• In this study we present the exploration of $\sim$500 spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in and around two large scale structures at $z\sim1$ drawn from the ORELSE survey. A sub-sample of these galaxies ($\sim$150) were targeted for the initial phases of a near-infrared MOSFIRE spectroscopic campaign investigating the differences in selections of galaxies which had recently ended a burst of star formation or had rapidly quenched (i.e., post-starburst or K+A galaxies). Selection with MOSFIRE resulted in a post-starburst sample more than double that selected by traditional $z\sim1$ (observed-frame optical) methods even after the removal of the relatively large fraction of dusty starburst galaxies selected through traditional methods. While the traditional post-starburst fraction increased with increased global density, the MOSFIRE-selected post-starburst fraction was found to be constant in field, group, and cluster environments. However, this fraction relative to the number of galaxies with ongoing star formation was observed to elevate in the cluster environment. Post-starbursts selected with MOSFIRE were predominantly found to exhibit moderately strong [OII] emission originating from activity other than star formation. Such galaxies, termed K+A with ImposteR [OII]-derived Star formation (KAIROS) galaxies, were found to be considerably younger than traditionally-selected post-starbursts and likely undergoing some form of feedback absent or diminished in traditional post-starbursts. A comparison between the environments of the two types of post-starbursts suggests a picture in which the evolution of a post-starburst galaxy is considerably different in cluster environments than in the more rarefied environments of a group or the field.
  • We investigate the relationship between the black hole accretion rate (BHAR) and star-formation rate (SFR) for Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31)-mass progenitors from z = 0.2 - 2.5. We source galaxies from the Ks-band selected ZFOURGE survey, which includes multi-wavelenth data spanning 0.3 - 160um. We use decomposition software to split the observed SEDs of our galaxies into their active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming components, which allows us to estimate BHARs and SFRs from the infrared (IR). We perform tests to check the robustness of these estimates, including a comparison to BHARs and SFRs derived from X-ray stacking and far-IR analysis, respectively. We find as the progenit- ors evolve, their relative black hole-galaxy growth (i.e. their BHAR/SFR ratio) increases from low to high redshift. The MW-mass progenitors exhibit a log-log slope of 0.64 +/- 0.11, while the M31-mass progenitors are 0.39 +/- 0.08. This result contrasts with previous studies that find an almost flat slope when adopting X-ray/AGN-selected or mass-limited samples and is likely due to their use of a broad mixture of galaxies with different evolutionary histories. Our use of progenitor-matched samples highlights the potential importance of carefully selecting progenitors when searching for evolutionary relationships between BHAR/SFRs. Additionally, our finding that BHAR/SFR ratios do not track the rate at which progenitors quench casts doubts over the idea that the suppression of star-formation is predominantly driven by luminous AGN feedback (i.e. high BHARs).
  • We investigate the impact of local environment on the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) spanning a wide range of galaxy densities from the field up to dense cores of massive galaxy clusters. Data are drawn from a sample of eight fields from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) survey. Deep photometry allow us to select mass-complete samples of galaxies down to 10^9 Msol. Taking advantage of >4000 secure spectroscopic redshifts from ORELSE and precise photometric redshifts, we construct 3-dimensional density maps between 0.55<z<1.3 using a Voronoi tessellation approach. We find that the shape of the SMF depends strongly on local environment exhibited by a smooth, continual increase in the relative numbers of high- to low-mass galaxies towards denser environments. A straightforward implication is that local environment proportionally increases the efficiency of (a) destroying lower-mass galaxies and/or (b) growth of higher-mass galaxies. We also find a presence of this environmental dependence in the SMFs of star-forming and quiescent galaxies, although not quite as strongly for the quiescent subsample. To characterize the connection between the SMF of field galaxies and that of denser environments we devise a simple semi-empirical model. The model begins with a sample of ~10^6 galaxies at z_start=5 with stellar masses distributed according to the field. Simulated galaxies then evolve down to z_final=0.8 following empirical prescriptions for star-formation, quenching, and galaxy-galaxy merging. We run the simulation multiple times, testing a variety of scenarios with differing overall amounts of merging. Our model suggests that a large number of mergers are required to reproduce the SMF in dense environments. Additionally, a large majority of these mergers would have to occur in intermediate density environments (e.g. galaxy groups).
