• Using cosmological N-body simulations, we study the abundance of local maxima (peaks) and minima (dips) identified in the smoothed distribution of halos and dark matter (DM) on scales of $10-100$s Mpcs. The simulations include Gaussian and local-type $f_{\rm NL}$ non-Gaussian initial conditions. The expression derived in the literature for the abundance (irrespective of height) of peaks for Gaussian fields is surprisingly accurate for the evolved halo and DM density fields for all initial conditions considered. Furthermore, the height distribution is very well fitted by a log-normal on quasi-linear scales. The abundance as a function of scale depends on the cosmological parameters ($H_0$ and background matter densities) through the shape of the power spectrum, but it is insensitive to the clustering amplitude. Further, the abundance in the smoothed halo distribution is substantially different in the non-Gaussian from the Gaussian simulations. The interpretation of this effect is straightforward in terms of the scale dependence of halo bias in non-Gaussian models. The abundance of extrema extracted from three-dimensional large galaxy redshift surveys could be a competitive probe of the cosmological parameters and initial non-Gaussianity. It breaks the degeneracy between $f_{\rm NL}$ and the clustering amplitude, making it complementary to counts of galaxy clusters and peaks in weak-lensing maps.
  • The peculiar velocity of a mass tracer is on average aligned with the dipole modulation of the surrounding mass density field. We present a first measurement of the correlation between radial peculiar velocities of objects in the cosmicflows-3 catalog and the dipole moment of the 2MRS galaxy distribution in concentric spherical shells centered on these objects. Limiting the analysis to cosmicflows-3 objects with distances of $100 \rm Mpc h^{-1}$, the correlation function is detected at a confidence level $> 4\sigma$. The measurement is found consistent with the standard $\Lambda$CDM model at $< 1.7\sigma$ level. We formally derive the constraints $0.32<\Omega^{0.55}\sigma_8<0.48$ ($68\% $ confidence level) or equivalently $0.34<\Omega^{0.55}/b<0.52$, where $b$ is the galaxy bias factor. Deeper and improved peculiar velocity catalogs will substantially reduce the uncertainties, allowing tighter constraints from this type of correlations.
  • We develop the framework for testing Lorentz invariance in the dark matter sector using galactic dynamics. We consider a Lorentz violating (LV) vector field acting on the dark matter component of a satellite galaxy orbiting in a host halo. We introduce a numerical model for the dynamics of satellites in a galactic halo and for a galaxy in a rich cluster to explore observational consequences of such an LV field. The orbital motion of a satellite excites a time dependent LV force which greatly affects its internal dynamics. Our analysis points out key observational signatures which serve as probes of LV forces. These include modifications to the line of sight velocity dispersion, mass profiles and shapes of satellites. With future data and a more detailed modeling these signatures can be exploited to constrain a new region of the parameter space describing the LV in the dark matter sector.
  • Observed galaxy luminosities (derived from redshifts) hold information on the large-scale peculiar velocity field in the form of spatially correlated scatter, which allows for bounds on bulk flows and the growth rate of matter density perturbations using large galaxy redshift surveys. We apply this luminosity approach to galaxies from the recent SDSS Data Release 13. Our goal is twofold. First, we take advantage of the recalibrated photometry to identify possible systematic errors relevant to our previous analysis of earlier data. Second, we seek improved constraints on the bulk flow and the normalized growth rate f$\sigma_{8}$ at z ~ 0.1. Our results confirm the robustness of our method. Bulk flow amplitudes, estimated in two redshift bins with 0.02 < z$_{1}$ < 0.07 < z$_{2}$ < 0.22, are generally smaller than in previous measurements, consistent with both the updated photometry and expectations for the $\Lambda$CDM model. The obtained growth rate, f$\sigma_{8}$ = 0.48 +/- 0.16, is larger than, but still compatible with, its previous estimate, and closer to the reference value of Planck. Rather than precision, the importance of these results is due to the fact that they follow from an independent method that relies on accurate photometry, which is a top requirement for next-generation photometric catalogs.
