• We present a framework for the hierarchical identification and characterization of voids based on the Watershed Void Finder. The Hierarchical Void Finder is based on a generalization of the scale space of a density field invoked in order to trace the hierarchical nature and structure of cosmological voids. At each level of the hierarchy, the watershed transform is used to identify the voids at that particular scale. By identifying the overlapping regions between watershed basins in adjacent levels, the hierarchical void tree is constructed. Applications on a hierarchical Voronoi model and on a set of cosmological simulations illustrate its potential.
  • We study the ultraviolet to far-infrared (hereafter UV-to-IR) SEDs of a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 0.7) UV-selected galaxies from the ELAIS-N1 and ELAIS-N2 fields by fitting a multi-wavelength dataset to a library of GRASIL templates. Star formation related properties of the galaxies are derived from the library of models by using the Bayesian statistics. We find a decreasing presence of galaxies with low attenuation and low total luminosity as redshift decreases, which does not hold for high total luminosity galaxies. In addition the dust attenuation of low mass galaxies increases as redshift decreases, and this trend seems to disappear for galaxies with M* > 10^11 M_sun. This result is consistent with a mass dependent evolution of the dust to gas ratio, which could be driven by a mass dependent efficiency of star formation in star forming galaxies. The specific star formation rates (SSFR) decrease with increasing stellar mass at all redshifts, and for a given stellar mass the SSFR decreases with decreasing redshift. The differences in the slope of the M*--SSFR relation found between this work and others at similar redshift could be explained by the adopted selection criteria of the samples which, for a UV selected sample, favours blue, star forming galaxies.
  • This work presents the main ultraviolet (UV) and far-infrared (FIR) properties of two samples of nearby galaxies selected from the GALEX ($\lambda = 2315$\AA, hereafter NUV) and IRAS ($\lambda = 60\mu$m) surveys respectively. They are built in order to get detection at both wavelengths for most of the galaxies. Star formation rate (SFR) estimators based on the UV and FIR emissions are compared. Systematic differences are found between the SFR estimators for individual galaxies based on the NUV fluxes corrected for dust attenuation and on the total IR luminosity. A combined estimator based on NUV and IR luminosities seems to be the best proxy over the whole range of values of SFR. Although both samples present similar average values of the birthrate parameter b, their star-formation-related properties are substantially different: NUV-selected galaxies tend to show larger values of $b$ for lower masses, SFRs and dust attenuations, supporting previous scenarios for the star formation history (SFH). Conversely, about 20% of the FIR-selected galaxies show high values of $b$, SFR and NUV attenuation. These galaxies, most of them being LIRGs and ULIRGs, break down the downsizing picture for the SFH, however their relative contribution per unit volume is small in the local Universe. Finally, the cosmic SFR density of the local Universe is estimated in a consistent way from the NUV and IR luminosities.
  • The ELAIS S1 field was observed by GALEX in both its Wide Spectroscopic and Deep Imaging Survey modes. This field was previously observed by the Infrared Space Observatory and we made use of the catalogue of multi-wavelength data published by the ELAIS consortium to select galaxies common to the two samples. Among the 959 objects with GALEX spectroscopy, 88 are present in the ELAIS catalog and 19 are galaxies with an optical spectroscopic redshift. The distribution of redshifts covers the range $0<z<1.6$. The selected galaxies have bolometric IR luminosities $10<Log(L_{IR})<13$ (deduced from the $15 \mu m$ flux using ISOCAM) which means that we cover a wide range of galaxies from normal to Ultra Luminous IR Galaxies. The mean ($\sigma$) UV luminosity (not corrected for extinction) amounts to $Log(\lambda.L_{1530}) = 9.8 (0.6)$ $L_\sun$ for the low-z ($z \le 0.35$) sample. The UV slope $\beta$ (assuming $f_\lambda \propto \lambda^\beta$) correlates with the GALEX FUV-NUV color if the sample is restricted to galaxies below $z < 0.1$. Taking advantage of the UV and IR data, we estimate the dust attenuation from the IR/UV ratio and compare it to the UV slope $\beta$. We find that it is not possible to uniquely estimate the dust attenuation from $\beta$ for our sample of galaxies. These galaxies are highly extinguished with a median value $A_{FUV} = 2.7 \pm 0.8$. Once the dust correction applied, the UV- and IR-based SFRs correlate. For the closest galaxy with the best quality spectrum, we see a feature consistent with being produced by a bump near 220nm in the attenuation curve.
