• We report the first scientific results from the NELIOTA (NEO Lunar Impacts and Optical TrAnsients) project, which has recently begun lunar monitoring observations with the 1.2-m Kryoneri telescope. NELIOTA aims to detect faint impact flashes produced by near-Earth meteoroids and asteroids and thereby help constrain the size-frequency distribution of near-Earth objects in the decimeter to meter range. The NELIOTA setup, consisting of two fast-frame cameras observing simultaneously in the $R$ and $I-$bands, enables - for the first time - direct analytical calculation of the flash temperatures. We present the first 10 flashes detected, for which we find temperatures in the range ~1,600-3,100 K, in agreement with theoretical values. Two of these flashes were detected on multiple frames in both filters and therefore yield the first measurements of the temperature drop for lunar flashes. In addition, we compute the impactor masses, which range between ~100 g and ~50 kg.
  • The evolution of massive stars surviving the red supergiant (RSG) stage remains unexplored due to the rarity of such objects. The yellow hypergiants (YHGs) appear to be the warm counterparts of post-RSG classes located near the Humphreys-Davidson upper luminosity limit, which are characterized by atmospheric instability and high mass-loss rates. We aim to increase the number of YHGs in M33 and thus to contribute to a better understanding of the pre-supernova evolution of massive stars. Optical spectroscopy of five dust-enshrouded YSGs selected from mid-IR criteria was obtained with the goal of detecting evidence of extensive atmospheres. We also analyzed BVI photometry for 21 of the most luminous YSGs in M33 to identify changes in the spectral type. To explore the properties of circumstellar dust, we performed SED-fitting of multi-band photometry of the 21 YSGs. We find three luminous YSGs in our sample to be YHG candidates, as they are surrounded by hot dust and are enshrouded within extended, cold dusty envelopes. Our spectroscopy of star 2 shows emission of more than one H$\alpha$ component, as well as emission of CaII, implying an extended atmospheric structure. In addition, the long-term monitoring of the star reveals a dimming in the visual light curve of amplitude larger than 0.5 mag that caused an apparent drop in the temperature that exceeded 500 K. We suggest the observed variability to be analogous to that of the Galactic YHG $\rho$ Cas. Five less luminous YSGs are suggested as post-RSG candidates showing evidence of hot or/and cool dust emission. We demonstrate that mid-IR photometry, combined with optical spectroscopy and time-series photometry, provide a robust method for identifying candidate YHGs. Future discovery of YHGs in Local Group galaxies is critical for the study of the late evolution of intermediate-mass massive stars.
  • We present results of high-cadence monitoring of the optical light curve of the nearby, Type Ia SN 2014J in M82 using the 2.3m Aristarchos telescope. $B$ and $V$-band photometry on days 15-18 after $t_{max}(B)$, obtained with a cadence of 2 min per band, reveals evidence for rapid variability at the 0.02-0.05 mag level on timescales of 15-60 min on all four nights, taking the red noise estimation at face value. The decline slope was measured to be steeper in the $B$-band than in $V$-band, and to steadily decrease in both bands from 0.15 mag/day (night 1) to 0.04 mag/day (night 4) in V and from 0.19 mag/day (night 1) to 0.06 mag/day (night 4) in B, corresponding to the onset of the secondary maximum. We propose that rapid variability could be due to one or a combination of the following scenarios: the clumpiness of the ejecta, their interaction with circumstellar material, the asymmetry of the explosion, or the mechanism causing the secondary maximum in the near-infrared light curve. We encourage the community to undertake high-cadence monitoring of future, nearby and bright supernovae to investigate the intraday behavior of their light curves.
  • NELIOTA is a new ESA activity launched at the National Observatory of Athens in February 2015 aiming to determine the distribution and frequency of small near-earth objects (NEOs) via lunar monitoring. The project involves upgrading the 1.2m Kryoneri telescope at the National Observatory of Athens, procuring two fast-frame cameras, and developing a software system, which will control the telescope and the cameras, process the images and automatically detect NEO impacts. NELIOTA will provide a web-based user interface, where the impact events will be reported and made available to the scientific community and the general public. The objective of this 3.5 year activity is to design, develop and implement a highly automated lunar monitoring system, which will conduct an observing campaign for 2 years in search of NEO impact flashes on the Moon. The impact events will be verified, characterised and reported. The 1.2m telescope will be capable of detecting flashes much fainter than current, small-aperture, lunar monitoring telescopes. NELIOTA is therefore expected to characterise the frequency and distribution of NEOs weighing as little as a few grams.
