• ROXs 12 (2MASS J16262803-2526477) is a young star hosting a directly imaged companion near the deuterium-burning limit. We present a suite of spectroscopic, imaging, and time-series observations to characterize the physical and environmental properties of this system. Moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of ROXs 12 B from Gemini-North/NIFS and Keck/OSIRIS reveals signatures of low surface gravity including weak alkali absorption lines and a triangular $H$-band pseudo-continuum shape. No signs of Pa$\beta$ emission are evident. As a population, however, we find that about half (46 $\pm$ 14\%) of young ($\lesssim$15 Myr) companions with masses $\lesssim$20 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ possess actively accreting subdisks detected via Pa$\beta$ line emission, which represents a lower limit on the prevalence of circumplanetary disks in general as some are expected to be in a quiescent phase of accretion. The bolometric luminosity of the companion and age of the host star (6$^{+4}_{-2}$ Myr) imply a mass of 17.5 $\pm$ 1.5 $M_\mathrm{Jup}$ for ROXs 12 B based on hot-start evolutionary models. We identify a wide (5100 AU) tertiary companion to this system, 2MASS J16262774-2527247, which is heavily accreting and exhibits stochastic variability in its $K2$ light curve. By combining $v$sin$i_*$ measurements with rotation periods from $K2$, we constrain the line-of-sight inclinations of ROXs 12 A and 2MASS J16262774-2527247 and find that they are misaligned by 60$^{+7}_{-11}$$^{\circ}$. In addition, the orbital axis of ROXs 12 B is likely misaligned from the spin axis of its host star ROXs 12 A, suggesting that ROXs 12 B formed akin to fragmenting binary stars or in an equatorial disk that was torqued by the wide stellar tertiary.
  • We present the first scattered light image of the debris disk around HD 129590, a ~1.3 M$_\odot$ G1V member of the Scorpius Centaurus association with age ~10-16 Myr. The debris disk is imaged with the high contrast imaging instrument SPHERE at the Very Large Telescope, and is revealed by both the IRDIS and IFS subsytems, operating in the H and YJ bands respectively. The disk has a high infrared luminosity of $L_{\textrm{IR}}/L_{\textrm{star}}$~5$\times$10$^{-3}$, and has been resolved in other studies using ALMA. We detect a nearly edge on ring, with evidence of an inner clearing. We fit the debris disk using a model characterized by a single bright ring, with radius ~60-70 AU, in broad agreement with previous analysis of the target SED. The disk is vertically thin, and has an inclination angle of ~75$^\circ$. Along with other previously imaged edge-on disks in the Sco-Cen association such as HD 110058, HD 115600, and HD 111520, this disk image will allow of the structure and morphology of very young debris disks, shortly after the epoch of planet formation has ceased.
  • Past estimates for the age of the Upper Sco Association are typically 11-13 Myr for intermediate-mass stars and 4-5 Myr for low-mass stars. In this study, we simulate populations of young stars to investigate whether this apparent dependence of estimated age on spectral type may be explained by the star formation history of the association. Solar and intermediate mass stars begin their pre-main sequence evolution on the Hayashi track, with fully convective interiors and cool photospheres. Intermediate mass stars quickly heat up and transition onto the radiative Henyey track. As a consequence, for clusters in which star formation occurs on a similar timescale as the transition from a convective to a radiative interior, discrepancies in ages will arise when ages are calculated as a function of temperature instead of mass. Simple simulations of a cluster with constant star formation over several Myr may explain about half of the difference in inferred ages versus photospheric temperature; speculative constructions that consist of a constant star formation followed by a large supernova-driven burst could fully explain the differences, including those between F and G stars where evolutionary tracks may be more accurate. The age spreads of low-mass stars predicted from these prescriptions for star formation are consistent with the observed luminosity spread of Upper Sco. The conclusion that a lengthy star formation history will yield a temperature dependence in ages is expected from the basic physics of pre-main sequence evolution and is qualitatively robust to the large uncertainties in pre-main sequence evolutionary models.
  • While the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a uniquely powerful telescope, its impact in certain fields of astrophysics has been limited by observatory policies rather than the telescope's innate technical capabilities. In particular, several observatory policies present challenges for observations of variable, mobile, and/or transient sources --- collectively referred to here as "time-domain" observations. In this whitepaper we identify some of these policies, describe the scientific applications they impair, and suggest changes that would increase ALMA's science impact in Cycle 6 and beyond. Parties interested in time-domain science with ALMA are encouraged to join the ALMA Time-domain Special Interest Group (ATSIG) by signing up for the ATSIG mailing list at https://groups.google.com/group/alma-td-sig .
  • We revisit the nature of large dips in flux from extinction by dusty circumstellar material that is observed by Kepler for many young stars in the Upper Sco and $\rho$ Oph star formation regions. These young, low-mass "dipper" stars are known to have low accretion rates and primarily host moderately evolved dusty circumstellar disks. Young low mass stars often exhibit rotating star spots that cause quasi-periodic photometric variations. We found no evidence for periods associated with the dips that are different from the star spot rotation period in spectrograms constructed from the light curves. The material causing the dips in most of these light curves must be approximately corotating with the star. We find that disk temperatures computed at the disk corotation radius are cool enough that dust should not sublime. Crude estimates for stellar magnetic field strengths and accretion rates are consistent with magnetospheric truncation near the corotation radius. Magnetospheric truncation models can explain why the dips are associated with material near corotation and how dusty material is lifted out of the midplane to obscure the star which would account for the large fraction of young low mass stars that are dippers. We propose that variations in disk orientation angle, stellar magnetic field dipole tilt axis, and disk accretion rate are underlying parameters accounting for differences in the dipper light curves.