  • We have used the 2dF instrument on the AAT to obtain redshifts of a sample of z<3, 18.0<g<21.85 quasars selected from SDSS imaging. These data are part of a larger joint programme: the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey (2SLAQ). We describe the quasar selection algorithm and present the resulting luminosity function of 5645 quasars in 105.7 deg^2. The bright end number counts and luminosity function agree well with determinations from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) data to g\sim20.2. However, at the faint end the 2SLAQ number counts and luminosity function are steeper than the final 2QZ results from Croom et al. (2004), but are consistent with the preliminary 2QZ results from Boyle et al. (2000). Using the functional form adopted for the 2QZ analysis, we find a faint end slope of beta=-1.78+/-0.03 if we allow all of the parameters to vary and beta=-1.45+/-0.03 if we allow only the faint end slope and normalization to vary. Our maximum likelihood fit to the data yields 32% more quasars than the final 2QZ parameterization, but is not inconsistent with other g>21 deep surveys. The 2SLAQ data exhibit no well defined ``break'' but do clearly flatten with increasing magnitude. The shape of the quasar luminosity function derived from 2SLAQ is in good agreement with that derived from type I quasars found in hard X-ray surveys. [Abridged]
  • We use the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images of M83 obtained by GALEX to compute the radial profile of the UV spectral slope in the star forming disk. We briefly present a model of its chemical evolution which allows us to obtain realistic intrinsic properties of the stellar populations. Using corollary data, we also compute the profiles of H-alpha/H-beta and of the total IR (TIR) to FUV ratio. Both data and model are used to estimate and compare the extinction gradients at the FUV wavelength obtained from these various indicators. We discuss the implications for the determination of the star formation rate.
  • The total ultraviolet (UV) flux (from 1412 to 2718 AA) of M 101 is compared on a pixel-to-pixel basis with the total far-infrared (FIR) flux (from 60 to 170 micron), using the maps of the galaxy taken by GALEX in the near-UV and far-UV and by ISOPHOT at 60, 100 and 170 micron. The main result of this investigation is the discovery of a tight dependence of the FIR/UV ratio on radius, with values monotonically decreasing from around 4 in the nuclear region to nearly zero towards the edge of the optical disk. Although the tightness of this dependence is in part attributable to resolution effects, the result is consistent with the presence of a large-scale distribution of diffuse dust having a face-on optical depth which decreases with radius and which dominates over the more localized variations in opacity between the arm and interarm regions. We also find a trend for the FIR/UV ratio to take on higher values in the regions of diffuse interarm emission than in the spiral-arm regions, at a given radius. This is interpreted quantitatively in terms of the escape probability of UV photons from spiral arms and their subsequent scattering in the interarm regions, and in terms of the larger relative contribution of optical photons to the heating of the dust in the interarm regions.
  • We compare the dust attenuation properties of two samples of galaxies purely selected in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band (1750-2750 A, lambda_m = 2310 A) and in the far-infrared (FIR) at 60micron. These samples are built using the GALEX and IRAS sky surveys over ~600 square degrees. The NUV selected sample contains 95 galaxies detected down to NUV=16mag (AB system). 83 galaxies in this sample are spirals or irregulars and only two of them are not detected at 60micron. The FIR selected sample is built from the IRAS PSCz catalog complete down to 0.6Jy. Among the 163 sources, we select 118 star forming galaxies well measured by IRAS, all but 1 are detected in NUV and 14 galaxies are not detected in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) band (1350-1750 A, lambda_m = 1530 A). The dust to ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) flux ratio is calibrated to estimate the dust attenuation at both wavelengths. The median value of the attenuation in NUV is found to be ~1 mag for the NUV selected sample versus ~2 mag for the FIR selected one. Within both samples, the dust attenuation is found to correlate with the luminosity of the galaxies. Almost all the NUV selected galaxies and 2/3 of the FIR selected sample exhibit a lower dust attenuation than that expected from the tight relation found previously for starburst galaxies between the dust attenuation and the slope of the ultraviolet continuum. The situation is inverse for one third of the FIR selected galaxies: their extinction is higher than that deduced from their FUV-NUV color and the relation valid for starbursts.
