• Strongly gravitational lensed quasars can be used to measure the so-called time-delay distance $D_{\Delta t}$, and thus the Hubble constant $H_0$ and other cosmological parameters. Stellar kinematics of the deflector galaxy play an essential role in this measurement by: (i) helping break the mass-sheet degeneracy; (ii) determining in principle the angular diameter distance $D_{\rm d}$ to the deflector and thus further improving the cosmological constraints. In this paper we simulate observations of lensed quasars with integral field spectrographs and show that spatially resolved kinematics of the deflector enable further progress by helping break the mass-anisotropy degeneracy. Furthermore, we use our simulations to obtain realistic error estimates with current/upcoming instruments like OSIRIS on Keck and NIRSPEC on the James Webb Space Telescope for both distances (typically $\sim6$ per cent on $D_{\Delta t}$ and $\sim10$ per cent on $D_{\rm d}$). We use the error estimates to compute cosmological forecasts for the sample of nine lenses that currently have well measured time delays and deep Hubble Space Telescope images and for a sample of 40 lenses that is projected to be available in a few years through follow-up of candidates found in ongoing wide field surveys. We find that $H_0$ can be measured with 2 per cent (1 per cent) precision from nine (40) lenses in a flat $\Lambda$cold dark matter cosmology. We study several other cosmological models beyond the flat $\Lambda$cold dark matter model and find that time-delay lenses with spatially resolved kinematics can greatly improve the precision of the cosmological parameters measured by cosmic microwave background data.
  • The virial masses of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) have been estimated using the kinematics and abundance of their globular cluster populations, leading to disparate results. Some studies conclude that UDGs reside in massive dark matter halos while others, controversially, argue for the existence of UDGs with no dark matter at all. Here we show that these results arise because the uncertainties of these mass estimates have been substantially underestimated. Indeed, applying the same procedure to the well-studied Fornax dwarf spheroidal would conclude that it has an "overmassive" dark halo or, alternatively, that it lacks dark matter. We corroborate our argument with self- consistent mocks of tracers in cosmological halos, showing that masses from samples with $5 < N < 10$ tracers (assuming no measurement errors) are uncertain by at least an order of magnitude. Finally, we estimate masses of UDGs with HST imaging in Coma and show that their recent mass measurements (with adequate uncertainties) are in agreement with that of other dwarfs, such as Fornax.. We also provide bias and scatter factors for a range of sample sizes and measurement errors, of wider applicability.
  • Strongly lensed active galactic nuclei (AGN) provide a unique opportunity to make progress in the study of the evolution of the correlation between the mass of supermassive black holes ($\mathcal M_{BH}$) and their host galaxy luminosity ($L_{host}$). We demonstrate the power of lensing by analyzing two systems for which state-of-the-art lens modelling techniques have been applied to Hubble Space Telescope imaging data. We use i) the reconstructed images to infer the total and bulge luminosity of the host and ii) published broad-line spectroscopy to estimate $\mathcal M_{BH}$ using the so-called virial method. We then enlarge our sample with new calibration of previously published measurements to study the evolution of the correlation out to z~4.5. Consistent with previous work, we find that without taking into account passive luminosity evolution, the data points lie on the local relation. Once passive luminosity evolution is taken into account, we find that BHs in the more distant Universe reside in less luminous galaxies than today. Fitting this offset as $\mathcal M_{BH}$/$L_{host}$ $\propto$ (1+z)$^{\gamma}$, and taking into account selection effects, we obtain $\gamma$ = 0.6 $\pm$ 0.1 and 0.8$\pm$ 0.1 for the case of $\mathcal M_{BH}$-$L_{bulge}$ and $\mathcal M_{BH}$-$L_{total}$, respectively. To test for systematic uncertainties and selection effects we also consider a reduced sample that is homogeneous in data quality. We find consistent results but with considerably larger uncertainty due to the more limited sample size and redshift coverage ($\gamma$ = 0.7 $\pm$ 0.4 and 0.2$\pm$ 0.5 for $\mathcal M_{BH}$-$L_{bulge}$ and $\mathcal M_{BH}$-$L_{total}$, respectively), highlighting the need to gather more high-quality data for high-redshift lensed quasar hosts. Our result is consistent with a scenario where the growth of the black hole predates that of the host galaxy.
