• In this paper, we report new limits on 21cm emission from cosmic reionization based on a 135-day observing campaign with a 64-element deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. This work extends the work presented in Parsons et al. (2014) with more collecting area, a longer observing period, improved redundancy-based calibration, optimal fringe-rate filtering, and improved power-spectral analysis using optimal quadratic estimators. The result is a new $2\sigma$ upper limit on $\Delta^{2}(k)$ of (22.4 mK)$^2$ in the range $0.15 < k < 0.5h\ {\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ at $z = 8.4$. This represents a three-fold improvement over the previous best upper limit. As we discuss in more depth in a forthcoming paper (Pober et al. 2015, in prep), this upper limit supports and extends previous evidence against extremely cold reionization scenarios. We conclude with a discussion of implications for future 21cm reionization experiments, including the newly funded Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA). $\textbf{The limits presented in this paper have been retracted: The erratum can be found in Appendix A.}$
  • 21 cm cosmology is a promising new probe of the evolution of visible matter in our universe, especially during the poorly-constrained Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization. However, in order to separate the 21 cm signal from bright astrophysical foregrounds, we need an exquisite understanding of our telescopes so as to avoid adding spectral structure to spectrally-smooth foregrounds. One powerful calibration method relies on repeated simultaneous measurements of the same interferometric baseline to solve for the sky signal and for instrumental parameters simultaneously. However, certain degrees of freedom are not constrained by asserting internal consistency between redundant measurements. In this paper, we review the origin of these "degeneracies" of redundant-baseline calibration and demonstrate how they can source unwanted spectral structure in our measurement and show how to eliminate that additional, artificial structure. We also generalize redundant calibration to dual-polarization instruments, derive the degeneracy structure, and explore the unique challenges to calibration and preserving spectral smoothness presented by a polarized measurement.
  • Radio interferometers designed to measure the cosmological 21 cm power spectrum require high sensitivity. Several modern low-frequency interferometers feature drift-scan antennas placed on a regular grid to maximize the number of instantaneously coherent (redundant) measurements. However, even for such maximum-redundancy arrays, significant sensitivity comes through partial coherence between baselines. Current visibility-based power-spectrum pipelines, though shown to ease control of systematics, lack the ability to make use of this partial redundancy. We introduce a method to leverage partial redundancy in such power-spectrum pipelines for drift-scan arrays. Our method cross-multiplies baseline pairs at a time lag and quantifies the sensitivity contributions of each pair of baselines. Using the configurations and beams of the 128-element Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER-128) and staged deployments of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, we illustrate how our method applies to different arrays and predict the sensitivity improvements associated with pairing partially coherent baselines. As the number of antennas increases, we find partial redundancy to be of increasing importance in unlocking the full sensitivity of upcoming arrays.
  • Foreground power dominates the measurements of interferometers that seek a statistical detection of highly-redshifted HI emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The inherent spectral smoothness of synchrotron radiation, the dominant foreground emission mechanism, and the chromaticity of the instrument allows these experiments to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth and structured emission in Fourier space (the "wedge" or "pitchfork", and the "EoR Window", respectively). Faraday rotation can inject spectral structure into otherwise smooth polarized foreground emission, which through instrument effects or miscalibration could possibly pollute the EoR Window. Using data from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) 19-element commissioning array, we investigate the polarization response of this new instrument in the power spectrum domain. We confirm the expected structure of foreground emission in Fourier space predicted by Thyagarajan et al. (2015a, 2016) for a HERA-type dish, and detect polarized power within the pitchfork. Using simulations of the polarized response of HERA feeds, we find that almost all of the power in Stokes Q, U and V can be attributed to instrumental leakage effects. Power consistent with noise in the EoR window suggests a negligible amount of spectrally-structured polarized power, to the noise-levels attained. This lends confidence to deep integrations with HERA in the future, but with a lower noise floor these future studies will also have to investigate their polarized response.
