• Efficient magnetic braking is a formidable obstacle to the formation of rotationally supported disks (RSDs) around protostars in magnetized dense cores. We have previously shown, through 2D (axisymmetric) non-ideal MHD simulations, that removing very small grains (VSGs: ~10 \AA$~$to few 100 \AA) can greatly enhance ambipolar diffusion and enable the formation of RSDs. Here we extend the simulations of disk formation enabled by VSG removal to 3D. We find that the key to this scenario of disk formation is that the infall speed of ions (and thus the magnetic field lines tied to them) almost vanishes in the $10^2$-$10^3$ AU-scale "pseudo-disk" where the field lines are most severely pinched and most of protostellar envelope mass infall occurs. As a result, the bulk neutral envelope matter can collapse without dragging much magnetic flux into the disk-forming region, which lowers the magnetic braking efficiency. We find that the initial disks enabled by VSG removal tend to be Toomre-unstable, which leads to the formation of prominent spiral structures that function as centrifugal barriers. The piling-up of infall material near the centrifugal barrier often produces dense fragments of tens of Jupiter masses, especially in cores that are not too strongly magnetized. Some fragments accrete onto the central stellar object, producing bursts in mass accretion rate. Others are longer lived, although whether they can survive long-term to produce multiple systems remains to be ascertained. Our results highlight the importance of dust grain evolution in determining the formation and properties of protostellar disks and potentially multiple systems.
  • Due to instrumental limitations and a lack of disk detections, the structure between the envelope and the rotationally supported disk has been poorly studied. This is now possible with ALMA through observations of CO isotopologs and tracers of freezeout. Class 0 sources are ideal for such studies given their almost intact envelope and young disk. The structure of the disk-envelope interface of the prototypical Class 0 source, VLA1623A which has a confirmed Keplerian disk, is constrained from ALMA observations of DCO+ 3-2 and C18O 2-1. The physical structure of VLA1623 is obtained from the large-scale SED and continuum radiative transfer. An analytic model using a simple network coupled with radial density and temperature profiles is used as input for a 2D line radiative transfer calculation for comparison with the ALMA Cycle 0 12m array and Cycle 2 ACA observations of VLA1623. DCO+ emission shows a clumpy structure bordering VLA1623A's Keplerian disk, suggesting a cold ring-like structure at the disk-envelope interface. The radial position of the observed DCO+ peak is reproduced in our model only if the region's temperature is between 11-16K, lower than expected from models constrained by continuum and SED. Altering the density has little effect on the DCO+ position, but increased density is needed to reproduce the disk traced in C18O. The DCO+ emission around VLA1623A is the product of shadowing of the envelope by the disk. Disk-shadowing causes a drop in the gas temperature outside of the disk on >200AU scales, encouraging deuterated molecule production. This indicates that the physical structure of the disk-envelope interface differs from the rest of the envelope, highlighting the drastic impact that the disk has on the envelope and temperature structure. The results presented here show that DCO+ is an excellent cold temperature tracer.
  • We report here our latest search for molecular outflows from young brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars in nearby star-forming regions. We have observed three sources in Taurus with the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy at 230 GHz frequency to search for CO J=2-1 outflows. We obtain a tentative detection of a redshifted and extended gas lobe at about 10 arcsec from the source GM Tau, a young brown dwarf in Taurus with an estimated mass of 73 M_J, which is right below the hydrogen-burning limit. No blueshifted emission around the brown dwarf position is detected. The redshifted gas lobe that is elongated in the northeast direction suggests a possible bipolar outflow from the source with a position angle of about 36 degrees. Assuming that the redshifted emission is outflow emission from GM Tau, we then estimate a molecular outflow mass in the range from 1.9x10^-6 M_Sun to 2.9x10^-5 M_Sun and an outflow mass-loss rate from 2.7x10^-9 M_Sun yr^-1 to 4.1x10^-8 M_Sun yr^-1. These values are comparable to those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M_J in rho Ophiuchi and the very low-mass star MHO 5 of 90 M_J in Taurus. Our results suggest that the outflow process in very low-mass objects is episodic with duration of a few thousand years and the outflow rate of active episodes does not significantly change for different stages of the formation process of very low-mass objects. This may provide us with important implications that clarify the formation process of brown dwarfs.
  • We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 um dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.5 arcsec, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64+/-0.08 and 0.91+/-0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I YSOs, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among MS stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50+/-0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I YSOs (0.31+/-0.07) and MS stars (< 0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary systems shows a general trend in which companion star fraction increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67%+/-8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation.
