• We report tentative evidence for a cold stellar stream in the ultra-diffuse galaxy NGC1052-DF2. If confirmed, this stream (which we refer to as "The Maybe Stream") would be the first cold stellar stream detected outside of the Local Group. The candidate stream is very narrow and has an unusual and highly curved shape.
  • The origin of ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs), a class of compact stellar systems discovered two decades ago, still remains a matter of debate. Recent discoveries of central supermassive black holes in UCDs likely inherited from their massive progenitor galaxies provide support for the tidal stripping hypothesis. At the same time, on statistical grounds, some massive UCDs might be representatives of the high luminosity tail of the globular cluster luminosity function. Here we present a detection of a $3.3^{+1.4}_{-1.2}\times10^6\,M_{\odot}$ black hole ($1\sigma$ uncertainty) in the centre of the UCD3 galaxy in the Fornax cluster, that corresponds to 4 per cent of its stellar mass. We performed isotropic Jeans dynamical modelling of UCD3 using internal kinematics derived from adaptive optics assisted observations with the SINFONI spectrograph and seeing limited data collected with the FLAMES spectrograph at the ESO VLT. We rule out the zero black hole mass at the $3\sigma$ confidence level when adopting a mass-to-light ratio inferred from stellar populations. This is the fourth supermassive black hole found in a UCD and the first one in the Fornax cluster. Similarly to other known UCDs that harbour black holes, UCD3 hosts metal rich stars enhanced in $\alpha$-elements that supports the tidal stripping of a massive progenitor as its likely formation scenario. We estimate that up to 80 per cent of luminous UCDs in galaxy clusters host central black holes. This fraction should be lower for UCDs in groups, because their progenitors are more likely to be dwarf galaxies, which do not tend to host central black holes.
  • We examine the internal properties of the most massive ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD), M59-UCD3, by combining adaptive optics assisted near-IR integral field spectroscopy from Gemini/NIFS, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging. We use the multi-band HST imaging to create a mass model that suggests and accounts for the presence of multiple stellar populations and structural components. We combine these mass models with kinematics measurements from Gemini/NIFS to find a best-fit stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) and black hole (BH) mass using Jeans Anisotropic Models (JAM), axisymmetric Schwarzschild models, and triaxial Schwarzschild models. The best fit parameters in the JAM and axisymmetric Schwarzschild models have black holes between 2.5 and 5.9 million solar masses. The triaxial Schwarzschild models point toward a similar BH mass, but show a minimum $\chi^2$ at a BH mass of $\sim 0$. Models with a BH in all three techniques provide better fits to the central $V_{rms}$ profiles, and thus we estimate the BH mass to be $4.2^{+2.1}_{-1.7} \times 10^{6}$ M$_\odot$ (estimated 1$\sigma$ uncertainties). We also present deep radio imaging of M59-UCD3 and two other UCDs in Virgo with dynamical BH mass measurements, and compare these to X-ray measurements to check for consistency with the fundamental plane of BH accretion. We detect faint radio emission in M59cO, but find only upper limits for M60-UCD1 and M59-UCD3 despite X-ray detections in both these sources. The BH mass and nuclear light profile of M59-UCD3 suggests it is the tidally stripped remnant of a $\sim$10$^{9-10}$ M$_\odot$ galaxy.
  • Studies of galaxy surveys in the context of the cold dark matter paradigm have shown that the mass of the dark matter halo and the total stellar mass are coupled through a function that varies smoothly with mass. Their average ratio M_{halo}/M_{stars} has a minimum of about 30 for galaxies with stellar masses near that of the Milky Way (approximately 5x10^{10} solar masses) and increases both towards lower masses and towards higher masses. The scatter in this relation is not well known; it is generally thought to be less than a factor of two for massive galaxies but much larger for dwarf galaxies. Here we report the radial velocities of ten luminous globular-cluster-like objects in the ultra-diffuse galaxy NGC1052-DF2, which has a stellar mass of approximately 2x10^8 solar masses. We infer that its velocity dispersion is less than 10.5 kilometers per second with 90 per cent confidence, and we determine from this that its total mass within a radius of 7.6 kiloparsecs is less than 3.4x10^8 solar masses. This implies that the ratio M_{halo}/M_{stars} is of order unity (and consistent with zero), a factor of at least 400 lower than expected. NGC1052-DF2 demonstrates that dark matter is not always coupled with baryonic matter on galactic scales.