  • Current and upcoming radio interferometric experiments are aiming to make a statistical characterization of the high-redshift 21cm fluctuation signal spanning the hydrogen reionization and X-ray heating epochs of the universe. However, connecting 21cm statistics to underlying physical parameters is complicated by the theoretical challenge of modeling the relevant physics at computational speeds quick enough to enable exploration of the high dimensional and weakly constrained parameter space. In this work, we use machine learning algorithms to build a fast emulator that mimics expensive simulations of the 21cm signal across a wide parameter space to high precision. We embed our emulator within a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo framework, enabling it to explore the posterior distribution over a large number of model parameters, including those that govern the Epoch of Reionization, the Epoch of X-ray Heating, and cosmology. As a worked example, we use our emulator to present an updated parameter constraint forecast for the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array experiment, showing that its characterization of a fiducial 21cm power spectrum will considerably narrow the allowed parameter space of reionization and heating parameters, and could help strengthen Planck's constraints on $\sigma_8$. We provide both our generalized emulator code and its implementation specifically for 21cm parameter constraints as publicly available software.
  • The experimental efforts to detect the redshifted 21 cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are limited predominantly by the chromatic instrumental systematic effect. The delay spectrum methodology for 21 cm power spectrum measurements brought new attention to the critical impact of an antenna's chromaticity on the viability of making this measurement. This methodology established a straightforward relationship between time-domain response of an instrument and the power spectrum modes accessible to a 21 cm EoR experiment. We examine the performance of a prototype of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) array element that is currently observing in Karoo desert, South Africa. We present a mathematical framework to derive the beam integrated frequency response of a HERA prototype element in reception from the return loss measurements between 100-200 MHz and determined the extent of additional foreground contamination in the delay space. The measurement reveals excess spectral structures in comparison to the simulation studies of the HERA element. Combined with the HERA data analysis pipeline that incorporates inverse covariance weighting in optimal quadratic estimation of power spectrum, we find that in spite of its departure from the simulated response, HERA prototype element satisfies the necessary criteria posed by the foreground attenuation limits and potentially can measure the power spectrum at spatial modes as low as $k_{\parallel} > 0.1h$~Mpc$^{-1}$. The work highlights a straightforward method for directly measuring an instrument response and assessing its impact on 21 cm EoR power spectrum measurements for future experiments that will use reflector-type antenna.
  • The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a radio interferometer aiming to detect the power spectrum of 21 cm fluctuations from neutral hydrogen from the Epoch of Reionization (EOR). Drawing on lessons from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), HERA is a hexagonal array of large (14 m diameter) dishes with suspended dipole feeds. Not only does the dish determine overall sensitivity, it affects the observed frequency structure of foregrounds in the interferometer. This is the first of a series of four papers characterizing the frequency and angular response of the dish with simulations and measurements. We focus in this paper on the angular response (i.e., power pattern), which sets the relative weighting between sky regions of high and low delay, and thus, apparent source frequency structure. We measure the angular response at 137 MHz using the ORBCOMM beam mapping system of Neben et al. We measure a collecting area of 93 m^2 in the optimal dish/feed configuration, implying HERA-320 should detect the EOR power spectrum at z~9 with a signal-to-noise ratio of 12.7 using a foreground avoidance approach with a single season of observations, and 74.3 using a foreground subtraction approach. Lastly we study the impact of these beam measurements on the distribution of foregrounds in Fourier space.
  • Intensity mapping is a promising technique for surveying the large scale structure of our Universe from $z=0$ to $z \sim 150$, using the brightness temperature field of spectral lines to directly observe previously unexplored portions of out cosmic timeline. Examples of targeted lines include the $21\,\textrm{cm}$ hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen, rotational lines of carbon monoxide, and fine structure lines of singly ionized carbon. Recent efforts have focused on detections of the power spectrum of spatial fluctuations, but have been hindered by systematics such as foreground contamination. This has motivated the decomposition of data into Fourier modes perpendicular and parallel to the line-of-sight, which has been shown to be a particularly powerful way to diagnose systematics. However, such a method is well-defined only in the limit of a narrow-field, flat-sky approximation. This limits the sensitivity of intensity mapping experiments, as it means that wide surveys must be separately analyzed as a patchwork of smaller fields. In this paper, we develop a framework for analyzing intensity mapping data in a spherical Fourier-Bessel basis, which incorporates curved sky effects without difficulty. We use our framework to generalize a number of techniques in intensity mapping data analysis from the flat sky to the curved sky. These include visibility-based estimators for the power spectrum, treatments of interloper lines, and the "foreground wedge" signature of spectrally smooth foregrounds.