  • We present the results of combined NH3(1,1) and (2,2) line emission observed with the Very Large Array and the Effelsberg 100m telescope of the Infrared Dark Cloud G14.225-0.506. The NH3 emission reveals a network of filaments constituting two hub-filament systems. Hubs are associated with gas of rotational temperature Trot \sim 25 K, non-thermal velocity dispersion ~1.1 km/s, and exhibit signs of star formation, while filaments appear to be more quiescent (Trot \sim 11 K, non-thermal velocity dispersion ~0.6 km/s). Filaments are parallel in projection and distributed mainly along two directions, at PA \sim 10 deg and 60 deg, and appear to be coherent in velocity. The averaged projected separation between adjacent filaments is between 0.5 pc and 1pc, and the mean width of filaments is 0.12 pc. Cores within filaments are separated by ~0.33 pc, which is consistent with the predicted fragmentation of an isothermal gas cylinder due to the 'sausage'-type instability. The network of parallel filaments observed in G14.225-0.506 is consistent with the gravitational instability of a thin gas layer threaded by magnetic fields. Overall, our data suggest that magnetic fields might play an important role in the alignment of filaments, and polarization measurements in the entire cloud would lend further support to this scenario.
  • We describe the conceptual design of the camera cryostats, detectors, and detector readout electronics for the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) being developed for the Subaru telescope. The SuMIRe PFS will consist of four identical spectrographs, each receiving 600 fibers from a 2400 fiber robotic positioner at the prime focus. Each spectrograph will have three channels covering wavelength ranges 3800 {\AA} - 6700 {\AA}, 6500 {\AA} - 10000 {\AA}, and 9700 {\AA} - 13000 {\AA}, with the dispersed light being imaged in each channel by a f/1.10 vacuum Schmidt camera. In the blue and red channels a pair of Hamamatsu 2K x 4K edge-buttable CCDs with 15 um pixels are used to form a 4K x 4K array. For the IR channel, the new Teledyne 4K x 4K, 15 um pixel, mercury-cadmium-telluride sensor with substrate removed for short-wavelength response and a 1.7 um cutoff will be used. Identical detector geometry and a nearly identical optical design allow for a common cryostat design with the only notable difference being the need for a cold radiation shield in the IR camera to mitigate thermal background. This paper describes the details of the cryostat design and cooling scheme, relevant thermal considerations and analysis, and discusses the detectors and detector readout electronics.
  • We present CO(3-2) interferometric observations of the central region of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 using the Submillimeter Array, together with CO(1-0) data taken with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Millimeter Array. Both the CO(3-2) and CO(1-0) emission lines are mainly distributed within ~5 arcsec of the nucleus and along the spiral arms, but the intensity distributions show differences; the CO(3-2) map peaks in the nucleus, while the CO(1-0) emission is mainly located along the spiral arms. The CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratio is about 3.1 in the nucleus, which is four times as large as the average line ratio in the spiral arms, suggesting that the molecular gas there must be affected by the radiation arising from the AGN. On the other hand, the line ratios in the spiral arms vary over a wide range from 0.24 to 2.34 with a average value around 0.75, which is similar to the line ratios of star-formation regions, indicating that the molecular gas is affected by star formation. Besides, we see a tight correlation between CO(3-2)/(1-0) ratios in the spiral arms and star formation rate surface densities derived from Spitzer 8 {\mu}m dust flux densities. We also compare the CO(3-2)/(1-0) ratio and the star formation rate at different positions within the spiral arms; both are found to decrease as the radius from the nucleus increases.
  • We present CO(3-2) interferometric observations of the central region of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 using the Submillimeter Array, together with CO(1-0) data taken with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Millimeter Array. Both the CO(3-2) and CO(1-0) emission lines are mainly distributed within ~5 arcsec of the nucleus and along the spiral arms, but the intensity distributions show differences; the CO(3-2) map peaks in the nucleus, while the CO(1-0) emission is mainly located along the spiral arms. The CO(3-2)/CO(1-0) ratio is about 3.1 in the nucleus, which is four times as large as the average line ratio in the spiral arms, suggesting that the molecular gas there must be affected by the radiation arising from the AGN. On the other hand, the line ratios in the spiral arms vary over a wide range from 0.24 to 2.34 with a average value around 0.75, which is similar to the line ratios of star-formation regions, indicating that the molecular gas is affected by star formation. Besides, we see a tight correlation between CO(3-2)/(1-0) ratios in the spiral arms and star formation rate surface densities derived from Spitzer 8 {\mu}m dust flux densities. We also compare the CO(3-2)/(1-0) ratio and the star formation rate at different positions within the spiral arms; both are found to decrease as the radius from the nucleus increases.