  • We recently found an ultra diffuse galaxy (UDG) with a half-light radius of R_e = 2.2 kpc and little or no dark matter. The total mass of NGC1052-DF2 was measured from the radial velocities of bright compact objects that are associated with the galaxy. Here we analyze these objects using a combination of HST imaging and Keck spectroscopy. Their average size is <r_h> = 6.2+-0.5 pc and their average ellipticity is <{\epsilon}> = 0.18+-0.02. From a stacked Keck spectrum we derive an age >9 Gyr and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.35+-0.12. Their properties are similar to {\omega} Centauri, the brightest and largest globular cluster in the Milky Way, and our results demonstrate that the luminosity function of metal-poor globular clusters is not universal. The fraction of the total stellar mass that is in the globular cluster system is similar to that in other UDGs, and consistent with "failed galaxy" scenarios where star formation terminated shortly after the clusters were formed. However, the galaxy is a factor of ~1000 removed from the relation between globular cluster mass and total galaxy mass that has been found for other galaxies, including other UDGs. We infer that a dark matter halo is not a prerequisite for the formation of metal-poor globular cluster-like objects in high redshift galaxies.
  • The recent discovery of massive black holes (BHs) in the centers of high-mass ultra compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) suggests that at least some are the stripped nuclear star clusters of dwarf galaxies. We present the first study that investigates whether such massive BHs, and therefore stripped nuclei, also exist in low-mass ($M<10^{7}M_{\odot}$) UCDs. We constrain the BH masses of two UCDs located in Centaurus A (UCD320 and UCD330) using Jeans modeling of the resolved stellar kinematics from adaptive optics VLT/SINFONI data. No massive BHs are found in either UCD. We find a $3\,\sigma$ upper limit on the central BH mass in UCD\,330 of $M_{\bullet}<1.0\times10^{5}M_{\odot}$, which corresponds to 1.7\% of the total mass. This excludes a high mass fraction BH and would only allow a low-mass BHs similar to those claimed to be detected in Local Group GCs. For UCD320, poorer data quality results in a less constraining $3\,\sigma$ upper limit of $M_{\bullet}<1\times10^{6}M_{\odot}$, which is equal to 37.7\% of the total mass. The dynamical $M/L$ of UCD320 and UCD330 are not inflated compared to predictions from stellar population models. The non-detection of BHs in these low-mass UCDs is consistent with the idea that elevated dynamical $M/L$s do indicate the presence of a substantial BH. Despite not detecting massive BHs, these systems could still be stripped nuclei. The strong rotation ($v/\sigma$ of 0.3 to 0.4) in both UCDs and the two-component light profile in UCD330 support the idea that these UCDs may be stripped nuclei of low-mass galaxies where the BH occupation fraction is not yet known.
