• In this work we present spectra of all $\gamma$-ray burst (GRB) afterglows that have been promptly observed with the X-shooter spectrograph until 31-03-2017. In total, we obtained spectroscopic observations of 103 individual GRBs observed within 48 hours of the GRB trigger. Redshifts have been measured for 97 per cent of these, covering a redshift range from 0.059 to 7.84. Based on a set of observational selection criteria that minimize biases with regards to intrinsic properties of the GRBs, the follow-up effort has been focused on producing a homogeneous sample of 93 afterglow spectra for GRBs discovered by the Swift satellite. We here provide a public release of all the reduced spectra, including continuum estimates and telluric absorption corrections. For completeness, we also provide reductions for the 18 late-time observations of the underlying host galaxies. We provide an assessment of the degree of completeness with respect to the parent GRB population, in terms of the X-ray properties of the bursts in the sample and find that the sample presented here is representative of the full Swift sample. We constrain the fraction of dark bursts to be < 28 per cent and we confirm previous results that higher optical darkness is correlated with increased X-ray absorption. For the 42 bursts for which it is possible, we provide a measurement of the neutral hydrogen column density, increasing the total number of published HI column density measurements by $\sim$ 33 per cent. This dataset provides a unique resource to study the ISM across cosmic time, from the local progenitor surroundings to the intervening universe.
  • With the first direct detection of merging black holes in 2015, the era of gravitational wave (GW) astrophysics began. A complete picture of compact object mergers, however, requires the detection of an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. We report ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray observations by Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) of the EM counterpart of the binary neutron star merger GW170817. The bright, rapidly fading ultraviolet emission indicates a high mass ($\approx0.03$ solar masses) wind-driven outflow with moderate electron fraction ($Y_{e}\approx0.27$). Combined with the X-ray limits, we favor an observer viewing angle of $\approx 30^{\circ}$ away from the orbital rotation axis, which avoids both obscuration from the heaviest elements in the orbital plane and a direct view of any ultra-relativistic, highly collimated ejecta (a gamma-ray burst afterglow).
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra imaging, combined with Very Large Telescope MUSE integral field spectroscopy of the counterpart and host galaxy of the first binary neutron star merger detected via gravitational wave emission by LIGO & Virgo, GW170817. The host galaxy, NGC 4993, is an S0 galaxy at z=0.009783. There is evidence for large, face-on spiral shells in continuum imaging, and edge-on spiral features visible in nebular emission lines. This suggests that NGC 4993 has undergone a relatively recent (<1 Gyr) ``dry'' merger. This merger may provide the fuel for a weak active nucleus seen in Chandra imaging. At the location of the counterpart, HST imaging implies there is no globular or young stellar cluster, with a limit of a few thousand solar masses for any young system. The population in the vicinity is predominantly old with <1% of any light arising from a population with ages <500 Myr. Both the host galaxy properties and those of the transient location are consistent with the distributions seen for short-duration gamma-ray bursts, although the source position lies well within the effective radius (r_e ~ 3 kpc), providing an r_e-normalized offset that is closer than ~90% of short GRBs. For the long delay time implied by the stellar population, this suggests that the kick velocity was significantly less than the galaxy escape velocity. We do not see any narrow host galaxy interstellar medium features within the counterpart spectrum, implying low extinction, and that the binary may lie in front of the bulk of the host galaxy.
  • We present late-time follow-up of the relativistic tidal disruption flare candidate Swift J1112.2-8238. We confirm the previously determined redshift of $z=0.8900\pm0.0005$ based on multiple emission line detections. {\em HST} imaging of the host galaxy indicates a complex and distorted morphology with at least two spatially distinct components. These are offset in velocity space by less than 350\,km\,s$^{-1}$ in VLT/X-Shooter observations, suggesting that the host is undergoing interaction with another galaxy. The transient position is consistent to 2.2$\sigma$ with the centre of a bulge-like component at a distance of 1.1$\pm$0.5\,kpc from its centre. Luminous, likely variable radio emission has also been observed, strengthening the similarities between Swift J1112.2-8238 and other previously identified relativistic tidal disruption flares. While the transient location is $\sim2\sigma$ from the host centroid, the disrupted nature of the host may provide an explanation for this. The tidal disruption model remains a good description for these events.