  • We derive a variety of physical parameters including star formation rates (SFRs), dust attenuation and burst mass fractions for 6472 galaxies observed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and present in the SDSS DR1 main spectroscopic sample. Parameters are estimated in a statistical way by comparing each observed broad-band SED (two GALEX and five SDSS bands) with an extensive library of model galaxy SEDs, which cover a wide range of star formation histories and include stochastic starbursts. We compare the constraints derived using SDSS bands only with those derived using the combination of SDSS and GALEX photometry. We find that the addition of the GALEX bands leads to significant improvement in the estimation of both the dust optical depth and the star formation rate over timescales of 100 Myr to 1 Gyr in a galaxy. We are sensitive to SFRs as low as 10^{-3} M_sun/yr, and we find that low levels of star formation (SF) are mostly associated with early-type, red galaxies. The least massive galaxies have ratios of current to past-averaged SF rates (b-parameter) consistent with constant SF over a Hubble time. For late-type galaxies, this ratio on average decreases with mass. We find that b correlates tightly with NUV-r color, implying that the SF history of a galaxy can be constrained on the basis of the NUV-r color alone. The fraction of galaxies that have undergone a significant starburst episode within the last 1 Gyr steeply declines with mass-from ~20% for galaxies with ~10^8 M_sun to ~5% for ~10^11 M_sun galaxies.
  • M32, the compact elliptical-galaxy companion to the Andromeda spiral galaxy has been imaged by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) in two ultraviolet bands, centered at ~1500 (FUV) and 2300 Angstroms (NUV). The imaging data have been carefully decomposed so as to properly account for the complicated background contamination from the disk of M31. We have derived the surface brightness and color profiles finding a slightly positive color gradient of Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)=+0.15+/-0.03 within one effective radius. Earlier data from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope suggested that M32 had an extremely large (negative) FUV-optical color gradient (Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)<-2), inverted with respect to the majority of gradients seen in giant elliptical galaxies. Our new results show that, despite of its very low UV-upturn, M32 has similar UV properties to those observed in luminous elliptical galaxies.
  • The NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) satellite has obtained simultaneous near and far ultraviolet light curves of the ROTSE-I Catalog RR Lyrae ab-type variable star J143753.84+345924.8. A series of 38 GALEX Deep Imaging Survey observations well distributed in phase within the star's 0.56432d period shows an AB=4.9mag variation in the far UV (1350-1750A) band and an AB=1.8mag variation in the near UV (1750-2750A) band, compared with only a 0.8mag variation in the broad, unfiltered ROTSE-I (4500-10000A) band. These GALEX UV observations are the first to reveal a large RR Lyrae amplitude variation at wavelengths below 1800A. We compare the GALEX and ROTSE-I observations to predictions made by recent Kurucz stellar atmosphere models. We use published physical parameters for the comparable period (0.57433d), well-observed RR Lyrae star WY Antliae to compute predicted FUV, NUV, and ROTSE-I light curves for J143753.84+345924.8. The observed light curves agree with the Kurucz predictions for [Fe/H]=-1.25 to within AB=0.2mag in the GALEX NUV and ROTSE-I bands, and within 0.5mag in the FUV. At all metallicities between solar and one hundredth solar, the Kurucz models predict 6-8mag of variation at wavelengths between 1000-1700A. Other variable stars with similar temperature variations, such as Cepheids, should also have large-amplitude FUV light curves, observable during the ongoing GALEX imaging surveys.
  • The Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe (DEEP) is a series of spectroscopic surveys of faint galaxies, targeted at the properties and clustering of galaxies at redshifts z ~ 1. We present the redshift catalog of the DEEP 1 GSS pilot phase of this project, a Keck/LRIS survey in the HST/WFPC2 Groth Survey Strip. The redshift catalog and data, including reduced spectra, are publicly available through a Web-accessible database. The catalog contains 658 secure galaxy redshifts with a median z=0.65, and shows large-scale structure walls to z = 1. We find a bimodal distribution in the galaxy color-magnitude diagram which persists to z = 1. A similar color division has been seen locally by the SDSS and to z ~ 1 by COMBO-17. For red galaxies, we find a reddening of only 0.11 mag from z ~ 0.8 to now, about half the color evolution measured by COMBO-17. We measure structural properties of the galaxies from the HST imaging, and find that the color division corresponds generally to a structural division. Most red galaxies, ~ 75%, are centrally concentrated, with a red bulge or spheroid, while blue galaxies usually have exponential profiles. However, there are two subclasses of red galaxies that are not bulge-dominated: edge-on disks and a second category which we term diffuse red galaxies (DIFRGs). The distant edge-on disks are similar in appearance and frequency to those at low redshift, but analogs of DIFRGs are rare among local red galaxies. DIFRGs have significant emission lines, indicating that they are reddened mainly by dust rather than age. The DIFRGs in our sample are all at z>0.64, suggesting that DIFRGs are more prevalent at high redshifts; they may be related to the dusty or irregular extremely red objects (EROs) beyond z>1.2 that have been found in deep K-selected surveys. (abridged)
  • Astronomy is entering a new era as multiple, large area, digital sky surveys are in production. The resulting datasets are truly remarkable in their own right; however, a revolutionary step arises in the aggregation of complimentary multi-wavelength surveys (i.e. the cross-identification of a billion sources). Federating these different datasets, however, is an extremely challenging task. With this task in mind, we have identified several areas where community standardization can provide enormous benefits in order to develop the techniques and technologies necessary to solve the problems inherent in federating these large databases, as well as the mining of the resultant aggregate data. Several of these areas are domain specific, however, the majority of them are not. We feel that the inclusion of non-astronomical partnerships can provide tremendous insights.