  • We apply the Jeans Anisotropic MGE (JAM) dynamical modelling method to SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey data of early-type galaxies in the stellar mass range $10^{10}<M_*/{\rm M}_{\odot}<10^{11.6}$ that cover a large radial range of $0.1-4.0$ effective radii. We combine SLUGGS and ATLAS$^{\rm 3D}$ datasets to model the total-mass profiles of a sample of 21 fast-rotator galaxies, utilising a hyperparameter method to combine the two independent datasets. The total-mass density profile slope values derived for these galaxies are consistent with those measured in the inner regions of galaxies by other studies. Furthermore, the total-mass density slopes ($\gamma_{\rm tot}$) appear to be universal over this broad stellar mass range, with an average value of $\gamma_{\rm tot}=-2.24\,\pm\,0.05$, i.e. slightly steeper than isothermal. We compare our results to model galaxies from the Magneticum and EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, in order to probe the mechanisms that are responsible for varying total-mass density profile slopes. The simulated-galaxy slopes are shallower than the observed values by $\sim0.3-0.5$, indicating that the physical processes shaping the mass distributions of galaxies in cosmological simulations are still incomplete. For galaxies with $M_*>10^{10.7}{\rm M}_{\odot}$ in the Magneticum simulations, we identify a significant anticorrelation between total-mass density profile slopes and the fraction of stellar mass formed ex situ (i.e. accreted), whereas this anticorrelation is weaker for lower stellar masses, implying that the measured total mass density slopes for low-mass galaxies are less likely to be determined by merger activity.
  • We use Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to confirm the cluster membership of 16 ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Coma cluster, bringing the total number of spectroscopically con- firmed UDGs to 24. We also identify a new cluster background UDG. In this pilot study of Coma UDGs in velocity phase-space, we find evidence that most present-day Coma UDGs have a recent infall epoch while a few may be ancient infalls. These recent infall UDGs have higher absolute relative line-of-sight velocities, bluer optical colors, and are smaller in size, unlike the ancient infalls. The kinematics of the spectroscopically confirmed Coma UDG sample is similar to that of the cluster late-type galaxy population. Our velocity phase-space analysis suggests that present-day cluster UDGs have a predominantly accretion origin from the field, acquire velocities corresponding to the mass of the cluster at accretion as they are accelerated towards the cluster center, and become redder and bigger as they experience the various physical processes at work within the cluster.
  • In this second paper of the series we study, with new Keck/DEIMOS spectra, the stellar populations of 7 spectroscopically confirmed ultra--diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Coma cluster. We find typically intermediate to old ages (~7Gyr), low metallicities ([Z/H]~ -0.7dex) and slightly super-solar abundance patterns ([Mg/Fe] ~ +0.16dex). These properties are similar to those of dwarf galaxies inhabiting the same area in the cluster and are mostly consistent with being the continuity of the stellar mass scaling relations of more massive galaxies. These UDGs' star formation histories imply a relatively recent infall into the Coma cluster, consistent with the theoretical predictions for a dwarf-like origin. However, considering the scatter in the resulting properties and including other UDGs in Coma, together with the results from the velocity phase-space study of the Paper I in this series, a mixed-bag of origins is needed to explain the nature of all UDGs. Our results thus reinforce a scenario in which most of the UDGs are field dwarf galaxies that become quenched through their later infall in cluster environments, whereas some other UDGs are genuine primordial galaxies that failed to develop due to an early quenching phase. The unknown proportion of dwarf-like to primordial-like UDGs leaves the enigma of the nature of UDGs still open.
