• This article proposes a Bayesian approach to regression with a continuous scalar response and an undirected network predictor. Undirected network predictors are often expressed in terms of symmetric adjacency matrices, with rows and columns of the matrix representing the nodes, and zero entries signifying no association between two corresponding nodes. Network predictor matrices are typically vectorized prior to any analysis, thus failing to account for the important structural information in the network. This results in poor inferential and predictive performance in presence of small sample sizes. We propose a novel class of network shrinkage priors for the coefficient corresponding to the undirected network predictor. The proposed framework is devised to detect both nodes and edges in the network predictive of the response. Our framework is implemented using an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Empirical results in simulation studies illustrate strikingly superior inferential and predictive gains of the proposed framework in comparison with the ordinary high dimensional Bayesian shrinkage priors and penalized optimization schemes. We apply our method to a brain connectome dataset that contains information on brain networks along with a measure of creativity for multiple individuals. Here, interest lies in building a regression model of the creativity measure on the network predictor to identify important regions and connections in the brain strongly associated with creativity. To the best of our knowledge, our approach is the first principled Bayesian method that is able to detect scientifically interpretable regions and connections in the brain actively impacting the continuous response (creativity) in the presence of a small sample size.
  • Discrete random structures are important tools in Bayesian nonparametrics and the resulting models have proven effective in density estimation, clustering, topic modeling and prediction, among others. In this paper, we consider nested processes and study the dependence structures they induce. Dependence ranges between homogeneity, corresponding to full exchangeability, and maximum heterogeneity, corresponding to (unconditional) independence across samples. The popular nested Dirichlet process is shown to degenerate to the fully exchangeable case when there are ties across samples at the observed or latent level. To overcome this drawback, inherent to nesting general discrete random measures, we introduce a novel class of latent nested processes. These are obtained by adding common and group-specific completely random measures and, then, normalising to yield dependent random probability measures. We provide results on the partition distributions induced by latent nested processes, and develop an Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler for Bayesian inferences. A test for distributional homogeneity across groups is obtained as a by product. The results and their inferential implications are showcased on synthetic and real data.
  • We propose a multinomial logistic regression model for link prediction in a time series of directed binary networks. To account for the dynamic nature of the data we employ a dynamic model for the model parameters that is strongly connected with the fused lasso penalty. In addition to promoting sparseness, this prior allows us to explore the presence of change points in the structure of the network. We introduce fast computational algorithms for estimation and prediction using both optimization and Bayesian approaches. The performance of the model is illustrated using simulated data and data from a financial trading network in the NYMEX natural gas futures market. Supplementary material containing the trading network data set and code to implement the algorithms is available online.
  • We develop a sparse autologistic model for investigating the impact of diversification and disintermediation strategies in the evolution of financial trading networks. In order to induce sparsity in the model estimates and address substantive questions about the underlying processes the model includes an $L^1$ regularization penalty. This makes implementation feasible for complex dynamic networks in which the number of parameters is considerably greater than the number of observations over time. We use the model to characterize trader behavior in the NYMEX natural gas futures market, where we find that disintermediation and not diversification or momentum tend to drive market microstructure.
  • Over the last few years there has been a growing interest in using financial trading networks to understand the microstructure of financial markets. Most of the methodologies developed so far for this purpose have been based on the study of descriptive summaries of the networks such as the average node degree and the clustering coefficient. In contrast, this paper develops novel statistical methods for modeling sequences of financial trading networks. Our approach uses a stochastic blockmodel to describe the structure of the network during each period, and then links multiple time periods using a hidden Markov model. This structure allows us to identify events that affect the structure of the market and make accurate short-term prediction of future transactions. The methodology is illustrated using data from the NYMEX natural gas futures market from January 2005 to December 2008.
  • We construct a novel class of stochastic blockmodels using Bayesian nonparametric mixtures. These model allows us to jointly estimate the structure of multiple networks and explicitly compare the community structures underlying them, while allowing us to capture realistic properties of the underlying networks. Inference is carried out using MCMC algorithms that incorporates sequentially allocated split-merge steps to improve mixing. The models are illustrated using a simulation study and a variety of real-life examples.
  • We formulate a discrete-time Bayesian stochastic volatility model for high-frequency stock-market data that directly accounts for microstructure noise, and outline a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for parameter estimation. The methods described in this paper are designed to be coherent across all sampling timescales, with the goal of estimating the latent log-volatility signal from data collected at arbitrarily short sampling periods. In keeping with this goal, we carefully develop a method for eliciting priors. The empirical results derived from both simulated and real data show that directly accounting for microstructure in a state-space formulation allows for well-calibrated estimates of the log-volatility process driving prices.