  • We apply our technique on the dispersion of magnetic fields in molecular clouds to high spatial resolution Submillimeter Array polarization data obtained for Orion KL in OMC-1, IRAS 16293, and NGC 1333 IRAS 4A. We show how one can take advantage of such high resolution data to characterize the magnetized turbulence power spectrum in the inertial and dissipation ranges. For Orion KL we determine that in the inertial range the spectrum can be approximately fitted with a power law k^-(2.9\pm0.9) and we report a value of 9.9 mpc for {\lambda}_AD, the high spatial frequency cutoff presumably due to turbulent ambipolar diffusion. For the same parameters we have \sim k^-(1.4\pm0.4) and a tentative value of {\lambda}_AD \simeq 2.2 mpc for NGC 1333 IRAS 4A, and \sim k^-(1.8\pm0.3) with an upper limit of {\lambda}_AD < 1.8 mpc for IRAS 16293. We also discuss the application of the technique to interferometry measurements and the effects of the inherent spatial filtering process on the interpretation of the results.
  • We used the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe the thermal polarized dust emission from the protostellar source NGC 2024 FIR 5. The polarized emission outlines a partial hourglass morphology for the plane-of-sky component of the core magnetic field. Our data are consistent with previous BIMA maps, and the overall magnetic field geometries obtained with both instruments are similar. We resolve the main core into two components, FIR 5A and FIR 5B. A possible explanation for the asymmetrical field lies in depolarization effects due to the lack of internal heating from FIR 5B source, which may be in a prestellar evolutionary state. The field strength was estimated to be 2.2 mG, in agreement with previous BIMA data. We discuss the influence of a nearby H{\sc ii} region over the field lines at scales of $\sim 0.01$ pc. Although the hot component is probably compressing the molecular gas where the dust core is embedded, it is unlikely that the radiation pressure exceeds the magnetic tension. Finally, a complex outflow morphology is observed in CO (3 $\rightarrow$ 2) maps. Unlike previous maps, several features associated with dust condensations other than FIR 5 are detected.
  • Interferometric observations of the W33A massive star-formation region, performed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the Very Large Array (VLA) at resolutions from 5 arcsec (0.1 pc) to 0.5 arcsec (0.01 pc) are presented. Our three main findings are: (1) parsec-scale, filamentary structures of cold molecular gas are detected. Two filaments at different velocities intersect in the zone where the star formation is occurring. This is consistent with triggering of the star-formation activity by the convergence of such filaments, as predicted by numerical simulations of star formation initiated by converging flows. (2) The two dusty cores (MM1 and MM2) at the intersection of the filaments are found to be at different evolutionary stages, and each of them is resolved into multiple condensations. MM1 and MM2 have markedly different temperatures, continuum spectral indices, molecular-line spectra, and masses of both stars and gas. (3) The dynamics of the "hot-core" MM1 indicates the presence of a rotating disk in its center (MM1-Main) around a faint free-free source. The stellar mass is estimated to be approximately 10 Msun. A massive molecular outflow is observed along the rotation axis of the disk.
  • We aim at investigating with high angular resolution the NH3/N2H+ ratio toward the high-mass star-forming region AFGL 5142 in order to study whether this ratio behaves similarly to the low-mass case, for which the ratio decreases from starless cores to cores associated with YSOs. CARMA was used to observe the 3.2 mm continuum and N2H+(1-0) emission. We used NH3(1,1) and (2,2), HCO+(1-0) and H13CO+(1-0) data from the literature and we performed a time-dependent chemical modeling of the region. The 3.2 mm continuum emission reveals a dust condensation of ~23 Msun associated with the massive YSOs, deeply embedded in the strongest NH3 core (hereafter central core). The N2H+ emission reveals two main cores, the western and eastern core, located to the west and to the east of the mm condensation, and surrounded by a more extended and complex structure of ~0.5 pc. Toward the central core the N2H+ emission drops significantly, indicating a clear chemical differentiation in the region. We found low values of the NH3/N2H+ ratio ~50-100 toward the western/eastern cores, and high values up to 1000 in the central core. The chemical model indicates that density, and in particular temperature, are key parameters in determining the NH3/N2H+ ratio. The high density and temperature reached in the central core allow molecules like CO to evaporate from grain mantles. The CO desorption causes a significant destruction of N2H+, favoring the formation of HCO+. This result is supported by our observations, which show that N2H+ and HCO+ are anticorrelated in the central core. The observed values of the NH3/N2H+ ratio in the central core can be reproduced by our model for times t~4.5-5.3x10^5 yr (central) and t~10^4-3x10^6 yr (western/eastern). The NH3/N2H+ ratio in AFGL 5142 does not follow the same trend as in regions of low-mass star formation mainly due to the high temperature reached in hot cores.