  • We estimate the cosmic number density of the recently identified class of HI-bearing ultra-diffuse sources (HUDs) based on the completeness limits of the ALFALFA survey. These objects fall in the range $8.5 < \log M_{\rm{HI}}/\rm{M_{\odot}} < 9.5$, have average $r$-band surface brightnesses fainter than 24 mag arsec$^{-2}$, half-light radii greater than 1.5 kpc, and are separated from neighbours by at least 350 kpc. We find that HUDs contribute at most 6% of the population of HI-bearing dwarfs, have a total cosmic number density of $(1.5 \pm 0.6) \times 10^{-3}$ $\rm{Mpc^{-3}}$, and an HI mass density of $(6.0 \pm 0.8) \times 10^{5}$ $\rm{M_{\odot}\,Mpc^{-3}}$. We estimate that this is similar to the total cosmic number density of UDGs in groups and clusters, and conclude that the relation between the number of UDGs hosted in a halo and the halo mass, must have a break below $M_{200} \sim 10^{12}$ $\rm{M_{\odot}}$ in order to account for the abundance of HUDs. The distribution of the velocity widths of HUDs rises steeply towards low values, indicating a preference for slow rotation rates. These objects have been absent from measurements of the galaxy stellar mass function owing to their low surface brightness. However, we estimate that due to their low number density, their inclusion would constitute a correction of less than 1%. Comparison with the Santa Cruz SAM shows that it produces HI-rich central UDGs that have similar colours to HUDs, but these are currently produced in much great a number. While previous results from this sample have favoured formation scenarios where HUDs form in high spin parameter halos, comparisons with the results of Rong et al. 2017, which invokes that formation mechanism, reveal that this model produces an order of magnitude more field UDGs than we observe in the HUD population.(Abridged)
  • Super-massive black holes, with masses larger than a million times that of the Sun, appear to inhabit the centers of all massive galaxies. Cosmologically-motivated theories of galaxy formation need feedback from these super-massive black holes to regulate star formation. In the absence of such feedback, state-of-the-art numerical simulations dramatically fail to reproduce the number density and properties of massive galaxies in the local Universe. However, there is no observational evidence of this strongly coupled co-evolution between super-massive black holes and star formation, impeding our understanding of baryonic processes within galaxies. Here we show that the star formation histories (SFHs) of nearby massive galaxies, as measured from their integrated optical spectra, depend on the mass of the central super-massive black hole. Our results suggest that black hole mass growth scales with gas cooling rate in the early Universe. The subsequent quenching of star formation takes place earlier and more efficiently in galaxies hosting more massive central black holes. The observed relation between black hole mass and star formation efficiency applies to all generations of stars formed throughout a galaxy's life, revealing a continuous interplay between black hole activity and baryon cooling.
  • We present deep, wide-field Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam photometry of two recently discovered satellites of the Milky Way (MW): Columba I and Triangulum II. The color magnitude diagrams of both objects point to exclusively old and metal-poor stellar populations. We re-derive structural parameters and luminosities of these satellites, and find $M_{\rm V, Col~I} = -4.2\pm0.2$ for Col I and $M_{\rm V, Tri~II} = -1.2\pm0.4$ for Tri II, with corresponding half-light radii of $r_{\rm h, Col~I} = 117\pm17$ pc and $r_{\rm h, Tri~II} = 21\pm4$ pc. The properties of both systems are consistent with observed scaling relations for MW dwarf galaxies. Based on archival data, we derive upper limits on the neutral gas content of these dwarfs, and find that they lack HI, as do the majority of observed satellites within the MW virial radius. Neither satellite shows evidence of tidal stripping in the form of extensions or distortions in matched-filter stellar density maps or surface density profiles. However, the smaller Tri II system is relatively metal-rich for its luminosity (compared to other MW satellites), possibly because it has been tidally stripped. Through a suite of orbit simulations, we show that Tri II is approaching pericenter of its eccentric orbit, a stage at which tidal debris is unlikely to be seen. In addition, we find that Tri II may be on its first infall into the MW, which helps explain its unique properties among MW dwarfs. Further evidence that Tri II is likely an ultra-faint dwarf comes from its stellar mass function, which is similar to those of other MW dwarfs.