  • In this study we investigate 89 radio galaxies that are spectroscopically-confirmed to be members of five large scale structures in the redshift range of $0.65 \le z \le 0.96$. Based on a two-stage classification scheme, the radio galaxies are classified into three sub-classes: active galactic nucleus (AGN), hybrid, and star-forming galaxy (SFG). We study the properties of the three radio sub-classes and their global and local environmental preferences. We find AGN hosts are the most massive population and exhibit quiescence in their star-formation activity. The SFG population has a comparable stellar mass to those hosting a radio AGN but are unequivocally powered by star formation. Hybrids, though selected as an intermediate population in our classification scheme, were found in almost all analyses to be a unique type of radio galaxies rather than a mixture of AGN and SFGs. They are dominated by a high-excitation radio galaxy (HERG) population. We discuss environmental effects and scenarios for each sub-class. AGN tend to be preferentially located in locally dense environments and in the cores of clusters/groups, with these preferences persisting when comparing to galaxies of similar colour and stellar mass, suggesting that their activity may be ignited in the cluster/group virialized core regions. Conversely, SFGs exhibit a strong preference for intermediate-density global environments, suggesting that dusty starbursting activity in LSSs is largely driven by galaxy-galaxy interactions and merging.
  • We examine the effects of an impending cluster merger on galaxies in the large scale structure (LSS) RX J0910 at $z =1.105$. Using multi-wavelength data, including 102 spectral members drawn from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments (ORELSE) survey and precise photometric redshifts, we calculate star formation rates and map the specific star formation rate density of the LSS galaxies. These analyses along with an investigation of the color-magnitude properties of LSS galaxies indicate lower levels of star formation activity in the region between the merging clusters relative to the outskirts of the system. We suggest that gravitational tidal forces due to the potential of the merging halos may be the physical mechanism responsible for the observed suppression of star formation in galaxies caught between the merging clusters.
  • We build a set of composite galaxy SEDs by de-redshifting and scaling multi-wavelength photometry from galaxies in the ZFOURGE survey, covering the CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS fields. From a sample of ~4000 K_s-band selected galaxies, we define 38 composite galaxy SEDs that yield continuous low-resolution spectra (R~45) over the rest-frame range 0.1-4 um. Additionally, we include far infrared photometry from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory to characterize the infrared properties of our diverse set of composite SEDs. From these composite SEDs we analyze the rest-frame UVJ colors, as well as the ratio of IR to UV light (IRX) and the UV slope ($\beta$) in the IRX$-\beta$ dust relation at 1<z<3. Blue star-forming composite SEDs show IRX and $\beta$ values consistent with local relations; dusty star-forming galaxies have considerable scatter, as found for local IR bright sources, but on average appear bluer than expected for their IR fluxes. We measure a tight linear relation between rest-frame UVJ colors and dust attenuation for star-forming composites, providing a direct method for estimating dust content from either (U-V) or (V-J) rest-frame colors for star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts.
  • We investigate active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates within the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) to determine the impact they have on star-formation in their host galaxies. We first identify a population of radio, X-ray, and infrared-selected AGN by cross-matching the deep $K_{s}$-band imaging of ZFOURGE with overlapping multi-wavelength data. From this, we construct a mass-complete (log(M$_{*}$/M$_{\odot}$) $\ge$ 9.75), AGN luminosity limited sample of 235 AGN hosts over z = 0.2 - 3.2. We compare the rest-frame U - V versus V - J (UVJ) colours and specific star-formation rates (sSFRs) of the AGN hosts to a mass-matched control sample of inactive (non-AGN) galaxies. UVJ diagnostics reveal AGN tend to be hosted in a lower fraction of quiescent galaxies and a higher fraction of dusty galaxies than the control sample. Using 160{\mu}m Herschel PACS data, we find the mean specific star-formation rate of AGN hosts to be elevated by 0.34$\pm$0.07 dex with respect to the control sample across all redshifts. This offset is primarily driven by infrared-selected AGN, where the mean sSFR is found to be elevated by as much as a factor of ~5. The remaining population, comprised predominantly of X-ray AGN hosts, is found mostly consistent with inactive galaxies, exhibiting only a marginal elevation. We discuss scenarios that may explain these findings and postulate that AGN are less likely to be a dominant mechanism for moderating galaxy growth via quenching than has previously been suggested.
