• A network community-based reduced-order model is developed to capture key interactions amongst coherent structures in high-dimensional unsteady vortical flows. The present approach is data-inspired and founded on network-theoretic techniques to identify important vortical communities that are comprised of vortical elements that share similar dynamical behavior. The overall interaction-based physics of the high-dimensional flow field is distilled into the vortical community centroids, considerably reducing the system dimension. Taking advantage of these vortical interactions, the proposed methodology is applied to formulate reduced-order models for the inter-community dynamics of vortical flows, and predict lift and drag forces on bodies in wake flows. We demonstrate the capabilities of these models by accurately capturing the macroscopic dynamics of a collection of discrete point vortices, and the complex unsteady aerodynamic forces on a circular cylinder and an airfoil with a Gurney flap. The present formulation is found to be robust against simulated experimental noise and turbulence due to its integrating nature of the system reduction.
  • A networked oscillator based analysis is performed for periodic bluff body flows to examine and control the transfer of kinetic energy. Spatial modes extracted from the flow field with corresponding amplitudes form a set of oscillators describing unsteady fluctuations. These oscillators are connected through a network that captures the energy exchanges amongst them. To extract the network of interactions among oscillators, amplitude and phase perturbations are impulsively introduced to the oscillators and the ensuing dynamics are analyzed. Using linear regression techniques, a networked oscillator model is constructed that reveals energy transfers and phase interactions among the modes. The model captures the nonlinear interactions amongst the modal oscillators through a linear approximation. A large collection of system responses are aggregated into a network model that captures interactions for general perturbations. The networked oscillator model describes the modal perturbation dynamics better than the empirical Galerkin reduced-order models. A model-based feedback controller is then designed to suppress modal amplitudes and the resulting wake unsteadiness leading to drag reduction. The strength of the proposed approach is demonstrated for a canonical example of two- dimensional unsteady flow over a circular cylinder. The present formulation enables the characterization of modal interactions to control fundamental energy transfers in unsteady vortical flows.
  • We examine discrete vortex dynamics in two-dimensional flow through a network-theoretic approach. The interaction of the vortices is represented with a graph, which allows the use of network-theoretic approaches to identify key vortex-to-vortex interactions. We employ sparsification techniques on these graph representations based on spectral theory for constructing sparsified models and evaluating the dynamics of vortices in the sparsified setup. Identification of vortex structures based on graph sparsification and sparse vortex dynamics are illustrated through an example of point-vortex clusters interacting amongst themselves. We also evaluate the performance of sparsification with increasing number of point vortices. The sparsified-dynamics model developed with spectral graph theory requires reduced number of vortex-to-vortex interactions but agrees well with the full nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, the sparsified model derived from the sparse graphs conserves the invariants of discrete vortex dynamics. We highlight the similarities and differences between the present sparsified-dynamics model and the reduced-order models.
  • The present paper reports on our effort to characterize vortical interactions in complex fluid flows through the use of network analysis. In particular, we examine the vortex interactions in two-dimensional decaying isotropic turbulence and find that the vortical interaction network can be characterized by a weighted scale-free network. It is found that the turbulent flow network retains its scale-free behavior until the characteristic value of circulation reaches a critical value. Furthermore, we show that the two-dimensional turbulence network is resilient against random perturbations but can be greatly influenced when forcing is focused towards the vortical structures that are categorized as network hubs. These findings can serve as a network-analytic foundation to examine complex geophysical and thin-film flows and take advantage of the rapidly growing field of network theory, which complements ongoing turbulence research based on vortex dynamics, hydrodynamic stability, and statistics. While additional work is essential to extend the mathematical tools from network analysis to extract deeper physical insights of turbulence, an understanding of turbulence based on the interaction-based network-theoretic framework presents a promising alternative in turbulence modeling and control efforts.