  • We present a novel way to detect objects when multiband images are available. Typically, object detection is performed in one of the available bands or on a somewhat arbitrarily co-added image. Our technique provides an almost optimal way to use all the color information available. We build up a composite image of the N passbands where each pixel value corresponds to the probability that the given pixel is just sky. By knowing the probability distribution of sky pixels (a chi-square distribution with N degrees of freedom), the data can be used to derive the distribution of pixels dominated by object flux. From the two distributions an optimal segmentation threshold can be determined. Clipping the probability image at this threshold yields a mask, where pixels unlikely to be sky are tagged. After using a standard connected-pixel criterion, the regions of this mask define the detected objects. Applying this technique to the Hubble Deep Field data, we find that we can extend the detection limit of the data below that possible using linearly co-added images. We also discuss possible ways of enhancing object detection probabilities for certain well defined classes of objects by using various optimized linear combinations of the pixel fluxes (optimal subspace filtering).
  • For faint photometric surveys our ability to quantify the clustering of galaxies has depended on interpreting the angular correlation function as a function of the limiting magnitude of the data. Due to the broad redshift distribution of galaxies at faint magnitude limits the correlation signal has been extremely difficult to detect and interpret. We introduce a new technique for measuring the evolution of clustering. We utilize photometric redshifts, derived from multicolor surveys, to isolate redshift intervals and calculate the evolution of the amplitude of the angular 2-pt correlation function. Applying these techniques to the the Hubble Deep Field we find that the shape of the correlation function, at z=1, is consistent with a power law with a slope of -0.8. For z>0.4 the best fit to the data is given by a model of clustering evolution with a comoving r0 = 2.37 Mpc and eps = -0.4 +/- 0.5, consistent with published measures of the clustering evolution. To match the canonical value of r0 = 5.4 Mpc, found for the clustering of local galaxies, requires a value of eps = 2.10 +/- 0.5 (significantly more than linear evolution). The log likelihood of this latter fit is 4.15 less than that for the r0 = 2.37 Mpc model. We, therefore, conclude that the parameterization of the clustering evolution of (1+z)^-(3+eps) is not a particularly good fit to the data.
  • The effects of sampling are investigated on measurements of counts-in-cells in three-dimensional magnitude limited galaxy surveys, with emphasis on moments of the underlying smooth galaxy density field convolved with a spherical window. A new estimator is proposed for measuring the k-th order moment < rho^k >: the weighted factorial moment F_k[w], corrected for the effects of the varying selection function. The cosmic error on the measurement of F_k[w] is computed via the the formalism of Szapudi & Colombi (1996), which is generalized to include selection effects. The integral equation for finding the minimum variance weight is solved numerically, and an intuitive analytical approximation is derived. The resulting estimator is more accurate than the traditional method of counts-in-cells in volume limited samples, which discards useful information. As a practical example we consider the case of the future Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Optimal (sparse) sampling strategies for designing magnitude limited redshift surveys are investigated as well. It is found that the optimal strategy depends greatly on the statistics and scales considered. Finally we consider the issue of designing the geometry of a catalog, when it covers only a small fraction of the sky.