  • We measure the evolution of the quiescent fraction and quenching efficiency of satellites around star-forming and quiescent central galaxies with stellar mass $\log(M_{\mathrm{cen}}/M_{\odot})>10.5$ at $0.3<z<2.5$. We combine imaging from three deep near-infrared-selected surveys (ZFOURGE/CANDELS, UDS, and UltraVISTA), which allows us to select a stellar-mass complete sample of satellites with $\log(M_{\mathrm{sat}}/M_{\odot})>9.3$. Satellites for both star-forming and quiescent central galaxies have higher quiescent fractions compared to field galaxies matched in stellar mass at all redshifts. We also observe "galactic conformity": satellites around quiescent centrals are more likely to be quenched compared to the satellites around star-forming centrals. In our sample, this conformity signal is significant at $\gtrsim3\sigma$ for $0.6<z<1.6$, whereas it is only weakly significant at $0.3<z<0.6$ and $1.6<z<2.5$. Therefore, conformity (and therefore satellite quenching) has been present for a significant fraction of the age of the universe. The satellite quenching efficiency increases with increasing stellar mass of the central, but does not appear to depend on the stellar mass of the satellite to the mass limit of our sample. When we compare the satellite quenching efficiency of star-forming centrals with stellar masses 0.2 dex higher than quiescent centrals (which should account for any difference in halo mass), the conformity signal decreases, but remains statistically significant at $0.6<z<0.9$. This is evidence that satellite quenching is connected to the star-formation properties of the central as well as to the mass of the halo. We discuss physical effects that may contribute to galactic conformity, and emphasize that they must allow for continued star-formation in the central galaxy even as the satellites are quenched.
  • We explore star-formation histories (SFHs) of galaxies based on the evolution of the star-formation rate stellar mass relation (SFR-M*). Using data from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) in combination with far-IR imaging from the Spitzer and Herschel observatories we measure the SFR-M* relation at 0.5 < z < 4. Similar to recent works we find that the average infrared SEDs of galaxies are roughly consistent with a single infrared template across a broad range of redshifts and stellar masses, with evidence for only weak deviations. We find that the SFR-M* relation is not consistent with a single power-law of the form SFR ~ M*^a at any redshift; it has a power-law slope of a~1 at low masses, and becomes shallower above a turnover mass (M_0) that ranges from 10^9.5 - 10^10.8 Msol, with evidence that M_0 increases with redshift. We compare our measurements to results from state-of-the-art cosmological simulations, and find general agreement in the slope of the SFR-M* relation albeit with systematic offsets. We use the evolving SFR-M* sequence to generate SFHs, finding that typical SFRs of individual galaxies rise at early times and decline after reaching a peak. This peak occurs earlier for more massive galaxies. We integrate these SFHs to generate mass-growth histories and compare to the implied mass-growth from the evolution of the stellar mass function. We find that these two estimates are in broad qualitative agreement, but that there is room for improvement at a more detailed level. At early times the SFHs suggest mass-growth rates that are as much as 10x higher than inferred from the stellar mass function. However, at later times the SFHs under-predict the inferred evolution, as is expected in the case of additional growth due to mergers.
