• Stellar evolution codes play a major role in present-day astrophysics, yet they share common issues. In this work we seek to remedy some of those by the use of results from realistic and highly detailed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres. We have implemented a new temperature stratification extracted directly from the 3D simulations into the Garching Stellar Evolution Code to replace the simplified atmosphere normally used. Secondly, we have implemented the use of a variable mixing-length parameter, which changes as a function of the stellar surface gravity and temperature -- also derived from the 3D simulations. Furthermore, to make our models consistent, we have calculated new opacity tables to match the atmospheric simulations. Here, we present the modified code and initial results on stellar evolution using it.
  • Solar p-mode oscillations exhibit a systematic offset towards higher frequencies due to shortcomings in the 1D stellar structure models, especially, the lack of turbulent pressure in the superadiabatic layers just below the optical surface, arising from the convective velocity field. We study the influence of the turbulent expansion, chemical composition, and magnetic fields on the stratification in the upper layers of the solar models in comparison with solar observations. Furthermore, we test alternative <3D> averages for improved results on the oscillation frequencies. We appended temporally and spatially averaged <3D> stratifications to 1D models to compute adiabatic oscillation frequencies that we then tested against observations. We also developed depth-dependent corrections for the solar 1D model, for which we expanded the geometrical depth to match the pressure stratification of the solar <3D> model, and we reduced the density that is caused by the turbulent pressure. We obtain the same results with our <3D> models as have been reported previously. Our depth-dependent corrected 1D models match the observations to almost a similar extent as the <3D> model. We find that correcting for the expansion of the geometrical depth and the reducing of the density are both equally necessary. Interestingly, the influence of the adiabatic exponent Gam1 is less pronounced than anticipated. The turbulent elevation directly from the <3D> model does not match the observations properly. Considering different reference depth scales for the <3D> averaging leads to very similar frequencies. Solar models with high metal abundances in their initial chemical composition match the low-frequency part much better. We find a linear relation between the p-mode frequency shift and the vertical magnetic field strength with dvnl = 26.21Bz microHz/kG, which is able to render the solar activity cycles correctly.
  • Recently Pasetto et al. have proposed a new method to derive a convection theory appropriate for the implementation in stellar evolution codes. Their approach is based on the simple physical picture of spherical bubbles moving within a potential flow in dynamically unstable regions, and a detailed computation of the bubble dynamics. Based on this approach the authors derive a new theory of convection which is claimed to be parameter free, non-local and time-dependent. This is a very strong claim, as such a theory is the holy grail of stellar physics. Unfortunately we have identified several distinct problems in the derivation which ultimately render their theory inapplicable to any physical regime. In addition we show that the framework of spherical bubbles in potential flows is unable to capture the essence of stellar convection, even when equations are derived correctly.
  • We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, s_bot, and the entropy jump, {\Delta}s, determined from the 3D RHD models, are matched with the mixing length parameter, {\alpha}_MLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derive the mass mixing length, {\alpha}_m, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[v_z,v_z], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is {\alpha}_MLT (s_bot) = 1.98. For different stellar parameters, {\alpha}_MLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, {\alpha}_MLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity. We find equivalent results for {\alpha}_MLT ({\Delta}s). Also, we find a tight correlation between the mixing length parameter and the inverse entropy jump. We derive an analytical expression from the hydrodynamic mean field equations that motivates the relation to the mass mixing length, {\alpha}_m, and find that it exhibits qualitatively a similar variation with stellar parameter (between 1.6 and 2.4) with a solar value of {\alpha}_m = 1.83. The vertical correlation length scaled with the pressure scale height yields for the Sun 1.71, but displays only a small systematic variation with stellar parameters, the correlation length slightly increasing with Teff. We derive mixing length parameters for various stellar parameters that can be used to replace a constant value. Within any convective envelope, {\alpha}_m and related quantities vary a lot.