  • Recent searches by unbiased, wide-field surveys have uncovered a group of extremely luminous optical transients. The initial discoveries of SN 2005ap by the Texas Supernova Search and SCP-06F6 in a deep Hubble pencil beam survey were followed by the Palomar Transient Factory confirmation of host redshifts for other similar transients. The transients share the common properties of high optical luminosities (peak magnitudes ~ -21 to -23), blue colors, and a lack of H or He spectral features. The physical mechanism that produces the luminosity is uncertain, with suggestions ranging from jet-driven explosion to pulsational pair-instability. Here we report the most detailed photometric and spectral coverage of an ultra-bright transient (SN 2010gx) detected in the Pan-STARRS 1 sky survey. In common with other transients in this family, early-time spectra show a blue continuum, and prominent broad absorption lines of O II. However, about 25d after discovery, the spectra developed type Ic supernova features, showing the characteristic broad Fe II and Si II absorption lines. Detailed, post-maximum follow-up may show that all SN 2005ap and SCP-06F6 type transients are linked to supernovae Ic. This poses problems in understanding the physics of the explosions: there is no indication from late-time photometry that the luminosity is powered by 56Ni, the broad lightcurves suggest very large ejected masses, and the slow spectral evolution is quite different from typical Ic timescales. The nature of the progenitor stars and the origin of the luminosity are intriguing and open questions.
  • The HH 24 MMS protostellar system was observed in the 6.9 mm continuum with a high angular resolution (0.5"). HH 24 MMS was resolved into two sources. The separation between sources 1 and 2 is ~0.9" or 360 AU. The spectral energy distribution suggests that the 6.9 mm flux is almost entirely from dust. The 6.9 mm image and the spectrum suggest that HH 24 MMS may be a protostellar binary system. Total mass including the accretion disks and the inner protostellar envelope is ~1.4 Msun. Disk masses of sources 1 and 2 are 0.6 and 0.3 Msun, respectively. Both sources are highly elongated. The difference in the position angle of the two disks is ~45 degree, which means that HH 24 MMS is a highly misaligned protobinary system. The misalignment suggests that turbulent fragmentation may be the formation mechanism relevant to the binary systems with a separation of a few hundreds of AU, such as the HH 24 MMS system.
  • We report results of pentachromatic VLBI survey for 18 GHz-peaked spectrum sources. Spectral fitting at every pixel across five frequencies allows us to illustrate distribution of optical depth in terms of free-free absorption or synchrotron self absorption. Quasars and Seyfert 1 sources show one-sided morphology with a core at the end where the optical depth peaks. Radio galaxies and Seyfert 2 show symmetric double-sided jets with a optically thick core at the center.
  • Recently, we have developed and calibrated the Synthetic Field Method to derive total extinction through disk galaxies. The method is based on the number counts and colors of distant background field galaxies that can be seen through the foreground object. Here, we investigate how large (10-m) and very large (20 to 30-m), diffraction-limited, optical and infrared telescopes in space would improve the detection of background galaxies behind Local Group objects, including the Galactic bulge. We find that, besides and perhaps more important than telescope size, a well-behaved, well-characterized PSF would facilitate in general the detection of faint objects in crowded fields, and greatly benefit several other important research areas, like the search for extrasolar planets, the study of quasar hosts and, most relevant for this meeting, the surveying of nearby large scale structure in the Zone of Avoidance, in particular behind the Galactic bulge.
  • An improved linear stability theory of small-amplitude oscillations of a self-gravitating, infinitesimally thin gaseous disk of spiral galaxies has been developed. It was shown that in the differentially rotating disks for nonaxisymmetric perturbations Toomre's modified hydrodynamical simulations to test the validity of the modified local criterion.
  • The kinetic theory is used to study the evolution of the self-gravitating disk of planetesimals. The effects of frequent collisions between planetesimals are taken into account by using a Krook integral in the Boltzmann kinetic equation. It is shown that as a result of an aperiodic collision-dissipative instability of small gravity disturbances the disk is subdivided into numerous dense fragments. These can eventually condense into the planetary sequence.