  • There is ongoing debate regarding the extent that environment affects galaxy size growth beyond z>1. To investigate the differences in star-forming and quiescent galaxy properties as a function of environment at z=2.1, we create a mass-complete sample of 59 cluster galaxies Spitler et al. (2012) and 478 field galaxies with log(M)>9 using photometric redshifts from the ZFOURGE survey. We compare the mass-size relation of field and cluster galaxies using measured galaxy semi-major axis half-light radii ($r_{1/2,maj}$) from CANDELS HST/F160W imaging. We find consistent mass normalized (log(M)=10.7) sizes for quiescent field galaxies ($r_{1/2,maj}=1.81\pm0.29$ kpc) and quiescent cluster galaxies ($r_{1/2,maj}=2.17\pm0.63$ kpc). The mass normalized size of star-forming cluster galaxies ($r_{1/2,maj}=4.00\pm0.26$ kpc ) is 12% larger (KS test $2.1\sigma$) than star-forming field galaxies ($r_{1/2,maj}=3.57\pm0.10$ kpc). From the mass-color relation we find that quiescent field galaxies with 9.7<log(M)<10.4 are slightly redder (KS test $3.6\sigma$) than quiescent cluster galaxies, while cluster and field quiescent galaxies with log(M)>10.4 have consistent colors. We find that star-forming cluster galaxies are on average 20% redder than star-forming field galaxies at all masses. Furthermore, we stack galaxy images to measure average radial color profiles as a function of mass. Negative color gradients are only present for massive star-forming field and cluster galaxies with log(M)>10.4, the remaining galaxy masses and types have flat profiles. Our results suggest given the observed differences in size and color of star-forming field and cluster galaxies, that the environment has begun to influence/accelerate their evolution. However, the lack of differences between field and cluster quiescent galaxies indicates that the environment has not begun to significantly influence their evolution at z~2.
  • We study the statistical distribution of satellites around star-forming and quiescent central galaxies at 1<z<3 using imaging from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) and the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). The deep near-IR data select satellites down to $\log(M/M_\odot)>9$ at z<3. The radial satellite distribution around centrals is consistent with a projected NFW profile. Massive quiescent centrals, $\log(M/M_\odot)>10.78$, have $\sim$2 times the number of satellites compared to star-forming centrals with a significance of 2.7$\sigma$ even after accounting for differences in the centrals' stellar-mass distributions. We find no statistical difference in the satellite distributions of intermediate-mass quiescent and star-forming centrals, $10.48<\log(M/M_\odot)<10.78$. Comparing to the Guo2011 semi-analytic model, the excess number of satellites indicates that quiescent centrals have halo masses 0.3 dex larger than star-forming centrals, even when the stellar-mass distributions are fixed. We use a simple toy model that relates halo mass and quenching, which roughly reproduces the observed quenched fractions and the differences in halo mass between star-forming and quenched galaxies only if galaxies have a quenching probability that increases with halo mass from $\sim$0 for $\log(M_h/M_\odot)\sim$11 to $\sim$1 for $\log(M_h/M_\odot)\sim$13.5. A single halo-mass quenching threshold is unable to reproduce the quiescent fraction and satellite distribution of centrals. Therefore, while halo quenching may be an important mechanism, it is unlikely to be the only factor driving quenching. It remains unclear why a high fraction of centrals remain star-forming even in relatively massive halos.
  • Our understanding of the redshift $z>3$ galaxy population relies largely on samples selected using the popular "dropout" technique, typically consisting of UV-bright galaxies with blue colors and prominent Lyman breaks. As it is currently unknown if these galaxies are representative of the massive galaxy population, we here use the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) Survey to create a stellar mass-limited sample at $z=3-4$. Uniquely, ZFOURGE uses deep near-infrared medium-bandwidth filters to derive accurate photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. The mass-complete sample consists of 57 galaxies with log M $>10.6$, reaching below $M^{\star}$ at $z=3-4$. On average, the massive $z=3-4$ galaxies are extremely faint in the observed optical with median $R_{tot}^{AB}=27.48\pm0.41$ (restframe $M_{1700}=-18.05\pm0.37$). They lie far below the UV luminosity-stellar mass relation for Lyman break galaxies and are about $\sim100\times$ fainter at the same mass. The massive galaxies are red ($R-Ks_{AB}=3.9\pm0.2$; restframe UV-slope $\beta=-0.2\pm0.3$) likely from dust or old stellar ages. We classify the galaxy SEDs by their restframe $U-V$ and $V-J$ colors and find a diverse population: $46^{+6+10}_{-6-17}$% of the massive galaxies are quiescent, $54^{+8+17}_{-8-10}$% are dusty star-forming galaxies, and only $14^{+3+10}_{-3-4}$% resemble luminous blue star forming Lyman break galaxies. This study clearly demonstrates an inherent diversity among massive galaxies at higher redshift than previously known. Furthermore,we uncover a reservoir of dusty star-forming galaxies with $4\times$ lower specific star-formation rates compared to submillimeter-selected starbursts at $z>3$. With $5\times$ higher numbers, the dusty galaxies may represent a more typical mode of star formation compared to submillimeter-bright starbursts.