  • In order to investigate the formation mechanisms of the rare compact elliptical galaxies (cE) we have compiled a sample of 25 cEs with good SDSS spectra, covering a range of stellar masses, sizes and environments. They have been visually classified according to the interaction with their host, representing different evolutionary stages. We have included clearly disrupted galaxies, galaxies that despite not showing signs of interaction are located close to a massive neighbor (thus are good candidates for a stripping process), and cEs with no host nearby. For the latter, tidal stripping is less likely to have happened and instead they could simply represent the very low-mass, faint end of the ellipticals. We study a set of properties (structural parameters, stellar populations, star formation histories and mass ratios) that can be used to discriminate between an intrinsic or stripped origin. We find that one diagnostic tool alone is inconclusive for the majority of objects. However, if we combine all the tools a clear picture emerges. The most plausible origin, as well as the evolutionary stage and progenitor type, can be then determined. Our results favor the stripping mechanism for those galaxies in groups and clusters that have a plausible host nearby, but favors an intrinsic origin for those rare cEs without a plausible host and that are located in looser environments.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of two ultra diffuse galaxies (UDGs) with measured stellar velocity dispersions in the Coma cluster. The galaxies, Dragonfly 44 and DFX1, have effective radii of 4.7 kpc and 3.5 kpc and velocity dispersions of $47^{+8}_{-6}$ km/s and $30^{+7}_{-7}$ km/s, respectively. Both galaxies are associated with a striking number of compact objects, tentatively identified as globular clusters: $N_{\rm gc}=74\pm 18$ for Dragonfly 44 and $N_{\rm gc}=62\pm 17$ for DFX1. The number of globular clusters is far higher than expected from the luminosities of the galaxies but is consistent with expectations from the empirical relation between dynamical mass and globular cluster count defined by other galaxies. Combining our data for these two objects with previous HST observations of Coma UDGs we find that UDGs have a factor of $6.9^{+1.0}_{-2.4}$ more globular clusters than other galaxies of the same luminosity, in contrast to a recent study of a similar sample by Amorisco et al. (2017), but consistent with earlier results for individual galaxies. The Harris et al. (2017) relation between globular cluster count and dark matter halo mass implies a median halo mass of $M_{\rm halo}\sim 1.5\times 10^{11}\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$ for the sixteen Coma UDGs that have been observed with HST so far, with the largest and brightest having $M_{\rm halo}\sim 5\times 10^{11}\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$.
  • We present results of a joint \textit{Chandra}/\textit{XMM-Newton} analysis of the early-type galaxies NGC 4649 and NGC 5846 aimed at investigating differences between mass profiles derived from X-ray data and those from optical data, to probe the state of the hot ISM in these galaxies. If the hot ISM is at a given radius in hydrostatic equilibrium (HE) the X-ray data can be used to measure the total enclosed mass of the galaxy. Differences from optically-derived mass distributions therefore yield information about departures from HE in the hot halos. The X-ray mass profiles in different angular sectors of NGC 4649 are generally smooth with no significant azimuthal asymmetries within \(12\) kpc. Extrapolation of these profiles beyond this scale yields results consistent with the optical estimate. However, in the central region (\(r < 3\) kpc) the X-ray data underpredict the enclosed mass, when compared with the optical mass profiles. Consistent with previous results we estimate a non-thermal pressure component accounting for \(30\%\) of the gas pressure, likely linked to nuclear activity. In NGC 5846 the X-ray mass profiles show significant azimuthal asymmetries, especially in the NE direction. Comparison with optical mass profiles in this direction suggests significant departures from HE, consistent with bulk gas compression and decompression due to sloshing on \(\sim 15\) kpc scales; this effect disappears in the NW direction where the emission is smooth and extended. In this sector we find consistent X-ray and optical mass profiles, suggesting that the hot halo is not responding to strong non-gravitational forces.
  • We present radial tracks for four early-type galaxies with embedded intermediate-scale discs in a modified spin-ellipticity diagram. Here, each galaxy's spin and ellipticity profiles are shown as a radial track, as opposed to a single, flux-weighted aperture-dependent value as is common in the literature. The use of a single ellipticity and spin parameter is inadequate to capture the basic nature of these galaxies, which transition from fast to slow rotation as one moves to larger radii where the disc ceases to dominate. After peaking, the four galaxy's radial tracks feature a downturn in both ellipticity and spin with increasing radius, differentiating them from elliptical galaxies, and from lenticular galaxies whose discs dominate at large radii. These galaxies are examples of so-called discy elliptical galaxies, which are a morphological hybrid between elliptical (E) and lenticular (S0) galaxies, and have been designated ES galaxies. The use of spin-ellipticity tracks provides extra structural information about individual galaxies over a single aperture measure. Such tracks provide a key diagnostic for classifying early-type galaxies, particularly in the era of 2D kinematic (and photometric) data beyond one effective radius.