  • TYC 8241 2652 1 is a young star that showed a strong mid-infrared (mid-IR, 8-25 mu) excess in all observations before 2008 consistent with a dusty disk. Between 2008 and 2010 the mid-IR luminosity of this system dropped dramatically by at least a factor of 30 suggesting a loss of dust mass of an order of magnitude or more. We aim to constrain possible models including removal of disk material by stellar activity processes, the presence of a binary companion, or other explanations suggested in the literature. We present new X-ray observations, optical spectroscopy, near-IR interferometry, and mid-IR photometry of this system to constrain its parameters and further explore the cause of the dust mass loss. In X-rays TYC 8241 2652 1 has all properties expected from a young star: Its luminosity is in the saturation regime and the abundance pattern shows enhancement of O/Fe. The photospheric Ha line is filled with a weak emission feature, indicating chromospheric activity consistent with the observed level of coronal emission. Interferometry does not detect a companion and sets upper limits on the companion mass of 0.2, 0.35, 0.1 and 0.05 M_sun at projected physical separations of 0.1-4 AU,4-5 AU, 5-10 AU, and 10-30 AU, respectively (assuming a distance of 120.9 pc). Our mid-IR measurements, the first of the system since 2012, are consistent with the depleted dust level seen after 2009. The new data confirms that stellar activity is unlikely to destroy the dust in the disk and shows that scenarios where either TYC 8241 2652 1 heats the disk of a binary companion or a potential companion heats the disk of TYC 8241 2652 1 are unlikely.
  • We present multi-epoch astrometric radio observations with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) of the young ultracool-dwarf binary LSPM J1314+1320AB . The radio emission comes from the secondary star. Combining the VLBA data with Keck near-infrared adaptive-optics observations of both components, a full astrometric fit of parallax ($\pi_{\rm abs}=57.975\pm0.045$ mas, corresponding to a distance of $d=17.249\pm0.013$ pc), proper motion ($\mu_{\rm \alpha cos \delta}=-247.99\pm0.10$ mas yr$^{-1}$, $\mu_{\delta}=-183.58\pm0.22$ mas yr$^{-1}$), and orbital motion is obtained. Despite the fact that the two components have nearly identical masses to within $\pm2$%, the secondary's radio emission exceeds that of the primary by a factor of $\gtrsim$30, suggesting a difference in stellar rotation history, which could result in different magnetic field configurations. Alternatively, the emission could be anisotropic and beamed toward us for the secondary but not for the primary. Using only reflex motion, we exclude planets of mass 0.7 to 10 $M_{\rm jup}$ with orbital periods of 600 to 10 days, respectively. Additionally, we use the full orbital solution of the binary to derive an upper limit for the semi-major axis of 0.23 AU for stable planetary orbits within this system. These limits cover a parameter space that is inaccessible with, and complementary to, near-infrared radial velocity surveys of ultracool dwarfs. Our absolute astrometry will constitute an important test for the astrometric calibration of Gaia.
  • We present novel tests of pre$-$main-sequence models based on individual dynamical masses for the M7 binary LSPM J1314+1320AB. Joint analysis of our Keck adaptive optics astrometric monitoring along with Very Long Baseline Array radio data from a companion paper yield component masses of $0.0885\pm0.0006$ $M_{\odot}$ and $0.0875\pm0.0010$ $M_{\odot}$ and a parallactic distance of $17.249\pm0.013$ pc. We also derive component luminosities that are consistent with the system being coeval at an age of $80.8\pm2.5$ Myr, according to BHAC15 evolutionary models. The presence of lithium is consistent with model predictions, marking the first time the theoretical lithium depletion boundary has been tested with ultracool dwarfs of known mass. However, we find that the average evolutionary model-derived effective temperature ($2950\pm5$ K) is 180 K hotter than we derive from a spectral type$-$$T_{\rm eff}$ relation based on BT-Settl models ($2770\pm100$ K). We suggest that the dominant source of this discrepancy is model radii being too small by $\approx$13%. In a test that mimics the typical application of evolutionary models by observers, we derive masses on the H-R diagram using the luminosity and BT-Settl temperature. The estimated masses are $46^{+16}_{-19}$% (2.0$\sigma$) lower than we measure dynamically and would imply that this is a system of $\approx$50 $M_{\rm Jup}$ brown dwarfs, highlighting the large systematic errors possible when inferring masses from the H-R diagram. This is first time masses have been measured for ultracool ($\geq$M6) dwarfs displaying spectral signatures of low gravity. Based on features in the infrared, LSPM J1314+1320AB appears higher gravity than typical Pleiades and AB Dor members, opposite the expectation given its younger age. The components of LSPM J1314+1320AB are now the nearest, lowest mass pre$-$main-sequence stars with direct mass measurements.