  • NoAM for "No Action Method" is a framework for reconstructing the past orbits of observed tracers of the large scale mass density field. It seeks exact solutions of the equations of motion (EoM), satisfying initial homogeneity and the final observed particle (tracer) positions. The solutions are found iteratively reaching a specified tolerance defined as the RMS of the distance between reconstructed and observed positions. Starting from a guess for the initial conditions, NoAM advances particles using standard N-body techniques for solving the EoM. Alternatively, the EoM can be replaced by any approximation such as Zel'dovich and second order perturbation theory (2LPT). NoAM is suitable for billions of particles and can easily handle non-regular volumes, redshift space, and other constraints. We implement NoAM to systematically compare Zel'dovich, 2LPT, and N-body dynamics over diverse configurations ranging from idealized high-res periodic simulation box to realistic galaxy mocks. Our findings are (i) Non-linear reconstructions with Zel'dovich, 2LPT, and full dynamics perform better than linear theory only for idealized catalogs in real space. For realistic catalogs, linear theory is the optimal choice for reconstructing velocity fields smoothed on scales > 5 Mpc/h. (ii) all non-linear back-in-time reconstructions tested here, produce comparable enhancement of the baryonic oscillation signal in the correlation function.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • The goodness-of-fit (GoF) of the Cosmicflows-2 (CF2) database of peculiar velocities with the LCDM standard model of cosmology is presented. Standard application of the Chi^2 statistics of the full database, of its 4,838 data points, is hampered by the small scale nonlinear dynamics which is not accounted for by the (linear regime) velocity power spectrum. The bulk velocity constitutes a highly compressed representation of the data which filters out the small scales non-linear modes. Hence the statistics of the bulk flow provides an efficient tool for assessing the GoF of the data given a model. The particular approach introduced here is to use the (spherical top-hat window) bulk velocity extracted from the Wiener filter reconstruction of the 3D velocity field as a linear low pass filtered highly compressed representation of the CF2 data. An ensemble 2250 random linear realizations of the WMAP/LCDM model has been used to calculate the bulk velocity auto-covariance matrix. We find that the CF2 data is consistent with the WMAP/LCDM model to better than the 2 sigma confidence limits. This provides a further validation that the CF2 database is consistent with the standard model of cosmology.
  • We present a realistic modeling of the dipole component of the projected sky distribution of NVSS radio galaxies. The modeling relies on mock catalogs generated within the context of $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, in the linear regime of structure formation. After removing the contribution from the solar motion, the mocks show that the remaining observed signal is mostly (70\%) due to structures within $z\lesssim0.1$. The amplitude of the model signal depends on the bias factor $b$ of the NVSS mock galaxies. For sources with flux density, $ S> 15 \; \rm mJy$, the bias recipe inferred from higher order moments is consistent with the observed dipole signal at $2.12\sigma$. Flux thresholds above $20 \; \rm mJy$ yield a disagreement close to the $3\sigma $ level. A constant high bias, $b=3$ is needed to mitigate the tension to the $\sim 2.3\sigma$ level.
  • An interesting test of Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) relies on the observed lag in arrival times of photons emitted from extragalactic transient sources. Attributing the lag between photons of different energies to the gravitational potential of the Milky Way (MW), several authors derive new constraints on deviations from EEP. It is shown here that potential fluctuations from the large scale structure are at least two orders of magnitude larger than the gravitational potential of the MW. Combined with the larger distances, for sources at redshift $z\gtsim 0.5$ the {\it rms} of the contribution from these fluctuations exceeds the MW by more than 4 orders of magnitude. We provide actual constraints for several objects based on a statistical calculation of the large scale fluctuations in the standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model.
  • We explore similarities and differences between several estimators of the cosmological bulk flow, $\bf B$, from the observed radial peculiar velocities of galaxies. A distinction is made between two theoretical definitions of $\bf B$ as a dipole moment of the velocity field weighted by a radial window function. One definition involves the three dimensional (3D) peculiar velocity, while the other is based on its radial component alone. Different methods attempt at inferring $\bf B$ for either of these definitions which coincide only for a constant velocity field. We focus on the Wiener Filtering (WF, Hoffman et al. 2015) and the Constrained Minimum Variance (CMV,Feldman et al. 2010) methodologies. Both methodologies require a prior expressed in terms of the radial velocity correlation function. Hoffman et al. compute $\bf B$ in Top-Hat windows from a WF realization of the 3D peculiar velocity field. Feldman et al. infer $\bf B$ directly from the observed velocities for the second definition of $\bf B$. The WF methodology could easily be adapted to the second definition, in which case it will be equivalent to the CMV with the exception of the imposed constraint. For a prior with vanishing correlations or very noisy data, CMV reproduces the standard Maximum Likelihood (ML, Kaiser 1988) estimation for $\bf B$ of the entire sample independent of the radial weighting function. Therefore, this estimator is likely more susceptible to observational biases that could be present in measurements of distant galaxies. Finally, two additional estimators are proposed.