  • We use globular cluster kinematics data, primarily from the SLUGGS survey, to measure the dark matter fraction ($f_{\rm DM}$) and the average dark matter density ($\left< \rho_{\rm DM} \right>$) within the inner 5 effective radii ($R_{\rm e}$) for 32 nearby early--type galaxies (ETGs) with stellar mass log $(M_*/\rm M_\odot)$ ranging from $10.1$ to $11.8$. We compare our results with a simple galaxy model based on scaling relations as well as with cosmological hydrodynamical simulations where the dark matter profile has been modified through various physical processes. We find a high $f_{\rm DM}$ ($\geq0.6$) within 5~$R_{\rm e}$ in most of our sample, which we interpret as a signature of a late mass assembly history that is largely devoid of gas-rich major mergers. However, around log $(M_*/M_\odot) \sim 11$, there is a wide range of $f_{\rm DM}$ which may be challenging to explain with any single cosmological model. We find tentative evidence that lenticulars (S0s), unlike ellipticals, have mass distributions that are similar to spiral galaxies, with decreasing $f_{\rm DM}$ within 5~$R_{\rm e}$ as galaxy luminosity increases. However, we do not find any difference between the $\left< \rho_{\rm DM} \right>$ of S0s and ellipticals in our sample, despite the differences in their stellar populations. We have also used $\left< \rho_{\rm DM} \right>$ to infer the epoch of halo assembly ($z{\sim}2-4$). By comparing the age of their central stars with the inferred epoch of halo formation, we are able to gain more insight into their mass assembly histories. Our results suggest a fundamental difference in the dominant late-phase mass assembly channel between lenticulars and elliptical galaxies.
  • We present the detection of supermassive black holes (BHs) in two Virgo ultracompact dwarf galaxies (UCDs), VUCD3 and M59cO. We use adaptive optics assisted data from the Gemini/NIFS instrument to derive radial velocity dispersion profiles for both objects. Mass models for the two UCDs are created using multi-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, including the modeling of mild color gradients seen in both objects. We then find a best-fit stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) and BH mass by combining the kinematic data and the deprojected stellar mass profile using Jeans Anisotropic Models (JAM). Assuming axisymmetric isotropic Jeans models, we detect BHs in both objects with masses of $4.4^{+2.5}_{-3.0} \times 10^6$ $M_{\odot}$ in VUCD3 and $5.8^{+2.5}_{-2.8} \times 10^6$ $M_{\odot}$ in M59cO (3$\sigma$ uncertainties). The BH mass is degenerate with the anisotropy parameter, $\beta_z$; for the data to be consistent with no BH requires $\beta_z = 0.4$ and $\beta_z = 0.6$ for VUCD3 and M59cO, respectively. Comparing these values with nuclear star clusters shows that while it is possible that these UCDs are highly radially anisotropic, it seems unlikely. These detections constitute the second and third UCDs known to host supermassive BHs. They both have a high fraction of their total mass in their BH; $\sim$13% for VUCD3 and $\sim$18% for M59cO. They also have low best-fit stellar $M/L$s, supporting the proposed scenario that most massive UCDs host high mass fraction BHs. The properties of the BHs and UCDs are consistent with both objects being the tidally stripped remnants of $\sim$10$^9$ M$_\odot$ galaxies.