  • The red-giant branch (RGB) in globular clusters is extended to larger brightness if the degenerate helium core loses too much energy in "dark channels." Based on a large set of archival observations, we provide high-precision photometry for the Galactic globular cluster M5 (NGC 5904), allowing for a detailed comparison between the observed tip of the RGB with predictions based on contemporary stellar evolution theory. In particular, we derive 95% confidence limits of $g_{ae}<4.3\times10^{-13}$ on the axion-electron coupling and $\mu_\nu<4.5\times10^{-12}\,\mu_{\rm B}$ (Bohr magneton $\mu_{\rm B}=e/2m_e$) on a neutrino dipole moment, based on a detailed analysis of statistical and systematic uncertainties. The cluster distance is the single largest source of uncertainty and can be improved in the future.
  • Stellar evolution is modified if energy is lost in a "dark channel" similar to neutrino emission. Comparing modified stellar evolution sequences with observations provides some of the most restrictive limits on axions and other hypothetical low-mass particles and on non-standard neutrino properties. In particular, a putative neutrino magnetic dipole moment mu_nu enhances the plasmon decay process, postpones helium ignition in low-mass stars, and therefore extends the red-giant branch (RGB) in globular clusters (GCs). The brightness of the tip of the RGB (TRGB) remains the most sensitive probe for mu_nu and we revisit this argument from a modern perspective. Based on a large set of archival observations, we provide high-precision photometry for the Galactic GC M5 (NGC5904) and carefully determine its TRGB position. On the theoretical side, we add the extra plasmon decay rate brought about by mu_nu to the Princeton-Goddard-PUC stellar evolution code. Different sources of uncertainty are critically examined. The main source of systematic uncertainty is the bolometric correction and the main statistical uncertainty derives from the distance modulus based on main-sequence fitting. (Other measures of distance, e.g., the brightness of RR Lyrae stars, are influenced by the energy loss that we wish to constrain.) The statistical uncertainty of the TRGB position relative to the brightest RGB star is less important because the RGB is well populated. We infer an absolute I-band brightness of M_I=-4.17+/-0.13 mag for the TRGB compared with the theoretical prediction of -3.99+/-0.07 mag, in reasonable agreement with each other. A significant brightness increase caused by neutrino dipole moments is constrained such that mu_nu<2.6x10^-12mu_B(68% CL), where mu_B is the Bohr magneton, and mu_nu<4.5x10^-12 mu_B(95% CL). In these results, statistical and systematic errors have been combined in quadrature.
  • Extremely metal-poor low-mass stars experience an ingestion of protons into the helium-rich layer during the core He-flash, resulting in the production of neutrons through the reactions ^{12}C(p,\gamma)^{13}N(\beta)^{13}C(\alpha,n)^{16}O. This is a potential site for the production of s-process elements in extremely metal-poor stars not occurring in more metal-rich counterparts. Observationally, the signatures of s-process elements in the two most iron deficient stars observed to date, HE1327-2326 & HE0107-5240, still await for an explanation. We investigate the possibility that low-mass EMP stars could be the source of s-process elements observed in extremely iron deficient stars, either as a result of self-enrichment or in a binary scenario as the consequence of a mass transfer episode. We present evolutionary and post-processing s-process calculations of a 1Msun stellar model with metallicities Z=0, 10^{-8} and 10^{-7}. We assess the sensitivity of nucleosynthesis results to uncertainties in the input physics of the stellar models, particularly regarding the details of convective mixing during the core He-flash. Our models provide the possibility of explaining the C, O, Sr, and Ba abundance for the star HE0107-5240 as the result of mass-transfer from a low-mass EMP star. The drawback of our model is that if mass would be transferred before the primary star enters the AGB phase, nitrogen would be overproduced and the ^{12}C/^{13}C abundance ratio would be underproduced in comparison to the observed values. Our results show that low-mass EMP stars cannot be ruled out as the companion stars that might have polluted HE1327-2326 & HE0107-5240 and produced the observed s-process pattern. However, more detailed studies of the core He-flash and the proton ingestion episode are needed to determine the robustness of our predictions.