  • Spatial variations in the distribution of galaxy luminosities, estimated from redshifts as distance proxies, are correlated with the peculiar velocity field. Comparing these variations with the peculiar velocities inferred from galaxy redshift surveys is a powerful test of gravity and dark energy theories on cosmological scales. Using ~ 2 $\times$ 10$^{5}$ galaxies from the SDSS Data Release 7, we perform this test in the framework of gravitational instability to estimate the normalized growth rate of density perturbations f$\sigma_{8}$ = 0.37 +/- 0.13 at z ~ 0.1, which is in agreement with the $\Lambda$CDM scenario. This unique measurement is complementary to those obtained with more traditional methods, including clustering analysis. The estimated accuracy at z ~ 0.1 is competitive with other methods when applied to similar datasets.
  • We study the angular clustering of $\sim 6\times 10^5$ NVSS sources on scales $\gtrsim 50 h^{-1}$ Mpc in the context of the $\Lambda$CDM scenario. The analysis partially relies on the redshift distribution of 131 radio galaxies, inferred from the Hercules and CENSORS survey, and an empirical fit to the stellar to halo mass (SHM) relation. For redshifts $z\lesssim 0.7$, the fraction of radio activity versus stellar mass evolves as $f_{_{\rm RL}}\sim M_*^{\alpha_0+\alpha_1 z}$ where $\alpha_0=2.529{\pm0.184}$ and $\alpha_1=1.854^{+0.708}_{-0.761}$. The estimate on $\alpha_0$ is largely driven by the results of Best et al. (2005), while the constraint on $\alpha_1$ is new. We derive a biasing factor $b(z=0.5)=2.093^{+0.164}_{-0.109}$ between radio galaxies and the underlying mass.The function $b(z)=0.33z^2+0.85 z +1.6$ fits well the redshift dependence. We also provide convenient parametric forms for the redshift dependent radio luminosity function, which are consistent with the redshift distribution and the NVSS source count versus flux.
  • Comparison of galaxy flows with those predicted from the local galaxy distribution ended as an active field after two analyses came to vastly different conclusions 25 years ago, but that was due to faulty data. All the old results are therefore suspect. With new data collected in the last several years, the problem deserves another look. For this we analyze the gravity field inferred from the enormous data set derived from the 2MASS collection of galaxies, and compare it to the velocity field derived from the well calibrated SFI++ Tully-Fisher catalog. Using the "Inverse Method" to minimize Malmquist biases, within 10,000 km/s the gravity field is seen to predict the velocity field to remarkable consistency. This is a beautiful demonstration of linear perturbation theory and is fully consistent with standard values of the cosmological variables.
  • The phase space distribution of matter out to $\sim 100 \rm Mpc$ is probed by two types of observational data: galaxy redshift surveys and peculiar motions of galaxies. Important information on the process of structure formation and deviations from standard gravity have been extracted from the accumulating data. The remarkably simple Zel'dovich approximation is the basis for much of our insight into the dynamics of structure formation and the development of data analyses methods. Progress in the methodology and some recent results is reviewed.
  • Peculiar motion introduces systematic variations in the observed luminosity distribution of galaxies. This allows one to constrain the cosmic peculiar velocity field from large galaxy redshift surveys. Using around half a million galaxies from the SDSS Data Release 7 at z ~ 0.1, we demonstrate the applicability of this approach to large datasets and obtain bounds on peculiar velocity moments and $\sigma_{8}$, the amplitude of the linear matter power spectrum. Our results are in good agreement with the $\Lambda$CDM model and consistent with the previously reported ~ 1% zero-point tilt in the SDSS photometry. Finally, we discuss the prospects of constraining the growth rate of density perturbations by reconstructing the full linear velocity field from the observed galaxy clustering in redshift space.
  • Spatial modulations in the distribution of observed luminosities (computed using redshifts) of ~ 5 $\times$ 10$^5$ galaxies from the SDSS Data Release 7, probe the cosmic peculiar velocity field out to z ~ 0.1. Allowing for luminosity evolution, the r-band luminosity function, determined via a spline-based estimator, is well represented by a Schechter form with M$^{\star}$(z) - 5log$_{10}$h = -20.52 - 1.6(z - 0.1) $\pm$ 0.05 and $\alpha^{\star}$ = -1.1 $\pm$ 0.03. Bulk flows and higher velocity moments in two redshift bins, 0.02 < z < 0.07 and 0.07 < z < 0.22, agree with the predictions of the $\Lambda$CDM model, as obtained from mock galaxy catalogs designed to match the observations. Assuming a $\Lambda$CDM model, we estimate $\sigma_{8}$ $\approx$ 1.1 $\pm$ 0.4 for the amplitude of the linear matter power spectrum, where the low accuracy is due to the limited number of galaxies. While the low-z bin is robust against coherent photometric uncertainties, the bias of results from the second bin is consistent with the ~ 1% magnitude tilt reported by the SDSS collaboration. The systematics are expected to have a significantly lower impact in future datasets with larger sky coverage and better photometric calibration.