  • The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a staged experiment to measure 21 cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) throughout cosmic reionization ($z=6-12$), and to explore earlier epochs of our Cosmic Dawn ($z\sim30$). During these epochs, early stars and black holes heated and ionized the IGM, introducing fluctuations in 21 cm emission. HERA is designed to characterize the evolution of the 21 cm power spectrum to constrain the timing and morphology of reionization, the properties of the first galaxies, the evolution of large-scale structure, and the early sources of heating. The full HERA instrument will be a 350-element interferometer in South Africa consisting of 14-m parabolic dishes observing from 50 to 250 MHz. Currently, 19 dishes have been deployed on site and the next 18 are under construction. HERA has been designated as an SKA Precursor instrument. In this paper, we summarize HERA's scientific context and provide forecasts for its key science results. After reviewing the current state of the art in foreground mitigation, we use the delay-spectrum technique to motivate high-level performance requirements for the HERA instrument. Next, we present the HERA instrument design, along with the subsystem specifications that ensure that HERA meets its performance requirements. Finally, we summarize the schedule and status of the project. We conclude by suggesting that, given the realities of foreground contamination, current-generation 21 cm instruments are approaching their sensitivity limits. HERA is designed to bring both the sensitivity and the precision to deliver its primary science on the basis of proven foreground filtering techniques, while developing new subtraction techniques to unlock new capabilities. The result will be a major step toward realizing the widely recognized scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology.
  • Realizing the potential of 21 cm tomography to statistically probe the intergalactic medium before and during the Epoch of Reionization requires large telescopes and precise control of systematics. Next-generation telescopes are now being designed and built to meet these challenges, drawing lessons from first-generation experiments that showed the benefits of densely packed, highly redundant arrays--in which the same mode on the sky is sampled by many antenna pairs--for achieving high sensitivity, precise calibration, and robust foreground mitigation. In this work, we focus on the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an interferometer with a dense, redundant core designed following these lessons to be optimized for 21 cm cosmology. We show how modestly supplementing or modifying a compact design like HERA's can still deliver high sensitivity while enhancing strategies for calibration and foreground mitigation. In particular, we compare the imaging capability of several array configurations, both instantaneously (to address instrumental and ionospheric effects) and with rotation synthesis (for foreground removal). We also examine the effects that configuration has on calibratability using instantaneous redundancy. We find that improved imaging with sub-aperture sampling via "off-grid" antennas and increased angular resolution via far-flung "outrigger" antennas is possible with a redundantly calibratable array configuration.
  • When planet-hosting stars evolve off the main sequence and go through the red-giant branch, the stars become orders of magnitudes more luminous and, at the same time, lose mass at much higher rates than their main-sequence counterparts. Accordingly, if planetary companions exist around these stars at orbital distances of a few AU, they will be heated up to the level of canonical hot Jupiters and also be subjected to a dense stellar wind. Given that magnetized planets interacting with stellar winds emit radio waves, such "Red-Giant Hot Jupiters" (RGHJs) may also be candidate radio emitters. We estimate the spectral auroral radio intensity of RGHJs based on the empirical relation with the stellar wind as well as a proposed scaling for planetary magnetic fields. RGHJs might be intrinsically as bright as or brighter than canonical hot Jupiters and about 100 times brighter than equivalent objects around main-sequence stars. We examine the capabilities of low-frequency radio observatories to detect this emission and find that the signal from an RGHJ may be detectable at distances up to a few hundred parsecs with the Square Kilometer Array.