  • Roll call data are widely used to assess legislators' preferences and ideology, as well as test theories of legislative behavior. In particular, roll call data is often used to determine whether the revealed preferences of legislators are affected by outside forces such as party pressure, minority status or procedural rules. This paper describes a Bayesian hierarchical model that extends existing spatial voting models to test sharp hypotheses about differences in preferences the using posterior probabilities associated with such hypotheses. We use our model to investigate the effect of the change of party majority status during the 107th U.S. Senate on the revealed preferences of senators. This analysis provides evidence that change in party affiliation might affect the revealed preferences of legislators, but provides no evidence about the effect of majority status on the revealed preferences of legislators.
  • The analysis of the three-dimensional structure of proteins is an important topic in molecular biochemistry. Structure plays a critical role in defining the function of proteins and is more strongly conserved than amino acid sequence over evolutionary timescales. A key challenge is the identification and evaluation of structural similarity between proteins; such analysis can aid in understanding the role of newly discovered proteins and help elucidate evolutionary relationships between organisms. Computational biologists have developed many clever algorithmic techniques for comparing protein structures, however, all are based on heuristic optimization criteria, making statistical interpretation somewhat difficult. Here we present a fully probabilistic framework for pairwise structural alignment of proteins. Our approach has several advantages, including the ability to capture alignment uncertainty and to estimate key "gap" parameters which critically affect the quality of the alignment. We show that several existing alignment methods arise as maximum a posteriori estimates under specific choices of prior distributions and error models. Our probabilistic framework is also easily extended to incorporate additional information, which we demonstrate by including primary sequence information to generate simultaneous sequence-structure alignments that can resolve ambiguities obtained using structure alone. This combined model also provides a natural approach for the difficult task of estimating evolutionary distance based on structural alignments. The model is illustrated by comparison with well-established methods on several challenging protein alignment examples.
  • We discuss functional clustering procedures for nested designs, where multiple curves are collected for each subject in the study. We start by considering the application of standard functional clustering tools to this problem, which leads to groupings based on the average profile for each subject. After discussing some of the shortcomings of this approach, we present a mixture model based on a generalization of the nested Dirichlet process that clusters subjects based on the distribution of their curves. By using mixtures of generalized Dirichlet processes, the model induces a much more flexible prior on the partition structure than other popular model-based clustering methods, allowing for different rates of introduction of new clusters as the number of observations increases. The methods are illustrated using hormone profiles from multiple menstrual cycles collected for women in the Early Pregnancy Study.
  • We derive the Jeffreys prior for the parameter of the Multivariate Ewens Distribution and study some of its properties. In particular, we show that this prior is proper and has no finite moments. We also investigate the impact of this default prior on the a priori distribution of the number of species and the a priori probability of discovery of a new species, which are usually employed in subjective prior elicitation. The effect of the Jeffreys prior for posterior inference is illustrated using examples arising in the context of inference for species sampling models and Dirichlet process mixture models.
  • We introduce efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for inference and model determination in multivariate and matrix-variate Gaussian graphical models. Our framework is based on the G-Wishart prior for the precision matrix associated with graphs that can be decomposable or non-decomposable. We extend our sampling algorithms to a novel class of conditionally autoregressive models for sparse estimation in multivariate lattice data, with a special emphasis on the analysis of spatial data. These models embed a great deal of flexibility in estimating both the correlation structure across outcomes and the spatial correlation structure, thereby allowing for adaptive smoothing and spatial autocorrelation parameters. Our methods are illustrated using simulated and real-world examples, including an application to cancer mortality surveillance.
  • Standard Gaussian graphical models (GGMs) implicitly assume that the conditional independence among variables is common to all observations in the sample. However, in practice, observations are usually collected form heterogeneous populations where such assumption is not satisfied, leading in turn to nonlinear relationships among variables. To tackle these problems we explore mixtures of GGMs; in particular, we consider both infinite mixture models of GGMs and infinite hidden Markov models with GGM emission distributions. Such models allow us to divide a heterogeneous population into homogenous groups, with each cluster having its own conditional independence structure. The main advantage of considering infinite mixtures is that they allow us easily to estimate the number of number of subpopulations in the sample. As an illustration, we study the trends in exchange rate fluctuations in the pre-Euro era. This example demonstrates that the models are very flexible while providing extremely interesting interesting insights into real-life applications.
  • Mounting empirical evidence suggests that the observed extreme prices within a trading period can provide valuable information about the volatility of the process within that period. In this paper we define a class of stochastic volatility models that uses opening and closing prices along with the minimum and maximum prices within a trading period to infer the dynamics underlying the volatility process of asset prices and compares it with similar models that have been previously presented in the literature. The paper also discusses sequential Monte Carlo algorithms to fit this class of models and illustrates its features using both a simulation study and data form the SP500 index.
  • Extracting market expectations has always been an important issue when making national policies and investment decisions in financial markets. In option markets, the most popular way has been to extract implied volatilities to assess the future variability of the underlying with the use of the Black and Scholes formula. In this manuscript, we propose a novel way to extract the whole time varying distribution of the market implied asset price from option prices. We use a Bayesian nonparametric method that makes use of the Sethuraman representation for Dirichlet processes to take into account the evolution of distributions in time. As an illustration, we present the analysis of options on the SP500 index.