotation and synchrotron emission. However, cosmic rays pervade the ISM, and synchrotron emission would therefore also be produced where there is Faraday rotation. We suggest that the orientation of the magnetic field can separate the two effects. By modelling the thermal electron contribution to the Faraday depth, we map the strength of the magnetic field component along the line of sight. Polarized point sources in our data set have rotation measures that are comparable to the Faraday depths of the diffuse emission in our data. Our Faraday depth maps show narrow canals of low polarized intensity. We conclude that depolarization over the telescope beam produces at least some of these canals. Finally, we investigate the properties of one conspicuous region in this data set and argue that it is created by a decrease in line-of-sight depolarization compared to its surroundings.
  • We show that at wavelengths comparable to the length of the shower produced by an Ultra-High Energy cosmic ray or neutrino, radio signals are an extremely efficient way to detect these particles. First results are presented of an analysis of 20 hours of observation data for NuMoon project using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope to search for short radio pulses from the Moon. A limit on the neutrino flux is set that is a factor four better than the current one (based on FORTE).
  • We present an efficient method to generate large simulations of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) without the need for a full 3-dimensional radiative transfer code. Large dark-matter-only simulations are post-processed to produce maps of the redshifted 21cm emission from neutral hydrogen. Dark matter haloes are embedded with sources of radiation whose properties are either based on semi-analytical prescriptions or derived from hydrodynamical simulations. These sources could either be stars or power-law sources with varying spectral indices. Assuming spherical symmetry, ionized bubbles are created around these sources, whose radial ionized fraction and temperature profiles are derived from a catalogue of 1-D radiative transfer experiments. In case of overlap of these spheres, photons are conserved by redistributing them around the connected ionized regions corresponding to the spheres. The efficiency with which these maps are created allows us to span the large parameter space typically encountered in reionization simulations. We compare our results with other, more accurate, 3-D radiative transfer simulations and find excellent agreement for the redshifts and the spatial scales of interest to upcoming 21cm experiments. We generate a contiguous observational cube spanning redshift 6 to 12 and use these simulations to study the differences in the reionization histories between stars and quasars. Finally, the signal is convolved with the LOFAR beam response and its effects are analyzed and quantified. Statistics performed on this mock data set shed light on possible observational strategies for LOFAR.
  • Low-frequency radio observations of galaxy clusters are the key to detecting the diffuse extended emission associated with them. The presence and properties of such radio sources in galaxy clusters reveal the existence of magnetic fields on a large scale and allow theories to be tested concerning both the origin of relativistic particles in the ICM and their propagation. A deep radio bservation of the A2255 galaxy cluster was carried out at 85 cm with the WSRT. The good UV-coverage and sensitivity achieved by these observations allowed us to image the complex structure of the low-brightness, extended cluster sources (radio halo and relic). These sources show a larger extent than what has been imaged so far at this frequency, with two new structures located SW and NW of the cluster center and at projected distances of 2 Mpc from it. The physical properties of the newly detected structures, together with the active dynamical state of the cluster, support a connection with large-scale structure (LSS) formation shocks.
  • We present Very Large Array images of a "Double-Double Radio Galaxy", a class of objects in which two pairs of lobes are aligned either side of the nucleus. In this object, B0925+420, we discover a third pair of lobes, close to the core and again in alignment with the other lobes. This first-known "Triple-Double" object strongly increases the likelihood that these lobes represent mutiple episodes of jet activity, as opposed to knots in an underlying jet. We model the lobes in terms of their dynamical evolution. We find that the inner pair of lobes is consistent with the outer pair having been displaced buoyantly by the ambient medium. The middle pair of lobes is more problematic - to the extent where an alternative model interpreting the middle and inner "lobes" as additional bow shocks within the outer lobes may be more appropriate - and we discuss the implications of this on our understanding of the density of the ambient medium.
  • We investigate the distribution and properties of Faraday rotating and synchrotron emitting regions in the Galactic ISM in the direction of the Galactic anti-centre. We apply Faraday tomography to a radio polarization dataset that we obtained with the WSRT. We developed a new method to calculate a linear fit to periodic data, which we use to determine rotation measures from our polarization angle data. From simulations of a Faraday screen + noise we could determine how compatible the data are with Faraday screens. An unexpectedly large fraction of 14% of the lines-of-sight in our dataset show an unresolved main component in the Faraday depth spectrum. For lines-of-sight with a single unresolved component we demonstrate that a Faraday screen in front of a synchrotron emitting region that contains a turbulent magnetic field component can explain the data.
  • LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a next-generation radio telescope that is being built in Northern Europe and expected to be fully operational at the end of this decade. It will operate at frequencies from 15 to 240 MHz (corresponding to wavelengths of 20 to 1.2 m). Its superb sensitivity, high angular resolution, large field of view and flexible spectroscopic capabilities will represent a dramatic improvement over previous facilities at these wavelengths. As such, LOFAR will carry out a broad range of fundamental astrophysical studies. The design of LOFAR has been driven by four fundamental astrophysical applications: (i) The Epoch of Reionisation, (ii) Extragalactic Surveys and their exploitation to study the formation and evolution of clusters, galaxies and black holes, (iii) Transient Sources and their association with high energy objects such as gamma ray bursts, and (iv) Cosmic Ray showers and their exploitation to study the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. In this conference the foreseen LOFAR work on the epoch of reionisation has been covered by de Bruyn and on cosmic ray showers by Falcke. During this contribution we will first present the LOFAR project with an emphasis on the challenges faced when carrying out sensitive imaging at low radio frequencies. Subsequently, we will discuss LOFAR's capabilities to survey the low-frequency radio sky. Main aims for the planned surveys are studies of z>6 radio galaxies, diffuse emission associated with distant clusters and starbursting galaxies at z>2.