  • The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in late 2015 with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole - black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from September 2015 to January 2016. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overview of the Liverpool Telescope contribution to the follow-up campaign over this period. Given the hundreds of square degree uncertainty in the sky position of any gravitational wave event, efficient searching for candidate counterparts required survey telescopes with large (~degrees) fields-of-view. The role of the Liverpool Telescope was to provide follow-up classification spectroscopy of any candidates. We followed candidates associated with all three alerts, observing 1, 9 and 17 candidates respectively. We classify the majority of the transients we observed as supernovae.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 UV and near-IR (nIR) imaging of 21 Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) host galaxies, providing a sensitive probe of star formation and stellar mass with the hosts. Comparing the photometric and morphological properties of these host galaxies with those of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), we find SLSN hosts are fainter and more compact at both UV and nIR wavelengths, in some cases we barely recover hosts with absolute magnitude around MV ~ -14. With the addition of ground based optical observations and archival results, we produce spectral energy distribution (SED) fits to these hosts, and show that SLSN hosts possess lower stellar mass and star formation rates. This is most pronounced for the hydrogen deficient Type-I SLSN hosts, although Type-II H-rich SLSN host galaxies remain distinct from the bulk of CCSNe, spanning a remarkably broad range of absolute magnitudes, with ~30% of SLSNe-II arising from galaxies fainter than Mn I R ~ -14. The detection of our faintest SLSN hosts increases the confidence that SLSNe-I hosts are distinct from those of LGRBs in star formation rate and stellar mass, and suggests that apparent similarities in metallicity may be due to the limited fraction of hosts for which emission line metallicity measurements are feasible. The broad range of luminosities of SLSN-II hosts is difficult to describe by metallicity cuts, and does not match the expectations of any reasonable UV-weighted luminosity function, suggesting additional environmental constraints are likely necessary to yield hydrogen rich SLSNe.
  • We present late-time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to >4 years from discovery, and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched-off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than $t^{-70}$. Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of $L_X \sim 5 \times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of $t^{-5/3}$, similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of $M_{BH}=3 \times 10^6$ M$_{\odot}$, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint AGN or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30-50 days, with a peak magnitude (corrected for host galaxy extinction) of $M_R \sim -22-23$. The luminosity of the bump is significantly higher than seen in other, non-relativistic TDFs and does not match any re-brightening seen at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Its luminosity, light curve shape and spectrum are broadly similar to those seen in superluminous SNe, although subject to large uncertainties in the correction of the significant host extinction. We discuss these observations in the context of both TDF and massive star origins for Swift J1644+5734 and other candidate relativistic tidal flares.
  • We present observations of Swift J1112.2-8238, and identify it as a candidate relativistic tidal disruption flare (rTDF). The outburst was first detected by Swift/BAT in June 2011 as an unknown, long-lived (order of days) $\gamma$-ray transient source. We show that its position is consistent with the nucleus of a faint galaxy for which we establish a likely redshift of $z=0.89$ based on a single emission line that we interpret as the blended [OII]$\lambda3727$ doublet. At this redshift, the peak X/$\gamma$-ray luminosity exceeded $10^{47}$ ergs s$^{-1}$, while a spatially coincident optical transient source had $i^{\prime} \sim 22$ (M$_g \sim -21.4$ at $z=0.89$) during early observations, $\sim 20$ days after the Swift trigger. These properties place Swift J1112.2-8238 in a very similar region of parameter space to the two previously identified members of this class, Swift J1644+57 and Swift J2058+0516. As with those events the high-energy emission shows evidence for variability over the first few days, while late time observations, almost 3 years post-outburst, demonstrate that it has now switched off. Swift J1112.2-8238 brings the total number of such events observed by Swift to three, interestingly all detected by Swift over a $\sim$3 month period ($<3\%$ of its total lifetime as of March 2015). While this suggests the possibility that further examples may be uncovered by detailed searches of the BAT archives, the lack of any prime candidates in the years since 2011 means these events are undoubtedly rare.