  • The evolution of low- and intermediate mass stars at the onset and during core helium burning is reviewed. Particular emphasis is laid on structural differences, which may allow to identify a star's nature and evolutionary phase in spite of the fact that it is found in a region of the Hertzsprung-Russell-Diagram objects from both mass ranges may populate. Seismic diagnostics which are sensitive to the temperature and density profile at the border of the helium core and outside of it may be the most promising tool.
  • We determined the age of the stellar content of the Galactic halo by considering main-sequence turn-off stars. From the large number of halo stars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we could accurately detect the turn-off as a function of metallicity of the youngest dominant population, which was done by looking at the hottest (bluest) stars of a population. Using the turn-off temperature of a population of a given metallicity, we looked for the isochrones with that turn-off temperature and metallicity and found no age gradient as a function of metallicity. This would mean that this dominating population of the Galactic halo formed rapidly, probably during the collapse of the proto-Galactic gas. Moreover, we could find a significant number of stars with hotter temperatures than the turn-off, which might be blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars, blue stragglers, or main sequence stars that are younger than the dominant population and were probably formed in external galaxies and accreted later on to our Milky Way. Motivated by the current debate about the efficiency of gravitational settling (atomic diffusion) in the interior of old solar-type stars, we used isochrones with and without settling to determine the ages. When ignoring diffusion in the isochrones we obtained ages of 14-16 Gyr. This result is a strong argument against inhibited diffusion in old halo field stars, since it results in a serious conflict with the age of the Universe of 13.7 Gyr. The age obtained including diffusion in the isochrones was 10-12 Gyr, which agrees with the absolute age of the old globular clusters in the inner halo.
  • MAx is a new tool to estimate parameters from stellar spectra. It is based on the maximum likelihood method, with the likelihood compressed in a way that the information stored in the spectral fluxes is conserved. The compressed data are given by the size of the number of parameters, rather than by the number of flux points. The optimum speed-up reached by the compression is the ratio of the data set to the number of parameters. The method has been tested on a sample of low-resolution spectra from the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE) survey for the estimate of metallicity, effective temperature and surface gravity, with accuracies of 0.24 dex, 130K and 0.5 dex, respectively. Our stellar parameters and those recovered by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline agree reasonably well. A small sample of high-resolution VLT-UVES spectra were also used to test the method and the results have been compared to a more classical approach. The speed and multi-resolution capability of MAx combined with its performance compared with other methods indicates that it will be a useful tool for the analysis of upcoming spectral surveys.
  • The open cluster M67 has solar metallicity and an age of about 4Gyr. The turn-off mass is close to the minimum mass for which solar metallicity stars develop a convective core during main sequence evolution as a result of the development of hydrogen burning through the CNO-cycle. The morphology of the color-magnitude-diagram (CMD) of M67 around the turn-off shows a clear hook-like feature, direct sign that stars close to the turn-off have convective cores. VandenBerg et al. investigated the possibility of using the morphology of the M67 turn-off to put constraints on the solar metallicity, particularly CNO elements, for which solar abundances have been revised downwards by more than 30% over the last few years. Here, we extend their work filling in the gaps in their analysis. To this aim, we compute isochrones appropriate for M67 using new (low metallicity) and old (high metallicity) solar abundances and study whether the characteristic turn-off in the CMD of M67 can be reproduced or not. We also study the importance of other constitutive physics on determining the presence of such a hook, particularly element diffusion, overshooting and nuclear reaction rates. We find that using the new solar abundance determinations, with low CNO abundances, makes it more difficult to reproduce the characteristic CMD of M67. This result is in agreement with results by VandenBerg et al. However, changes in the constitutive physics of the models, particularly overshooting, can influence and alter this result to the extent that isochrones constructed with models using low CNO solar abundances can also reproduce the turn-off morphology in M67. We conclude that only if all factors affecting the turn-off morphology are completely under control (and this is not the case), M67 could be used to put constraints on solar abundances.
  • Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819 -- one of four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation and the frequency of maximum oscillation power. We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster-membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about two orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.