  • We utilise the DEIMOS instrument on the Keck telescope to measure the wide-field stellar kinematics of early-type galaxies as part of the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey. In this paper, we focus on some of the lowest stellar mass lenticular galaxies within this survey, namely NGC 2549, NGC 4474, NGC 4459 and NGC 7457, performing detailed kinematic analyses out to large radial distances of $\sim 2-3$ effective radii. For NGC 2549, we present the first analysis of data taken with the SuperSKiMS (Stellar Kinematics from Multiple Slits) technique. To better probe kinematic variations in the outskirts of the SLUGGS galaxies, we have defined a local measure of stellar spin. We use this parameter and identify a clear separation in the radial behaviour of stellar spin between lenticular and elliptical galaxies, thereby reinforcing the physically meaningful nature of their morphological classifications. We compare the kinematic properties of our galaxies with those from various simulated galaxies to extract plausible formation scenarios. By doing this for multiple simulations, we assess the consistency of the theoretical results. Comparisons to binary merger simulations show that low-mass lenticular galaxies generally resemble the spiral progenitors more than the merger remnants themselves, an indication that these galaxies are not formed through merger events. We find, however, that recent mergers cannot be ruled out for some lenticular galaxies.
  • Here we present positions and radial velocities for over 4000 globular clusters (GCs) in 27 nearby early-type galaxies from the SLUGGS survey. The SLUGGS survey is designed to be representative of elliptical and lenticular galaxies in the stellar mass range 10 $<$ log M$_{\ast}$/M$_{\odot}$ $<$ 11.7. The data have been obtained over many years, mostly using the very stable multi-object spectrograph DEIMOS on the Keck II 10m telescope. Radial velocities are measured using the calcium triplet lines with a velocity accuracy of $\pm$ 10-15 km/s. We use phase space diagrams (i.e. velocity--position diagrams) to identify contaminants such as foreground stars and background galaxies, and to show that the contribution of GCs from neighboring galaxies is generally insignificant. Likely ultra-compact dwarfs are tabulated separately. We find that the mean velocity of the GC system is close to that of the host galaxy systemic velocity, indicating that the GC system is in overall dynamical equilibrium within the galaxy potential. We also find that the GC system velocity dispersion scales with host galaxy stellar mass in a similar manner to the Faber-Jackson relation for the stellar velocity dispersion. Publication of these GC radial velocity catalogs should enable further studies in many areas, such as GC system substructure, kinematics, and host galaxy mass measurements.
  • We report the discovery of a large population of Ultra-diffuse Galaxies (UDGs) in the massive galaxy cluster Abell 2744 (z=0.308) as observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program. Since this cluster is ~5 times more massive than Coma, our observations allow us to extend 0.7 dex beyond the high-mass end of the relationship between UDG abundance and cluster mass reported by van der Burg et al. 2016. Using the same selection criteria as van der Burg et al. 2016, A2744 hosts an estimated 2133 +/- 613 UDGs, ten times the number in Coma. As noted by Lee & Jang 2016, A2744 contains numerous unresolved compact objects, which those authors identified predominantly as globular clusters. However, these objects have luminosities that are more consistent with ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies. The abundances of both UCDs and UDGs scale with cluster mass as a power law with a similar exponent, although UDGs and UCDs have very different radial distributions within the cluster. The radial surface density distribution of UCDs rises sharply toward the cluster centre, while the surface density distribution of the UDG population is essentially flat. Together, these observations hint at a picture where some UCDs in A2744 may have once been associated with infalling UDGs. As UDGs fall in and dissolve, they leave behind a residue of unbound ultra-compact dwarfs.