  • Recent observations with Swift have begun to uncover $\gamma$-ray transients whose total energies are comparable to those of gamma-ray bursts (GRB), but have a duration an order of magnitude or more longer than the bulk of the GRB population. Some are suggested to form a new population of ultra-long GRBs, with a mean duration around $10^4$s, while a further population with $\gamma-$ray durations $>10^5$ s may represent manifestations of relativistic outflows from stars shredded around massive black holes in tidal disruption flares (TDFs). Here I review the observations of these new classes of events, discuss progress towards identifying their progenitors and suggest how new observations may both hone our understanding of the outbursts, and allow them to be used as probes, that offer both complementary and additional tools to GRBs.
  • Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the William Herschel Telescope and Nordic Optical Telescope in the nIR/optical, and with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have combined our data with the Swift X-Ray Telescope monitoring, and radio and millimeter observations from the literature to perform broadband modeling, and determined the macro- and microphysical parameters of the GRB blast wave. By combining the broadband modeling results with our nIR upper limits we have put constraints on the extinction in the host galaxy. This is consistent with the optical extinction we have derived from the excess X-ray absorption, and higher than in other dark bursts for which similar modeling work has been performed. We also present deep imaging of the host galaxy with the Keck I telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which resulted in a well-constrained photometric redshift, giving credence to the tentative spectroscopic redshift we obtained with the Keck II telescope, and estimates for the stellar mass and star formation rate of the host. Finally, our high resolution HST images of the host galaxy show that the GRB afterglow position is offset from the brightest regions of the host galaxy, in contrast to studies of optically bright GRBs.
  • We present rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) and optical observations of the host galaxy of GRB090423 at z=8.23 from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Spitzer Space Telescope, respectively. The host remains undetected to 3-sigma limits of Fnu(222 GHz)<33 microJy and Fnu(3.6 micron)<81 nJy. The FIR limit is about 20 times fainter than the luminosity of the local ULIRG Arp220, and comparable to the local starburst M82. Comparing to model spectral energy distributions we place a limit on the IR luminosity of L_IR(8-1000 micron)<3e10 Lsun, corresponding to a limit on the obscured star formation rate of SFR_IR<5 Msun/yr; for comparison, the limit on the unobscured star formation rate from Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame UV observations is SFR_UV<1 Msun/yr. We also place a limit on the host galaxy stellar mass of <5e7 Msun (for a stellar population age of 100 Myr and constant star formation rate). Finally, we compare our millimeter observations to those of field galaxies at z>4 (Lyman break galaxies, Ly-alpha emitters, and submillimeter galaxies), and find that our limit on the FIR luminosity is the most constraining to date, although the field galaxies have much larger rest-frame UV/optical luminosities than the host of GRB090423 by virtue of their selection techniques. We conclude that GRB host galaxies at z>4, especially those with measured interstellar medium metallicities from afterglow spectroscopy, are an attractive sample for future ALMA studies of high redshift obscured star formation.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst ($E_{iso} >10^{54}$ erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light ~17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN~2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v$_{ph}$ ~15,000 km/s). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN~2010bh (v$_{ph}$ ~ 30,000 km/s), but SN 2010bh is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ~4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Msol/yr), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been found to be associated with broad-lined type-Ic supernovae (SNe), but only a handful of cases have been studied in detail. Prompted by the discovery of the exceptionally bright, nearby GRB130427A (redshift z=0.3399), we aim at characterising the properties of its associated SN2013cq. This is the first opportunity to test directly the progenitors of high-luminosity GRBs. We monitored the field of the Swift long duration GRB130427A using the 3.6-m TNG and the 8.2-m VLT during the time interval between 3.6 and 51.6 