  • We investigate the characteristics of two newly discovered short-period, double-lined, massive binary systems, VFTS 450 (O9.7$\;$II--Ib$\,$+$\,$O7::) and VFTS 652 (B1$\;$Ib$\,+\,$O9:$\;$III:). We perform model-atmosphere analyses to characterise the photospheric properties of both members of each binary (denoting the `primary' as the spectroscopically more conspicuous component). Radial velocities and optical photometry are used to estimate the binary-system parameters. We estimate $T_{\rm eff}=27$ kK, $\log{(g)}=2.9$ (cgs) for the VFTS 450 primary spectrum (34kK, 3.6: for the secondary spectrum); and $T_{\rm eff} = 22$kK, $\log{(g)}=2.8$ for the VFTS 652 primary spectrum (35kK, 3.7: for the secondary spectrum). Both primaries show surface nitrogen enrichments (of more than 1 dex for VFTS 652), and probable moderate oxygen depletions relative to reference LMC abundances. We determine orbital periods of 6.89d and 8.59d for VFTS 450 and VFTS 652, respectively, and argue that the primaries must be close to filling their Roche lobes. Supposing this to be the case, we estimate component masses in the range $\sim$20--50M$_\odot$. The secondary spectra are associated with the more massive components, suggesting that both systems are high-mass analogues of classical Algol systems, undergoing case-A mass transfer. Difficulties in reconciling the spectroscopic analyses with the light-curves and with evolutionary considerations suggest that the secondary spectra are contaminated by (or arise in) accretion disks.
  • We present a study of the properties of the O-type, massive eclipsing binary 2MASS J13130841-6239275 located in the outskirts of the Danks 2 cluster in the G305 star-forming complex, using near-infrared spectroscopy from VLT/ISAAC. We derive the masses and radii to be 24.5$\pm$0.9 M$_{\odot}$ and 9.2$\pm$0.1 R$_{\odot}$ for the primary and 21.7$\pm$0.8 M$_{\odot}$ and 8.7$\pm$0.1 R$_{\odot}$ for the secondary component. In addition, we evaluate the sensitivity of our parameters to the choice of the spectral features used to determine the radial velocities. Both components appear to be main-sequence O6.5$-$O7 type stars at an age of $\sim$5 Myr, which is in agreement with the age of the cluster. A high visual extinction of A$_{5495}$=11.9$\pm$0.1 mag is reported, which is likely attributed to the cold molecular gas contaminating the north-east region of the cluster. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the system to the available $BVI_{c}JHK_{s}$ photometry, we determine a distance to the system of 3.52$\pm$0.08 kpc with a precision of 2$\%$, which is the most well-determined distance to the Danks 2 cluster and the host complex reported in the literature.
  • We present a variability study of 4646 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with known spectral types from the catalog of Bonanos et al. (2010) using the light curves from the OGLE-III database. The goal is to exploit the time domain information available through OGLE-III to gain insight into the processes that govern the evolution of massive stars. This variability survey of massive stars with known spectral types is larger than any previous survey by a factor of 7. We find that 60% of our sample (2766 stars) show no significant variability and 40% (1880 stars) exhibit variability distributed as follows: 807 stars display low-amplitude stochastic variability with fluctuations in I-band of up to 0.05 mag, 443 stars present irregular variability of higher amplitude (76% of these are reported as variables for the first time), 205 are eclipsing binaries (including 101 newly discovered systems), 50 are candidate rotating variables, 126 are classical Cepheids, 188 stars exhibit short-term sinusoidal periodicity (P < 3 days) making them candidate "slowly pulsating B stars" and non-radial Be pulsators, and 61 periodic stars exhibit longer periods. We demonstrate the wealth of information provided in the time domain, by doubling the number of known massive eclipsing binary systems and identifying 189 new candidate early-type Be and 20 Oe stars in the SMC. In addition, we find that ~80% of Be stars are photometrically variable in the OGLE-III time domain and provide evidence that short-term pulsating stars with additional photometric variability are rotating close to their break-up velocity.
  • We present preliminary results of the first near-infrared variability study of the Arches cluster, using adaptive optics data from NIRI/Gemini and NACO/VLT. The goal is to discover eclipsing binaries in this young (2.5 $\pm$ 0.5 Myr), dense, massive cluster for which we will determine accurate fundamental parameters with subsequent spectroscopy. Given that the Arches cluster contains more than 200 Wolf-Rayet and O-type stars, it provides a rare opportunity to determine parameters for some of the most massive stars in the Galaxy.
  • We present fundamental parameters of 4 massive eclipsing binaries in the young massive cluster Westerlund 1. The goal is to measure accurate masses and radii of their component stars, which provide much needed constraints for evolutionary models of massive stars. Accurate parameters can further be used to determine a dynamical lower limit for the magnetar progenitor and to obtain an independent distance to the cluster. Our results confirm and extend the evidence for a high mass for the progenitor of the magnetar.
  • We present results of our study of the infrared properties of massive stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, which are based on the Spitzer SAGE surveys of these galaxies. We have compiled catalogs of spectroscopically confirmed massive stars in each galaxy, as well as photometric catalogs for a subset of these stars that have infrared counterparts in the SAGE database, with uniform photometry from 0.3 to 24 microns in the UBVIJHKs+IRAC+MIPS24 bands. These catalogs enable a comparative study of infrared excesses of OB stars, classical Be stars, yellow and red supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars, Luminous Blue Variables and supergiant B[e] stars, as a function of metallicity, and provide the first roadmaps for interpreting luminous, massive, resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies at infrared wavelengths.