  • We present a new grid of stellar model calculations for stars on the Asymptotic Giant Branch between 1.0 and 6.0 M_sun. Our grid consists of 5 chemical mixtures between Z=0.0005 and Z=0.04, with both solar-like and $\alpha$-element enhanced metal ratios. We treat consistently the carbon-enhancement of the stellar envelopes by using opacity tables with varying C/O-ratio and by employing theoretical mass loss rates for carbon stars. The low temperature opacities have been calculated specifically for this project. For oxygen stars we use an empirical mass loss formalism. The third dredge-up is naturally obtained by including convective overshooting. Our models reach effective temperatures in agreement with earlier synthetic models, which included approximative carbon-enriched molecular opacities and show good agreement with empirically determined carbon-star lifetimes. A fraction of the models could be followed into the post-AGB phase, for which we provide models in a mass range supplementing previous post-AGB calculations. Our grid constitutes the most extensive set of AGB-models, calculated with the latest physical input data and treating carbon-enhancement due to the third dredge-up most consistently.
  • Using the most recent results about white dwarfs in 10 open clusters, we revisit semi-empirical estimates of the initial-final mass relation in star clusters, with emphasis on the use of stellar evolution models. We discuss the influence of these models on each step of the derivation. One intention of our work is to use consistent sets of calculations both for the isochrones and the white dwarf cooling tracks. The second one is to derive the range of systematic errors arising from stellar evolution theory. This is achieved by using different sources for the stellar models and by varying physical assumptions and input data. We find that systematic errors, including the determination of the cluster age, are dominating the initial mass values, while observational uncertainties influence the final mass primarily. After having determined the systematic errors, the initial-final mass relation allows us finally to draw conclusions about the physics of the stellar models, in particular about convective overshooting.
  • We compare stellar models produced by different stellar evolution codes for the CoRoT/ESTA project, comparing their global quantities, their physical structure, and their oscillation properties. We discuss the differences between models and identify the underlying reasons for these differences. The stellar models are representative of potential CoRoT targets. Overall we find very good agreement between the five different codes, but with some significant deviations. We find noticeable discrepancies (though still at the per cent level) that result from the handling of the equation of state, of the opacities and of the convective boundaries. The results of our work will be helpful in interpreting future asteroseismology results from CoRoT.
  • We present a grid of evolutionary calculations for metal-poor low-mass stars for a variety of initial helium and metal abundances. The intention is mainly to provide a database for deriving directly stellar ages of halo and globular cluster stars for which basic stellar parameters are known, but the tracks can also be used for isochrone or luminosity function construction, since they extend to the tip of the red giant branch. Fitting formulae for age-luminosity relations are provided as well. The uncertainties of the evolutionary ages due to inherent shortcomings in the models and due to the unclear effectiveness of diffusion are discussed. A first application to field single stars is presented.
  • We have calculated the evolution of low metallicity red giant stars under the assumption of deep mixing between the convective envelope and the hydrogen burning shell. We find that the extent of the observed abundance anomalies, and in particular the universal O-Na anticorrelation, can be totally explained by mixing which does not lead to significant helium enrichment of the envelope. On the other hand, models with extremely deep mixing and strong helium enrichment predict anomalies of sodium and oxygen, which are much larger than the observed ones. This latter result depends solely on the nucleosynthesis inside the hydrogen burning shell, but not on the details of the mixing descriptions. These, however, influence the evolution of surface abundances with brightness, which we compare with the limited observational material available. Our models allow, nevertheless, to infer details on the depth and speed of the mixing process in several clusters. Models with strong helium enrichment evolve to high luminosities and show an increased mass loss. However, under peculiar assumptions, red giants reach very high luminosities even without extreme helium mixing. Due to the consequently increased mass loss, such models could be candidates for blue horizontal branch stars, and, at the same time, would be consistent with the observed abundance anomalies.