  • We generalize the technique of fringe-rate filtering, whereby visibilities measured by a radio interferometer are re-weighted according to their temporal variation. As the Earth rotates, radio sources traverse through an interferometer's fringe pattern at rates that depend on their position on the sky. Capitalizing on this geometric interpretation of fringe rates, we employ time-domain convolution kernels to enact fringe-rate filters that sculpt the effective primary beam of antennas in an interferometer. As we show, beam sculpting through fringe-rate filtering can be used to optimize measurements for a variety of applications, including mapmaking, minimizing polarization leakage, suppressing instrumental systematics, and enhancing the sensitivity of power-spectrum measurements. We show that fringe-rate filtering arises naturally in minimum variance treatments of many of these problems, enabling optimal visibility-based approaches to analyses of interferometric data that avoid systematics potentially introduced by traditional approaches such as imaging. Our techniques have recently been demonstrated in Ali et al. (2015), where new upper limits were placed on the 21 cm power spectrum from reionization, showcasing the ability of fringe-rate filtering to successfully boost sensitivity and reduce the impact of systematics in deep observations.
  • Amongst standard model parameters that are constrained by cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations, the optical depth $\tau$ stands out as a nuisance parameter. While $\tau$ provides some crude limits on reionization, it also degrades constraints on other cosmological parameters. Here we explore how 21 cm cosmology---as a direct probe of reionization---can be used to independently predict $\tau$ in an effort to improve CMB parameter constraints. We develop two complementary schemes for doing so. The first uses 21 cm power spectrum observations in conjunction with semi-analytic simulations to predict $\tau$. The other uses global 21 cm measurements to directly constrain low redshift (post-reheating) contributions to $\tau$ in a relatively model-independent way. Forecasting the performance of the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, we find that significant reductions in the errors on $\tau$ can be achieved. These results are particularly effective at breaking the CMB degeneracy between $\tau$ and the amplitude of the primordial fluctuation spectrum $A_s$, with errors on $\ln (10^{10} A_s)$ reduced by up to a factor of four. Stage 4 CMB constraints on the neutrino mass sum are also improved, with errors potentially reduced to $12\,\textrm{meV}$ regardless of whether CMB experiments can precisely measure the reionization bump in polarization power spectra. Observations of the 21 cm line are therefore capable of improving not only our understanding of reionization astrophysics, but also of cosmology in general.
  • Improvements in current instruments and the advent of next-generation instruments will soon push observational 21 cm cosmology into a new era, with high significance measurements of both the power spectrum and the mean ("global") signal of the 21 cm brightness temperature. In this paper we use the recently commenced Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array as a worked example to provide forecasts on astrophysical and cosmological parameter constraints. In doing so we improve upon previous forecasts in a number of ways. First, we provide updated forecasts using the latest best-fit cosmological parameters from the Planck satellite, exploring the impact of different Planck datasets on 21 cm experiments. We also show that despite the exquisite constraints that other probes have placed on cosmological parameters, the remaining uncertainties are still large enough to have a non-negligible impact on upcoming 21 cm data analyses. While this complicates high-precision constraints on reionization models, it provides an avenue for 21 cm reionization measurements to constrain cosmology. We additionally forecast HERA's ability to measure the ionization history using a combination of power spectrum measurements and semi-analytic simulations. Finally, we consider ways in which 21 cm global signal and power spectrum measurements can be combined, and propose a method by which power spectrum results can be used to train a compact parameterization of the global signal. This parameterization reduces the number of parameters needed to describe the global signal, increasing the likelihood of a high significance measurement.
  • We present constraints on both the kinetic temperature of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z=8.4, and on models for heating the IGM at high-redshift with X-ray emission from the first collapsed objects. These constraints are derived using a semi-analytic method to explore the new measurements of the 21 cm power spectrum from the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), which were presented in a companion paper, Ali et al. (2015). Twenty-one cm power spectra with amplitudes of hundreds of mK^2 can be generically produced if the kinetic temperature of the IGM is significantly below the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB); as such, the new results from PAPER place lower limits on the IGM temperature at z=8.4. Allowing for the unknown ionization state of the IGM, our measurements find the IGM temperature to be above ~5 K for neutral fractions between 10% and 85%, above ~7 K for neutral fractions between 15% and 80%, or above ~10 K for neutral fractions between 30% and 70%. We also calculate the heating of the IGM that would be provided by the observed high redshift galaxy population, and find that for most models, these galaxies are sufficient to bring the IGM temperature above our lower limits. However, there are significant ranges of parameter space that could produce a signal ruled out by the PAPER measurements; models with a steep drop-off in the star formation rate density at high redshifts or with relatively low values for the X-ray to star formation rate efficiency of high redshift galaxies are generally disfavored. The PAPER measurements are consistent with (but do not constrain) a hydrogen spin temperature above the CMB temperature, a situation which we find to be generally predicted if galaxies fainter than the current detection limits of optical/NIR surveys are included in calculations of X-ray heating.