days after the burst. Photometric and spectroscopic observations revealed the presence of the type Ic SN2013cq. Spectroscopic analysis suggests that SN2013cq resembles two previous GRB-SNe, SN1998bw and SN2010bh associated with GRB980425 and XRF100316D, respectively. The bolometric light curve of SN2013cq, which is significantly affected by the host galaxy contribution, is systematically more luminous than that of SN2010bh ($\sim$ 2 mag at peak), but is consistent with SN1998bw. The comparison with the light curve model of another GRB-connected SN2003dh, indicates that SN2013cq is consistent with the model when brightened by 20%. This suggests a synthesised radioactive $^{56}$Ni mass of $\sim 0.4 M_\odot$. GRB130427A/SN2013cq is the first case of low-z GRB-SN connection where the GRB energetics are extreme ($E_{\rm \gamma, iso} \sim 10^{54}$ erg). We show that the maximum luminosities attained by SNe associated with GRBs span a very narrow range, but those associated with XRFs are significantly less luminous. On the other hand the isotropic energies of the accompanying GRBs span 6 orders of magnitude (10$^{48}$ erg $< E_{\rm \gamma, iso} <$ 10$^{54}$ erg), although this range is reduced when corrected for jet collimation. The GRB total radiated energy is in fact a small fraction of the SN energy budget.
  • Short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to be related to the violent merger of compact objects, such as neutron stars or black holes, which makes them promising sources of gravitational waves. The detection of a 'kilonova'-like signature associated to the Swift-detected GRB 130603B has suggested that this event is the result of a compact object merger. Our knowledge on SGRB has been, until now, mostly based on the absence of supernova signatures and the analysis of the host galaxies to which they cannot always be securely associated. Further progress has been significantly hampered by the faintness and rapid fading of their optical counterparts (afterglows), which has so far precluded spectroscopy of such events. Afterglow spectroscopy is the key tool to firmly determine the distance at which the burst was produced, crucial to understand its physics, and study its local environment. Here we present the first spectra of a prototypical SGRB afterglow in which both absorption and emission features are clearly detected. Together with multiwavelength photometry we study the host and environment of GRB 130603B. From these spectra we determine the redshift of the burst to be z = 0.3565+/-0.0002, measure rich dynamics both in absorption and emission, and a substantial line of sight extinction of A_V = 0.86+/-0.15 mag. The GRB was located at the edge of a disrupted arm of a moderately star forming galaxy with near-solar metallicity. Unlike for most long GRBs (LGRBs), N_HX / A_V is consistent with the Galactic ratio, indicating that the explosion site differs from those found in LGRBs. The merger is not associated with the most star-forming region of the galaxy; however, it did occur in a dense region, implying a rapid merger or a low natal kick velocity for the compact object binary.
  • Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions that we can witness in the Universe. Studying the most extreme cases of these phenomena allows us to constrain the limits for the progenitor models. In this Letter, we study the prompt emission, afterglow, and host galaxy of GRB 120624B, one of the brightest GRBs detected by Fermi, to derive the energetics of the event and characterise the host galaxy in which it was produced. Following the high-energy detection we conducted a multi-wavelength follow-up campaign, including near-infrared imaging from HAWKI/VLT, optical from OSIRIS/GTC, X-ray observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and at sub-millimetre/millimetre wavelengths from SMA. Optical/nIR spectroscopy was performed with X-shooter/VLT. We detect the X-ray and nIR afterglow of the burst and determine a redshift of z = 2.1974 +/- 0.0002 through the identification of emission lines of [OII], [OIII] and H-alpha from the host galaxy of the GRB. This implies an energy release of Eiso = (3.0+/-0.2)x10^54 erg, amongst the most luminous ever detected. The observations of the afterglow indicate high obscuration with AV > 1.5. The host galaxy is compact, with R1/2 < 1.6 kpc, but luminous, at L ~ 1.5 L* and has a star formation rate of 91 +/- 6 Msol/yr as derived from H-alpha. As other highly obscured GRBs, GRB 120624B is hosted by a luminous galaxy, which we also proof to be compact, with a very intense star formation. It is one of the most luminous host galaxies associated with a GRB, showing that the host galaxies of long GRBs are not always blue dwarf galaxies, as previously thought.