  • Reliable temperature-colour transformations are a necessary ingredient for isochrones to be compared with observed colour-magnitude-diagrams of globular clusters. We show that both theoretical and empirical published transformations to (V-I) to a large extend exhibit significant differences between them. Based on these comparisons we argue for particular transformations for dwarfs and giants to be preferred. We then show that our selected combination of transformations results in fits of V-(V-I)-CMDs of a quality which is comparable to that of our earlier V-(B-V) isochrones for a wide range of cluster metallicities. The cluster parameters, such as reddening, are consistent with those derived in (B-V). Therefore, at least in the case of the fit with our own isochrones - based on the particular distance scale provided by our own horizontal branch models, and on the treatment of convection by the mixing-length theory having l/H_p calibrated on our solar model - the chosen transformations appear to lead to self-consistent (V-I) isochrones. Our isochrones are now well tested and self-consistent for B, V and I photometric data.
  • Helioseismological sound-speed profiles severely constrain possible deviations from standard solar models, allowing us to derive new limits on anomalous solar energy losses by the Primakoff emission of axions. For an axion-photon coupling $g_{a\gamma} < 5 x 10^(-10) GeV^(-1)$ the solar model is almost indistinguishable from the standard case, while $g_{a\gamma} > 10 x 10^(-10) GeV^(-1)$ is probably excluded, corresponding to an axion luminosity of about $0.20 L_(sun)$. This constraint on $g_{a\gamma}$ is much weaker than the well-known globular-cluster limit, but about a factor of 3 more restrictive than previous solar limits. Our result is primarily of interest to the large number of current or proposed search experiments for solar axions because our limit defines the maximum g_{a\gamma}$ for which it is self-consistent to use a standard solar model to calculate the axion luminosity.
  • New age determinations of the galactic disk globular clusters 47 Tuc, M71 and NGC6352 have been performed with our up-to-date alpha-enhanced stellar models. We find that all three clusters are about 9.2 Gyr old and therefore coeval with the oldest disk white dwarfs. Several arguments are presented which indicate that the initial helium content of the stars populating these clusters is close to the solar one. We also revisit a total of 28 halo clusters, for which we use an updated [Fe/H] scale. This new metallicity scale leads on average to an age reduction of around 0.8 Gyr relative to our previous results. We compare the predicted cluster distances, which result from our dating method, with the most recent distances based on HIPPARCOS parallaxes of local subdwarfs. We further demonstrate that for the most metal-rich clusters scaled-solar isochrones no longer can be used to replace alpha-enhanced ones at the same total metallicity. The implications of the presented age determinations are discussed in the context of the formation history of the Galaxy.
  • We address the question how accurately stellar ages can be determined by stellar evolution theory. We select the star with the best observational material available - our Sun. We determine the solar age by fitting solar evolution models to a number of observational quantities including several obtained from helioseismology, such as photospheric helium abundance or p-mode frequencies. Different cases with respect to the number of free parameters and that of the observables to be fitted are investigated. Age is one of the free parameters determined by the procedure. We find that the neglect of hydrogen-helium-diffusion leads to ages deviating by up to 100% from the true, meteoritic solar age. Our best models including diffusion yield ages by about 10% too high. The implication for general stellar age determination is that a higher accuracy than that can not be expected, even with the most up-to-date models. Our results also confirm that diffusion as treated presently in solar models is slightly too effective.
  • We construct a sample of numerical models for clusters of galaxies and employ these to investigate their capability of imaging background sources into long arcs. Emphasis is laid on the statistics of these arcs. We study cross sections for arc length and length-to-width ratio and optical depths for these arc properties, we examine the distribution of arc widths and curvature radii among long arcs, and we compare these results to predictions based on simplified (radially symmetric) cluster models. We find that the capability of the numerically modeled clusters to produce long arcs is larger by about two orders of magnitude than that of spherically symmetric cluster models with the same observable parameters (core radii and velocity dispersions), and that they are similarly efficient as singular isothermal spheres with the same velocity-dispersion distribution. The influence of source ellipticity is also investigated; we find that the optical depth for arcs with a length-to-width ratio $\ga10$ is significantly larger for elliptical than for circular sources. Given these results, we conclude that spherically symmetric lens models for galaxy clusters, adapted to the observable parameters of these clusters, grossly underestimate the frequency of long arcs. We attribute this difference between numerically constructed and simplified analytical lens models to the abundance and the extent of intrinsic asymmetry and to substructure in galaxy clusters.