  • In order to study the "Cosmic Dawn" and the Epoch of Reionization with 21 cm tomography, we need to statistically separate the cosmological signal from foregrounds known to be orders of magnitude brighter. Over the last few years, we have learned much about the role our telescopes play in creating a putatively foreground-free region called the "EoR window." In this work, we examine how an interferometer's effects can be taken into account in a way that allows for the rigorous estimation of 21 cm power spectra from interferometric maps while mitigating foreground contamination and thus increasing sensitivity. This requires a precise understanding of the statistical relationship between the maps we make and the underlying true sky. While some of these calculations would be computationally infeasible if performed exactly, we explore several well-controlled approximations that make mapmaking and the calculation of map statistics much faster, especially for compact and highly redundant interferometers designed specifically for 21 cm cosmology. We demonstrate the utility of these methods and the parametrized trade-offs between accuracy and speed using one such telescope, the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, as a case study.
  • A number of experiments are currently working towards a measurement of the 21 cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization. Whether or not these experiments deliver a detection of cosmological emission, their limited sensitivity will prevent them from providing detailed information about the astrophysics of reionization. In this work, we consider what types of measurements will be enabled by a next-generation of larger 21 cm EoR telescopes. To calculate the type of constraints that will be possible with such arrays, we use simple models for the instrument, foreground emission, and the reionization history. We focus primarily on an instrument modeled after the $\sim 0.1~\rm{km}^2$ collecting area Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) concept design, and parameterize the uncertainties with regard to foreground emission by considering different limits to the recently described "wedge" footprint in k-space. Uncertainties in the reionization history are accounted for using a series of simulations which vary the ionizing efficiency and minimum virial temperature of the galaxies responsible for reionization, as well as the mean free path of ionizing photons through the IGM. Given various combinations of models, we consider the significance of the possible power spectrum detections, the ability to trace the power spectrum evolution versus redshift, the detectability of salient power spectrum features, and the achievable level of quantitative constraints on astrophysical parameters. Ultimately, we find that $0.1~\rm{km}^2$ of collecting area is enough to ensure a very high significance ($\gtrsim30\sigma$) detection of the reionization power spectrum in even the most pessimistic scenarios. This sensitivity should allow for meaningful constraints on the reionization history and astrophysical parameters, especially if foreground subtraction techniques can be improved and successfully implemented.
  • The epoch of reionization power spectrum is expected to evolve strongly with redshift, and it is this variation with cosmic history that will allow us to begin to place constraints on the physics of reionization. The primary obstacle to the measurement of the EoR power spectrum is bright foreground emission. We present an analysis of observations from the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) telescope which place new limits on the HI power spectrum over the redshift range of $7.5<z<10.5$, extending previously published single redshift results to cover the full range accessible to the instrument. To suppress foregrounds, we use filtering techniques that take advantage of the large instrumental bandwidth to isolate and suppress foreground leakage into the interesting regions of $k$-space. Our 500 hour integration is the longest such yet recorded and demonstrates this method to a dynamic range of $10^4$. Power spectra at different points across the redshift range reveal the variable efficacy of the foreground isolation. Noise limited measurements of $\Delta^2$ at $k=$0.2hMpc$^{-1}$ and z$=7.55$ reach as low as (48mK)$^2$ ($1\sigma$). We demonstrate that the size of the error bars in our power spectrum measurement as generated by a bootstrap method is consistent with the fluctuations due to thermal noise. Relative to this thermal noise, most spectra exhibit an excess of power at a few sigma. The likely sources of this excess include residual foreground leakage, particularly at the highest redshift, and unflagged RFI. We conclude by discussing data reduction improvements that promise to remove much of this excess.