  • The discovery of a population of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), with peak luminosities a factor of ~100 brighter than normal SNe (typically SLSNe have M_V <-21), has shown an unexpected diversity in core-collapse supernova properties. Numerous models have been postulated for the nature of these events, including a strong interaction of the shockwave with a dense circumstellar environment, a re-energizing of the outflow via a central engine, or an origin in the catastrophic destruction of the star following a loss of pressure due to pair production in an extremely massive stellar core (so-called pair instability supernovae). Here we consider constraints that can be placed on the explosion mechanism of Hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe-I) via X-ray observations, with XMM-Newton, Chandra and Swift, and show that at least one SLSNe-I is likely the brightest X-ray supernovae ever observed, with L_X ~ 10^45 ergs/s, ~150 days after its initial discovery. This is a luminosity 3 orders of magnitude higher than seen in other X-ray supernovae powered via circumstellar interactions. Such high X-ray luminosities are sufficient to ionize the ejecta and markedly reduce the optical depth, making it possible to see deep into the ejecta and any source of emission that resides there. Alternatively, an engine could have powered a moderately relativistic jet external to the ejecta, similar to those seen in gamma-ray bursts. If the detection of X-rays does require an engine it implies that these SNe do create compact objects, and that the stars are not completely destroyed in a pair instability event. Future observations will determine which, if any, of these mechanisms are at play in superluminous supernovae.
  • The intrinsic X-ray emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is often found to be absorbed over and above the column density through our own galaxy. The extra component is usually assumed to be due to absorbing gas lying within the host galaxy of the GRB itself. There is an apparent correlation between the equivalent column density of hydrogen, N(H,intrinsic) (assuming it to be at the GRB redshift), and redshift, z, with the few z>6 GRBs showing the greatest intrinsic column densities. We investigate the N(H,intrinsic) - z relation using a large sample of Swift GRBs, as well as active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasar samples, paying particular attention to the spectral energy distributions of the two highest redshift GRBs. Various possible sample biases and systematics that might produce such a correlation are considered, and we conclude that the correlation is very likely to be real. This may indicate either an evolutionary effect in the host galaxy properties, or a contribution from gas along the line-of-sight, in the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) or intervening absorbing clouds. Employing a more realistic model for IGM absorption than in previous works, we find that this may explain much of the observed opacity at z>~3 providing it is not too hot, likely between 10^5 K and 10^6.5 K, and moderately metal enriched, Z~0.2 Z_sun. This material could therefore constitute the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium. However, a comparable level of absorption is also expected from the cumulative effect of intervening cold gas clouds, and given current uncertainties it is not possible to say which, if either, dominates. At lower redshifts, we conclude that gas in the host galaxies must be the dominant contributor to the observed X-ray absorption.
  • We present comprehensive multiwavelength observations of three gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with durations of several thousand seconds. We demonstrate that these events are extragalactic transients; in particular we resolve the long-standing conundrum of the distance of GRB 101225A (the "Christmas-day burst"), finding it to have a redshift z=0.847, and showing that two apparently similar events (GRB 111209A and GRB 121027A) lie at z=0.677 and z=1.773 respectively. The systems show extremely unusual X-ray and optical lightcurves, very different from classical GRBs, with long lasting highly variable X-ray emission and optical light curves that exhibit little correlation with the behaviour seen in the X-ray. Their host galaxies are faint, compact, and highly star forming dwarf galaxies, typical of "blue compact galaxies". We propose that these bursts are the prototypes of a hitherto largely unrecognized population of ultra-long GRBs, that while observationally difficult to detect may be astrophysically relatively common. The long durations may naturally be explained by the engine driven explosions of stars of much larger radii than normally considered for GRB progenitors which are thought to have compact Wolf-Rayet progenitor stars. However, we cannot unambiguously identify supernova signatures within their light curves or spectra. We also consider the alternative possibility that they arise from the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes.