  • Maximum Likelihood estimation of the bulk flow from radial peculiar motions of galaxies, generally assumes a constant velocity field inside the survey volume. The assumption is inconsistent with the definition of the bulk flow as the average of the peculiar velocity field over the relevant volume. This follows from a straightforward mathematical relation between the bulk flow of a sphere and the velocity potential on its surface. The inconsistency exists also for ideal data with exact radial velocities and full spatial coverage. Based on the same relation we propose a simple modification to correct for this inconsistency.
  • There is a $\sim 150 km s^{-1}$ discrepancy between the measured motion of the Local Group of galaxies (LG) with respect to the CMB and the linear theory prediction based on the gravitational force field of the large scale structure in full-sky redshift surveys. We perform a variety of tests which show that the LG motion cannot be recovered to better than $150-200 km s^{-1}$ in amplitude and within a $\approx10^\circ$ in direction. The tests rely on catalogs of mock galaxies identified in the Millennium simulation using semi-analytic galaxy formation models. We compare these results to the $K_s=11.75$ Two-Mass Galaxy Redshift Survey, which provides the deepest, widest and most complete spatial distribution of galaxies available so far. In our analysis we use a new, concise relation for deriving the LG motion and bulk flow from the true distribution of galaxies in redshift space. Our results show that the main source of uncertainty is the small effective depth of surveys like the 2MRS that prevents a proper sampling of the large scale structure beyond $\sim100 h^{-1} Mpc$. Deeper redshift surveys are needed to reach the "convergence scale" of $\approx 250 h^{-1}Mpc $ in a $\Lambda$CDM universe. Deeper survey would also mitigate the impact of the "Kaiser rocket" which, in a survey like 2MRS, remains a significant source of uncertainty. Thanks to the quiet and moderate density environment of the LG, purely dynamical uncertainties of the linear predictions are subdominant at the level of $\sim 90 km s^{-1}$. Finally, we show that deviations from linear galaxy biasing and shot noise errors provide a minor contribution to the total error budget.
  • The observed density field in redshift space is directly affected by the radial motions generated from mass fluctuations outside the volume occupied by a given galaxy redshift survey. These motions introduce redshift space anisotropies which are more pronounced at larger distances from the survey's center, thus offering clues to the nature of mass fluctuations on super-survey scales. Furthermore, we note that all estimates of the growth factor derived from redshift space distortions are based on relations which explicitly assume that the velocity field is generated by mass fluctuations inside the survey volume. This may cause uncertainties in these estimates which are on the order of a few percent.
  • We constrain the most likely range of masses for the Milky Way and M31 using an application of the Numerical Action Method (NAM) that optimizes the fit to observed parameters over a large ensemble of NAM-generated solutions. Our 95% confidence level mass ranges, 1.5-4.5 x 10^12 m_sun for MW and 1.5-5.5 x 10^12 m_sun for M31, are consistent with the upper range of estimates from other methods and suggests that a larger proportion of the total mass becomes detectable when the peculiar motions of many nearby satellites are taken into account in the dynamical analysis. We test the method against simulated Local Group catalogs extracted from the Millennium Run to confirm that mass predictions are consistent with actual galaxy halo masses.
  • The cosmological peculiar velocity field (deviations from the pure Hubble flow) of matter carries significant information on dark energy, dark matter and the underlying theory of gravity on large scales. Peculiar motions of galaxies introduce systematic deviations between the observed galaxy redshifts z and the corresponding cosmological redshifts z_cos. A novel method for estimating the angular power spectrum of the peculiar velocity field based on observations of galaxy redshifts and apparent magnitudes m (or equivalently fluxes) is presented. This method exploits the fact that a mean relation between z_cos and m of galaxies can be derived from all galaxies in a redshift-magnitude survey. Given a galaxy magnitude, it is shown that the z_cos(m) relation yields its cosmological redshift with a 1-sigma error of sigma_z~0.3 for a survey like Euclid (~10^9 galaxies at z<~2), and can be used to constrain the angular power spectrum of z-z_cos(m) with a high signal-to-noise ratio. At large angular separations corresponding to l<~15, we obtain significant constraints on the power spectrum of the peculiar velocity field. At 15<~l<~60, magnitude shifts in the z_cos(m) relation caused by gravitational lensing magnification dominate, allowing us to probe the line-of-sight integral of the gravitational potential. Effects related to the environmental dependence in the luminosity function can easily be computed and their contamination removed from the estimated power spectra. The amplitude of the combined velocity and lensing power spectra at z~1 can be measured with <~5% accuracy.