  • Galaxy starlight at 3.6$\mu$m is an excellent tracer of stellar mass. Here we use the latest 3.6$\mu$m imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope to measure the total stellar mass and effective radii in a homogeneous way for a sample of galaxies from the SLUGGS survey. These galaxies are representative of nearby early-type galaxies in the stellar mass range of 10 $<$ log M$_{\ast}$/M$_{\odot}$ $<$ 11.7, and our methodology can be applied to other samples of early-type galaxies. We model each galaxy in 2D and estimate its total asymptotic magnitude from a 1D curve-of-growth. Magnitudes are converted into stellar masses using a 3.6$\mu$m mass-to-light ratio from the latest stellar population models of R\"ock et al., assuming a Kroupa IMF. We apply a ratio based on each galaxy's mean mass-weighted stellar age within one effective radius (the mass-to-light ratio is insensitive to galaxy metallicity for the generally old stellar ages and high metallicities found in massive early-type galaxies). Our 3.6$\mu$m stellar masses agree well with masses derived from 2.2$\mu$m data. From the 1D surface brightness profile we fit a single Sersic law, excluding the very central regions. We measure the effective radius, Sersic n parameter and effective surface brightness for each galaxy. We find that galaxy sizes derived from shallow optical imaging and the 2MASS survey tend to underestimate the true size of the largest, most massive galaxies in our sample. We adopt the 3.6$\mu$m stellar masses and effective radii for the SLUGGS survey galaxies.
  • Coevolution between supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies is universally adopted in models for galaxy formation. In the absence of feedback from active galactic nuclei, simulated massive galaxies keep forming stars in the local Universe. From an observational point of view, however, such coevolution remains unclear. We present a stellar population analysis of galaxies with direct BH mass measurements and the BH mass-{\sigma} relation as a working framework. We find that over-massive BH galaxies, i.e., galaxies lying above the best-fitting BH mass-{\sigma} line, tend to be older and more {\alpha}-element enhanced than under-massive BH galaxies. The scatter in the BH mass-{\sigma}-[{\alpha}/Fe] plane is significantly lower than in the standard BH mass-{\sigma} relation. We interpret this trend as an imprint of active galactic nucleus feedback on the star formation histories of massive galaxies.
  • Here we utilise recent measures of galaxy total dynamical mass and X-ray gas luminosities (L$_{X,Gas}$) for a sample of 29 massive early-type galaxies from the SLUGGS survey to probe L$_{X,Gas}$--mass scaling relations. In particular, we investigate scalings with stellar mass, dynamical mass within 5 effective radii (R$_e$) and total virial mass. We also compare these relations with predictions from $\Lambda$CDM simulations. We find a strong linear relationship between L$_{X,Gas}$ and galaxy dynamical mass within 5 R$_e$, which is consistent with the recent cosmological simulations of Choi et al. that incorporate mechanical heating from AGN. We conclude that the gas surrounding massive early-type galaxies was shock heated as it fell into collapsing dark matter halos so that L$_{X,Gas}$ is primarily driven by the depth of a galaxy's potential well. Heating by an AGN plays an important secondary role in determining L$_{X,Gas}$.
  • We construct a suite of discrete chemo-dynamical models of the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5846. These models are a powerful tool to constrain both the mass distribution and internal dynamics of multiple tracer populations. We use Jeans models to simultaneously fit stellar kinematics within the effective radius $R_{\rm e}$, planetary nebula (PN) radial velocities out to $3\, R_{\rm e}$, and globular cluster (GC) radial velocities and colours out to $6\,R_{\rm e}$. The best-fitting model is a cored DM halo which contributes $\sim 10\%$ of the total mass within $1\,R_{\rm e}$, and $67\% \pm 10\%$ within $6\,R_{\rm e}$, although a cusped DM halo is also acceptable. The red GCs exhibit mild rotation with $v_{\rm max}/\sigma_0 \sim 0.3$ in the region $R > \,R_{\rm e}$, aligned with but counter-rotating to the stars in the inner parts, while the blue GCs and PNe kinematics are consistent with no rotation. The red GCs are tangentially anisotropic, the blue GCs are mildly radially anisotropic, and the PNe vary from radially to tangentially anisotropic from the inner to the outer region. This is confirmed by general made-to-measure models. The tangential anisotropy of the red GCs in the inner regions could stem from the preferential destruction of red GCs on more radial orbits, while their outer tangential anisotropy -- similar to the PNe in this region -- has no good explanation. The mild radial anisotropy of the blue GCs is consistent with an accretion scenario.