  • A significant fraction of the Long Gamma-ray Bursts (LGRBs) in the Swift sample have a plateau phase showing evidence of ongoing energy injection. We suggest that many Short Gamma-ray Bursts (SGRBs) detected by the Swift satellite also show evidence of energy injection. Explaining this observation within the typical SGRB progenitor model is challenging as late time accretion, often used to explain plateaus in LGRBs, is likely to be absent from the SGRB population. Alternatively, it is predicted that the remnant of NS-NS mergers may not collapse immediately to a BH (or even collapse at all), forming instead an unstable millisecond pulsar (magnetar) which powers a plateau phase in the X-ray lightcurve. By fitting the magnetar model to all of the Swift SGRBs observed until May 2012, we find that about half can be clearly fitted with a magnetar plateau phase while the rest are consistent with forming a magnetar but the data are insufficient to prove a plateau phase. More data, both at early times and a larger sample, are required to confirm this. This model can be tested by detecting the gravitational wave emission from events using the next generation gravitational wave observatories.
  • We report on the spectroscopic detection of supernova SN 2010ma associated with the long gamma-ray burst GRB 101219B. We observed the optical counterpart of the GRB on three nights with the X-shooter spectrograph at the VLT. From weak absorption lines, we measure a redshift of z = 0.55. The first epoch UV--near-infrared afterglow spectrum, taken 11.6 hr after the burst, is well fit by a power law consistent with the slope of the X-ray spectrum. The second and third epoch spectra (obtained 16.4 and 36.7 days after the burst), however, display clear bumps closely resembling those of the broad-lined type-Ic SN 1998bw if placed at z=0.55. Apart from demonstrating that spectroscopic SN signatures can be observed for GRBs at these large distances, our discovery makes a step forward in establishing a general connection between GRBs and SNe. In fact, unlike most previous unambiguous GRB-associated SNe, GRB 101219B has a large gamma-ray energy (E_iso = 4.2 x 10^{51} erg), a bright afterglow, and obeys the "Amati" relation, thus being fully consistent with the cosmological population of GRBs.
  • We report the Swift discovery of nearby long, soft gamma-ray burst GRB 100316D, and the subsequent unveiling of its low redshift host galaxy and associated supernova. We derive the redshift of the event to be z = 0.0591 +/- 0.0001 and provide accurate astrometry for the GRB-SN. We study the extremely unusual prompt emission with time-resolved gamma-ray to X-ray spectroscopy, and find that the spectrum is best modelled with a thermal component in addition to a synchrotron emission component with a low peak energy. The X-ray light curve has a remarkably shallow decay out to at least 800 s. The host is a bright, blue galaxy with a highly disturbed morphology and we use Gemini South, VLT and HST observations to measure some of the basic host galaxy properties. We compare and contrast the X-ray emission and host galaxy of GRB 100316D to a subsample of GRB-SNe. GRB 100316D is unlike the majority of GRB-SNe in its X-ray evolution, but resembles rather GRB 060218, and we find that these two events have remarkably similar high energy prompt emission properties. Comparison of the host galaxies of GRB-SNe demonstrates, however, that there is a great diversity in the environments in which GRB-SNe can be found. GRB 100316D is an important addition to the currently sparse sample of spectroscopically confirmed GRB-SNe, from which a better understanding of long GRB progenitors and the GRB--SN connection can be gleaned.
  • The majority of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to originate from the merger of compact binary systems collapsing directly to form a black hole. However, it has been proposed that both SGRBs and long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) may, on rare occasions, form an unstable millisecond pulsar (magnetar) prior to final collapse. GRB 090515, detected by the Swift satellite was extremely short, with a T_90 of 0.036 +/- 0.016 s, and had a very low fluence of 2 x 10^-8 erg cm^-2 and faint optical afterglow. Despite this, the 0.3 - 10 keV flux in the first 200 s was the highest observed for a SGRB by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The X-ray light curve showed an unusual plateau and steep decay, becoming undetectable after ~500 s. This behaviour is similar to that observed in some long bursts proposed to have magnetars contributing to their emission. In this paper, we present the Swift observations of GRB 090515 and compare it to other gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the Swift sample. Additionally, we present optical observations from Gemini, which detected an afterglow of magnitude 26.4 +/- 0.1 at T+ 1.7 hours after the burst. We discuss potential causes of the unusual 0.3 - 10 keV emission and suggest it might be energy injection from an unstable millisecond pulsar. Using the duration and flux of the plateau of GRB 090515, we place constraints on the millisecond pulsar spin period and magnetic field.