  • For there to be a successful measurement of the 21 cm Epoch of Reionization (EoR) power spectrum, it is crucial that strong foreground contaminants be robustly suppressed. These foregrounds come from a variety of sources (such as Galactic synchrotron emission and extragalactic point sources), but almost all share the property of being spectrally smooth, and when viewed through the chromatic response of an interferometer, occupy a signature "wedge" region in cylindrical $k_\perp k_\parallel$ Fourier space. The complement of the foreground wedge is termed the "EoR window", and is expected to be mostly foreground-free, allowing clean measurements of the power spectrum. This paper is a sequel to a previous paper that established a rigorous mathematical framework for describing the foreground wedge and the EoR window. Here, we use our framework to explore statistical methods by which the EoR window can be enlarged, thereby increasing the sensitivity of a power spectrum measurement. We adapt the FKP approximation (commonly used in galaxy surveys) for 21 cm cosmology, and also compare the optimal quadratic estimator to simpler estimators that ignore covariances between different Fourier modes. The optimal quadratic estimator is found to suppress foregrounds by an extra factor of $\sim 10^5$ in power at the peripheries of the EoR window, boosting the detection of the cosmological signal from $12\sigma$ to $50\sigma$ at the midpoint of reionization in our fiducial models. If numerical issues can be finessed, decorrelation techniques allow the EoR window to be further enlarged, enabling measurements to be made deep within the foreground wedge. These techniques do not assume that foreground are Gaussian-distributed, and we additionally prove that a final round of foreground subtraction can be performed after decorrelation in a way that is guaranteed to have no cosmological signal loss.
  • The 21 cm line provides a powerful probe of astrophysics and cosmology at high redshifts, but unlocking the potential of this probe requires the robust mitigation of foreground contaminants that are typically several orders of magnitude brighter than the cosmological signal. Recent simulations and observations have shown that the smooth spectral structure of foregrounds combines with instrument chromaticity to contaminate a "wedge"-shaped region in cylindrical Fourier space. While previous efforts have explored the suppression of foregrounds within this wedge, as well as the avoidance of this highly contaminated region, all such efforts have neglected a rigorous examination of the error statistics associated with the wedge. Using a quadratic estimator formalism applied to the interferometric measurement equation, we provide a framework for such a rigorous analysis (incorporating a fully covariant treatment of errors). Additionally, we find that there are strong error correlations at high spatial wavenumbers that have so far been neglected in sensitivity derivations. These error correlations substantially degrade the sensitivity of arrays relying on contributions from long baselines, compared to what one would estimate assuming uncorrelated errors.
  • We present new constraints on the 21cm Epoch of Reionization (EoR) power spectrum derived from 3 months of observing with a 32-antenna, dual-polarization deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. In this paper, we demonstrate the efficacy of the delay-spectrum approach to avoiding foregrounds, achieving over 8 orders of magnitude of foreground suppression (in $\textrm{mK}^2$). Combining this approach with a procedure for removing off-diagonal covariances arising from instrumental systematics, we achieve a best 2-sigma upper limit of $(41\,\textrm{mK})^2$ for $k=0.27 h\textrm{Mpc}^{-1}$ at $z=7.7$. This limit falls within an order of magnitude of the brighter predictions of the expected 21cm EoR signal level. Using the upper limits set by these measurements, we generate new constraints on the brightness temperature of 21cm emission in neutral regions for various reionization models. We show that for several ionization scenarios, our measurements are inconsistent with cold reionization. That is, heating of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) is necessary to remain consistent with the constraints we report. Hence, we have suggestive evidence that by $z=7.7$, the HI has been warmed from its cold primordial state, probably by X-rays from high-mass X-ray binaries or mini-quasars. The strength of this evidence depends on the ionization state of the IGM, which we are not yet able to constrain. This result is consistent with standard predictions for how reionization might have proceeded.