  • Using observations from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE), we obtain the deepest measurements to date of the galaxy stellar mass function at 0.5 < z < 2.5. ZFOURGE provides well-constrained photometric redshifts made possible through deep medium-bandwidth imaging at 1-2um . We combine this with HST imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), allowing for the efficient selection of both blue and red galaxies down to stellar masses ~10^9.5 Msol at z ~ 2.5. The total surveyed area is 316 arcmin^2 distributed over three independent fields. We supplement these data with the wider and shallower NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS) to provide stronger constraints at high masses. Several studies at z<=1 have revealed a steepening of the slope at the low-mass end of the stellar mass function (SMF), leading to an upturn at masses <10^10 Msol that is not well-described by a standard single-Schechter function. We find evidence that this feature extends to at least z ~ 2, and that it can be found in both the star-forming and quiescent populations individually. The characteristic mass (M*) and slope at the lowest masses (alpha) of a double-Schechter function fit to the SMF stay roughly constant at Log(M/Msol) ~ 10.65 and ~-1.5 respectively. The SMF of star-forming galaxies has evolved primarily in normalization, while the change in shape is relatively minor. This is not the case for quiescent galaxies: the depth of our imaging allows us to show for the first time significantly more evolution at Log(M/Msol) < 10.5 than at higher masses. We find that the total mass density (down to 10^9 Msol) in star-forming galaxies has increased by a factor of ~2.2 since z ~ 2.5, whereas in quiescent galaxies it has increased by a factor of ~12 .
  • We conduct a deep mid-infrared census of nine massive galaxy clusters at (0<z<1.3) with a total of ~1500 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies using Spitzer/IRAC photometry and established mid-infrared color selection techniques. Of the 949 cluster galaxies that are detected in at least three of the four IRAC channels at the >3 sigma level, we identify 12 that host mid-infrared selected active galactic nuclei (IR-AGN). To compare the IR-AGN across our redshift range, we define two complete samples of cluster galaxies: (1) optically-selected members with rest-frame V(AB) magnitude <-21.5 and (2) mid-IR selected members brighter than (M*+0.5), i.e. essentially a stellar mass cut. In both samples, we measure \agnfrac ~1% with a strong upper limit of ~3% at z<1. This uniformly low IR-AGN fraction at z<1 is surprising given the fraction of 24 micron sources in the same galaxy clusters is observed to increase by about a factor of four from z~0 to z~1; this indicates that most of the detected 24 micron flux is due to star formation. Only in our single galaxy cluster at z=1.24 is the IR-AGN fraction measurably higher at ~15% (all members; ~70% for late-types only). In agreement with recent studies, we find the cluster IR-AGN are predominantly hosted by late-type galaxies with blue optical colors, i.e. members with recent/ongoing star formation. The four brightest IR-AGN are also X-ray sources; these IR+X-ray AGN all lie outside the cluster core (Rproj>0.5 Mpc) and are hosted by highly morphologically disturbed members. Although our sample is limited, our results suggest that \agnfrac in massive galaxy clusters is not strongly correlated with star formation at z<1, and that IR-AGN have a more prominent role at z>1.