  • Using redshifts as a proxy for galaxy distances, estimates of the 2D transverse peculiar velocities of distant galaxies could be obtained from future measurements of proper motions. We provide the mathematical framework for analyzing 2D transverse motions and show that they offer several advantages over traditional probes of large scale motions. They are completely independent of any intrinsic relations between galaxy properties, hence they are essentially free of selection biases. They are free from homogeneous and inhomogeneous Malmquist biases that typically plague distance indicator catalogs. They provide additional information to traditional probes which yield line-of-sight peculiar velocities only. Further, because of their 2D nature, fundamental questions regarding vorticity of large scale flows can be addressed. Gaia for example is expected to provide proper motions of at least bright galaxies with high central surface brightness, making proper motions a likely contender traditional probes based on current and future distance indicator measurements.
  • It is widely accepted that within the framework of LCDM a significant fraction of giant-disk galaxies has recently experienced a violent galactic merger. We present numerical simulations of such major mergers of gas-rich pure disk galaxies, and focus on the innermost stellar component (bulge) of the disk remnants. The simulations have high spatial and mass resolutions, and resolve regions deep enough to allow bulge classification according to standard kinematical and structural characteristics. In agreement with recent studies we find that these bulges are dominated by stars formed in the final coalescence process. In contrast to the common interpretation of such components as classical bulges (i.e. similar to intermediate luminosity ellipticals), we find they are supported by highly coherent rotations and have Sersic indices n<2, a result leading to their classification as pseudo-bulges. Pseudo-bulge formation by gas rich major mergers of pure disks is a novel mode of pseudo-bulge formation; It complements pseudo-bulge growth by secular evolution, and it could help explain the high fractions of classically bulge-less giant disk galaxies, and pseudo-bulges found in giant Sc galaxies.
  • Using the nearly full sky Ks=11.75 2MASS Redshift Survey [2MRS]of ~45,000 galaxies we reconstruct the underlying peculiar velocity field and constrain the cosmological bulk flow within ~100. These results are obtained by maximizing the probability to estimate the absolute magnitude of a galaxy given its observed apparent magnitude and redshift. At a depth of ~60 Mpc/h we find a bulk flow Vb=(90\pm65,-230\pm65,50\pm65) km/s in agreement with the theoretical predictions of the LCDM model. The reconstructed peculiar velocity field that maximizes the likelihood is characterized by the parameter beta=0.323 +/- 0.08. Both results are in agreement with those obtained previously using the ~23,000 galaxies of the shallower Ks=11.25 2MRS survey. In our analysis we find that the luminosity function of 2MRS galaxies is poorly fitted by the Schechter form and that luminosity evolves such that objects become fainter with increasing redshift according to L(z)=L(z=0)(1+z)^(+2.7 +/-0.15).
  • Given a redshift survey of galaxies with measurements of apparent magnitudes, we present a novel method for measuring the growth rate $f(\Omega)$ of cosmological linear perturbations. We use the galaxy distribution within the survey to solve for the peculiar velocity field which depends in linear perturbation theory on $\beta=f(\Omega)/b$, where $b$ is the bias factor of the galaxy distribution. The recovered line-of-sight peculiar velocities are subtracted from the redshifts to derive the distances, which thus allows an estimate of the absolute magnitude of each galaxy. A constraint on $\beta$ is then found by minimizing the spread of the estimated magnitudes from their distribution function. We apply the method to the all sky $K = 11.25$ Two-MASS Redhsift Survey (2MRS) and derive $\beta=0.35\pm 0.1$ at $z\sim 0$, remarkably consistent with our previous estimate from the velocity-velocity comparison. The method could easily be applied to subvolumes extracted from the SDSS survey to derive the growth rate at $z \sim 0.1$. Further, it should also be applicable to ongoing and future spectroscopic redshift surveys to trace the evolution of $f(\Omega)$ to $z\sim1$. Constraints obtained from this method are entirely independent from those obtained from the two-dimensional distortion of $\xi(s)$ and provide an important check on $f(\Omega)$, as alternative gravity models predict observable differences.