  • We present a study of the infrared properties of 4922 spectroscopically confirmed massive stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, focusing on the active OB star population. Besides OB stars, our sample includes yellow and red supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and supergiant B[e] stars. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in the SMC, respectively, when compared to the LMC, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We also find photometric variability among the active OB population and evidence for transitions of Be stars to B stars and vice versa. We furthermore confirm the presence of dust around all the supergiant B[e] stars in our sample, finding the shape of their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to be very similar, in contrast to the variety of SED shapes among the spectrally variable LBVs.
  • We present preliminary results of the first near-infrared variability study of the Arches cluster, using adaptive optics data from NIRI/Gemini and NACO/VLT. The goal is to discover eclipsing binaries in this young (2.5 +- 0.5 Myr), dense, massive cluster for which we will determine accurate fundamental parameters with subsequent spectroscopy. Given that the Arches cluster contains more than 200 Wolf-Rayet and O-type stars, it provides a rare opportunity to determine parameters for some of the most massive stars in the Galaxy.
  • Westerlund 1 is one of the most massive young clusters known in the Local Group, with an age of 3-5 Myr. It contains an assortment of rare evolved massive stars, such as blue, yellow and red supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars, a luminous blue variable, and a magnetar, as well as 4 massive eclipsing binary systems (Wddeb, Wd13, Wd36, WR77o, see Bonanos 2007). The eclipsing binaries present a rare opportunity to constrain evolutionary models of massive stars, the distance to the cluster and furthermore, to determine a dynamical lower limit for the mass of a magnetar progenitor. Wddeb, being a detached system, is of great interest as it allows determination of the masses of 2 of the most massive unevolved stars in the cluster. We have analyzed spectra of all 4 eclipsing binaries, taken in 2007-2008 with the 6.5 meter Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and present fundamental parameters (masses, radii) for their component stars.
  • We present a catalog of 5324 massive stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), with accurate spectral types compiled from the literature, and a photometric catalog for a subset of 3654 of these stars, with the goal of exploring their infrared properties. The photometric catalog consists of stars with infrared counterparts in the Spitzer, SAGE-SMC survey database, for which we present uniform photometry from 0.3-24 um in the UBVIJHKs+IRAC+MIPS24 bands. We compare the color magnitude diagrams and color-color diagrams to those of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), finding that the brightest infrared sources in the SMC are also the red supergiants, supergiant B[e] (sgB[e]) stars, luminous blue variables, and Wolf-Rayet stars, with the latter exhibiting less infrared excess, the red supergiants being less dusty and the sgB[e] stars being on average less luminous. Among the objects detected at 24 um are a few very luminous hypergiants, 4 B-type stars with peculiar, flat spectral energy distributions, and all 3 known luminous blue variables. We detect a distinct Be star sequence, displaced to the red, and suggest a novel method of confirming Be star candidates photometrically. We find a higher fraction of Oe and Be stars among O and early-B stars in the SMC, respectively, when compared to the LMC, and that the SMC Be stars occur at higher luminosities. We estimate mass-loss rates for the red supergiants, confirming the correlation with luminosity even at the metallicity of the SMC. Finally, we confirm the new class of stars displaying composite A & F type spectra, the sgB[e] nature of 2dFS1804 and find the F0 supergiant 2dFS3528 to be a candidate luminous blue variable with cold dust.
  • In the last decade, over 7000 eclipsing binaries have been discovered in the Local Group through various variability surveys. Measuring fundamental parameters of these eclipsing binaries has become feasible with 8 meter class telescopes, making it possible to use eclipsing binaries as distance indicators. Distances with eclipsing binaries provide an independent method for calibrating the extragalactic distance scale and thus determining the Hubble constant. This method has been used for determining distances to eclipsing binaries in the Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda Galaxy and most recently to a detached eclipsing binary in the Triangulum Galaxy by the DIRECT Project. The increasing number of eclipsing binaries found by microlensing and variability surveys also provide a rich database for advancing our understanding of star formation and evolution.
  • We present near-infrared $JHK_s$ photometry and light curves of the candidate magnetic white dwarf+brown dwarf binary SDSS J121209.31+013627.7 and report on the detection of near-infrared excess and variability in the $K_s-$band. The observed near-infrared excess can be explained by the presence of an L7 brown dwarf and an extra emission source. The $J$ and $H$ light curves appear flat, which rules out eclipses deeper than 0.2 mag and the presence of an accretion hot spot on the white dwarf. From the variable $K_s$ lightcurve, we get a refined period for the system of 88$\pm$1 minutes. We show that the observed variability in $K_s-$band can be explained by cyclotron emission, which can be modeled by a small spot on the surface of the white dwarf. SDSS 1212 exhibits similarities to the ultra-short period polar EF Eridani, however the lack of evidence for Roche-lobe overflow accretion suggests it may be a pre-polar.