  • The aim of this paper is to study the environment and intervening absorbers of the gamma-ray burst GRB 090926A through analysis of optical spectra of its afterglow. We analyze medium resolution spectroscopic observations (R=10 000, corresponding to 30 km/s, S/N=15 - 30 and wavelength range 3000-25000) of the optical afterglow of GRB 090926A, taken with X-shooter at the VLT ~ 22 hr after the GRB trigger. The spectrum shows that the ISM in the GRB host galaxy at z = 2.1071 is rich in absorption features, with two components contributing to the line profiles. In addition to the ground state lines, we detect C II, O I, Si II, Fe II and Ni II excited absorption features. No host galaxy emission lines, molecular absorption features nor diffuse interstellar bands are detected in the spectrum. The Hydrogen column density associated to GRB 090926A is log N_H/cm^{-2} = 21.60 +/- 0.07, and the metallicity of the host galaxy is in the range [X/H] =3.2X10^{-3}-1.2X10^{-2} with respect to the solar values, i.e., among the lowest values ever observed for a GRB host galaxy. A comparison with galactic chemical evolution models has suggested that the host of GRB090926A is likely to be a dwarf irregular galaxy. We put an upper limit to the Hydrogen molecular fraction of the host galaxy ISM, which is f < 7X10^{-7}. We derive information on the distance between the host absorbing gas and the site of the GRB explosion. The distance of component I is found to be 2.40 +/- 0.15 kpc, while component II is located far away from the GRB, possibly at ~ 5 kpc. These values are compatible with that found for other GRBs.
  • On 2010 March 19, the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope triggered on a short burst with temporal and spectral characteristics similar to those of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts. The source location, however, did not coincide with any known SGR. Subsequent observations of the source error box with the Swift/X-ray Telescope and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) led to the discovery of a new X-ray source, with a spin period of 7.56 s, confirming SGR J1833-0832 as a new magnetar. Based on our detailed temporal and spectral analyses, we show that the new SGR is rapidly spinning down (4 x 10^{-12} s/s) and find an inferred dipole magnetic field of 1.8 x 10^{14} G. We also show that the X-ray flux of SGR J1833-0832 remained constant for approximately 20 days following the burst and then started to decline. We derived an accurate location of the source with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and we searched for a counterpart in deep optical and infrared observations of SGR J1833-0832, and for radio pulsed emission with the Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope. Finally, we compare the spectral and temporal properties of the source to the other magnetar candidates.
  • We show that the spectrum of the unusual transient SCP06F6 is consistent with emission from a cool, optically thick and carbon-rich atmosphere if the transient is located at a redshift of z~0.14. The implied extragalactic nature of the transient rules out novae, shell flashes, and V838 Mon-like events as cause of the observed brightening. The distance to SCP06F6 implies a peak magnitude of M_I ~- 18, in the regime of supernovae. While the morphology of the light curve of SCP06F6 around the peak in brightness resembles the slowly evolving Type IIn supernovae SN1994Y and SN2006gy its spectroscopic appearence differs from all previous observed supernovae. We further report the detection of an X-ray source co-incident with SCP06F6 in a target of opportunity XMM-Newton observation made during the declining phase of the transient. The X-ray luminosity of L_X ~- (5+-1)e42 erg/s is two orders of magnitude higher than observed to date from supernovae. If related to a supernova event, SCP06F6 may define a new class. An alternative, though less likely, scenario is the tidal disruption of a carbon-rich star.