  • We present a catalog of spectral measurements covering a 100-200 MHz band for 32 sources, derived from observations with a 64-antenna deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. For transit telescopes such as PAPER, calibration of the primary beam is a difficult endeavor, and errors in this calibration are a major source of error in the determination of source spectra. In order to decrease reliance on accurate beam calibration, we focus on calibrating sources in a narrow declination range from -46d to -40d. Since sources at similar declinations follow nearly identical paths through the primary beam, this restriction greatly reduces errors associated with beam calibration, yielding a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of derived source spectra. Extrapolating from higher frequency catalogs, we derive the flux scale using a Monte-Carlo fit across multiple sources that includes uncertainty from both catalog and measurement errors. Fitting spectral models to catalog data and these new PAPER measurements, we derive new flux models for Pictor A and 31 other sources at nearby declinations. 90% of these confirm and refine a power-law model for flux density. Of note is the new Pictor A flux model, which is accurate to 1.4% and shows, in contrast to previous models, that between 100 MHz and 2 GHz, the spectrum of Pictor A is consistent with a single power law given by a flux at 150 MHz of 382+/-5.4 Jy, and a spectral index of -0.76+/-0.01. This accuracy represents an order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements in this band, and is limited by the uncertainty in the catalog measurements used to estimate the absolute flux scale. The simplicity and improved accuracy of Pictor A's spectrum make it an excellent calibrator for experiments seeking to measure 21cm emission from the Epoch of Reionization.
  • Experiments aimed at detecting highly-redshifted 21 centimeter emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are plagued by the contamination of foreground emission. A potentially important source of contaminating foregrounds may be Faraday-rotated, polarized emission, which leaks into the estimate of the intrinsically unpolarized EoR signal. While these foregrounds' intrinsic polarization may not be problematic, the spectral structure introduced by the Faraday rotation could be. To better understand and characterize these effects, we present a simulation of the polarized sky between 120 and 180 MHz. We compute a single visibility, and estimate the three-dimensional power spectrum from that visibility using the delay spectrum approach presented in Parsons et al. (2012b) . Using the Donald C. Backer Precision Array to Probe the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) as an example instrument, we show the expected leakage into the unpolarized power spectrum to be several orders of magnitude above the expected 21cm EoR signal.
  • We present new observations with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) with the aim of measuring the properties of foreground emission for 21cm Epoch of Reionization experiments at 150 MHz. We focus on the footprint of the foregrounds in cosmological Fourier space to understand which modes of the 21cm power spectrum will most likely be compromised by foreground emission. These observations confirm predictions that foregrounds can be isolated to a "wedge"-like region of 2D (k-perpendicular, k-parallel)-space, creating a window for cosmological studies at higher k-parallel values. We also find that the emission extends past the nominal edge of this wedge due to spectral structure in the foregrounds, with this feature most prominent on the shortest baselines. Finally, we filter the data to retain only this "unsmooth" emission and image specific k-parallel modes of it. The resultant images show an excess of power at the lowest modes, but no emission can be clearly localized to any one region of the sky. This image is highly suggestive that the most problematic foregrounds for 21cm EoR studies will not be easily identifiable bright sources, but rather an aggregate of fainter emission.
  • We present observations taken with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) of the Centaurus A field in the frequency range 114 to 188 MHz. The resulting image has a 25' resolution, a dynamic range of 3500 and an r.m.s. of 0.5 Jy\beam (for a beam size of 25' x 23'). A spectral index map of Cen A is produced across the full band. The spectral index distribution is qualitatively consistent with electron reacceleration in regions of excess turbulence in the radio lobes, as previously identified morphologically. Hence, there appears to be an association of 'severe weather' in radio lobes with energy input into the relativistic electron population. We compare the PAPER large scale radio image with the X-ray image from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. There is a tentative correlation between radio and X-ray features at the end of the southern lobe, some 200 kpc from the nucleus, as might be expected from inverse Compton scattering of the CMB by the relativistic electrons also responsible for the radio synchrotron emission. The magnetic fields derived from the (possible) IC and radio emission are of similar magnitude to fields derived under the minimum pressure assumptions, ~ 1 {\mu}G. However, the X-ray field is complex, with large scale gradients and features possibly unrelated to Cen A. If these X-ray features are unrelated to Cen A, then these fields are lower limits.