  • The Hubble Deep Field (HDF) is the deepest set of multicolor optical photometric observations ever undertaken, and offers a valuable data set with which to study galaxy evolution. Combining the optical WFPC2 data with ground-based near-infrared photometry, we derive photometrically estimated redshifts for HDF galaxies with J<23.5. We demonstrate that incorporating the near-infrared data reduces the uncertainty in the estimated redshifts by approximately 40% and is required to remove systematic uncertainties within the redshift range 1<z<2. Utilizing these photometric redshifts, we determine the evolution of the comoving ultraviolet (2800 A) luminosity density (presumed to be proportional to the global star formation rate) from a redshift of z=0.5 to z=2. We find that the global star formation rate increases rapidly with redshift, rising by a factor of 12 from a redshift of zero to a peak at z~1.5. For redshifts beyond 1.5, it decreases monotonically. Our measures of the star formation rate are consistent with those found by Lilly et al. (1996) from the CFRS at z<1, and by Madau et al. (1996) from Lyman break galaxies at z > 2, and bridge the redshift gap between those two samples. The overall star formation or metal enrichment rate history is consistent with the predictions of Pei and Fall (1995) based on the evolving HI content of Lyman-alpha QSO absorption line systems.
  • We present new and exciting results on our search for large-scale structure at high redshift. Specifically, we have just completed a detailed analysis of the area surrounding the cluster CL0016+16 (z=0.546) and have the most compelling evidence yet that this cluster resides in the middle of a supercluster. From the distribution of galaxies and clusters we find that the supercluster appears to be a sheet of galaxies, viewed almost edge-on, with a radial extent of 31 Mpc, transverse dimension of 12 Mpc, and a thickness of ~4 Mpc. The surface density and velocity dispersion of this coherent structure are consistent with the properties of the ``Great Wall'' in the CfA redshift survey.
  • We report 328 redshifts, b$_J$ magnitudes and b$_J$--r$_F$ colors of galaxies measured in a redshift survey of a 4$^\circ$ $\times$ 0.67$^\circ$ slice close to the north Galactic pole. The faintest galaxies in this survey have a magnitude of b$_J$ $\sim$ 20.5. The redshifts present external errors of the order of 70 \kms, and we estimate that the mean photometry errors are $\sim$ 0.2 for magnitudes and $\sim$ 0.3 for colors. The redshift completeness level of the sample is of the order of $\sim$ 35\% at b$_J$=20, and part of this rather low completeness is the result of the combination of limitations imposed by the multifiber system with the clustering of galaxies, and an insufficient number of configurations. At the nominal magnitude limit of the survey, we were able to measure redshifts for $\sim$ 70 \% of the galaxies we observed. From the correlation between observed properties of the galaxies in this sample, we demonstrate that the mean surface brightness is a major limiting factor in our ability to measure redshifts of faint objects.
  • As a means of better understanding the evolution of optically selected galaxies we consider the distribution of galaxies within the multicolor space $U$, $B_J$, $R_F$ and $I_N$. We find that they form an almost planar distribution out to $B_J =22.5$ and $z<0.3$. The position of a galaxy within this plane is dependent on its redshift, luminosity and spectral type. While in the original $U$, $B_J$, $R_F$ and $I_N$ space these properties are highly correlated we can define an optimal rotation of the photometric axes that makes much of this information orthogonal. Fitting the observed spectroscopic redshifts with a quadratic function of the four magnitudes we show that redshifts for galaxies can be estimated to an accuracy better than $\Delta z =0.05$. This dispersion is due to the photometric uncertainties within the photographic data. Assuming no galaxy evolution we derive a set of simulated galaxy fluxes in the U, J, F and N passbands. Using these data we investigate how the redshift is encoded within the broadband magnitudes and the intrinsic dispersion of the photometric-redshift relation. We find that the signal that defines a galaxy's photometric redshift is not related to specific absorption or emission lines but comes from the break in the overall shape of the galaxy continuum at around 4000 \AA. Using high signal-to-noise photometric data we estimate that it is possible to achieve an intrinsic dispersion of less than $\Delta z =0.02$.
  • Classification of galaxy spectral energy distributions in terms of orthogonal basis functions provides an objective means of estimating the number of significant spectral components that comprise a particular galaxy type. We apply the Karhunen-Lo\`{e}ve transform to derive a spectral eigensystem from a sample of ten galaxy spectral energy distributions. These spectra cover a wavelength range of 1200 \AA\ to 1 $\mu$m and galaxy morphologies from elliptical to starburst. We find that the distribution of spectral types can be fully described by the first two eigenvectors (or eigenspectra). The derived eigenbasis is affected by the normalization of the original spectral energy distributions. We investigate different normalization and weighting schemes, including weighting to the same bolometric magnitude and weighting by the observed distribution of morphological types. Projecting the spectral energy distributions on to their eigenspectra we find that the coefficients define a simple spectral classification scheme. The galaxy spectral types can then be described in terms of a one parameter family (the angle in the plane of the first two eigenvectors). We find a strong correlation in the mean between our spectral classifications and those determined from published morphological classifications.