  • We present the discovery of 3 quasar lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), selected using two novel photometry-based selection techniques. The J0941+0518 system, with two point sources separated by 5.46" on either side of a galaxy, has source and lens redshifts $z_s = 1.54$ and $z_l = 0.343$. The AO-assisted images of J2211+1929 show two point sources separated by 1.04", corresponding to the same quasar at $z_s = 1.07,$ besides the lens galaxy and Einstein ring. Images of J2257+2349 show two point sources separated by 1.67" on either side of an E/S0 galaxy. The extracted spectra show two images of the same quasar at redshift $z_s = 2.10$. In total, the two selection techniques identified 309 lens candidates, including 47 known lenses, and 6 previously ruled out candidates. 55 of the remaining candidates were observed using NIRC2 and ESI at Keck Observatory, EFOSC2 at the ESO-NTT (La Silla), and SAM and the Goodman spectrograph at SOAR. Of the candidates observed, 3 were confirmed as lenses, 36 were ruled out, and 16 remain inconclusive. Taking into account that we recovered known lenses, this gives us a success rate of at least 50/309 (16%). This initial campaign demonstrates the power of purely photometric selection techniques in finding lensed quasars. Developing and refining these techniques is essential for efficient identification of these rare lenses in ongoing and future photometric surveys.
  • I describe two novel techniques originally devised to select strongly lensed quasar candidates in wide-field surveys. The first relies on outlier selection in optical and mid-infrared magnitude space; the second combines mid-infrared colour selection with GAIA spatial resolution, to identify multiplets of objects with quasar-like colours. Both methods have already been applied successfully to the SDSS, ATLAS and DES footprints: besides recovering known lenses from previous searches, they have led to new discoveries, including quadruply lensed quasars, which are rare within the rare-object class of quasar lenses. As a serendipitous by-product, at least four candidate Galactic streams in the South have been identified among foreground contaminants. There is considerable scope for tailoring the WISE-GAIA multiplet search to stellar-like objects, instead of quasar-like, and to automatically detect Galactic streams.
  • We report the discovery of the quadruply lensed quasar J1433+6007, mined in the SDSS DR12 photometric catalogues using a novel outlier-selection technique, without prior spectroscopic or UV excess information. Discovery data obtained at the Nordic Optical telescope (NOT, La Palma) show nearly identical quasar spectra at $z_s=2.74$ and four quasar images in a fold configuration, one of which sits on a blue arc. The deflector redshift is $z_{l}=0.407,$ from Keck-ESI spectra. We describe the selection procedure, discovery and follow-up, image positions and $BVRi$ magnitudes, and first results and forecasts from simple lens models.
  • We present gravitational lens models of the multiply imaged quasar DES J0408-5354, recently discovered in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint, with the aim of interpreting its remarkable quad-like configuration. We first model the DES single-epoch $grizY$ images as a superposition of a lens galaxy and four point-like objects, obtaining spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and relative positions for the objects. Three of the point sources (A,B,D) have SEDs compatible with the discovery quasar spectra, while the faintest point-like image (G2/C) shows significant reddening and a `grey' dimming of $\approx0.8$mag. In order to understand the lens configuration, we fit different models to the relative positions of A,B,D. Models with just a single deflector predict a fourth image at the location of G2/C but considerably brighter and bluer. The addition of a small satellite galaxy ($R_{\rm E}\approx0.2$") in the lens plane near the position of G2/C suppresses the flux of the fourth image and can explain both the reddening and grey dimming. All models predict a main deflector with Einstein radius between $1.7"$ and $2.0",$ velocity dispersion $267-280$km/s and enclosed mass $\approx 6\times10^{11}M_{\odot},$ even though higher resolution imaging data are needed to break residual degeneracies in model parameters. The longest time-delay (B-A) is estimated as $\approx 85$ (resp. $\approx125$) days by models with (resp. without) a perturber near G2/C. The configuration and predicted time-delays of J0408-5354 make it an excellent target for follow-up aimed at understanding the source quasar host galaxy and substructure in the lens, and measuring cosmological parameters. We also discuss some lessons learnt from J0408-5354 on lensed quasar finding strategies, due to its chromaticity and morphology.
  • Wide-field photometric surveys enable searches of rare yet interesting objects, such as strongly lensed quasars or quasars with a bright host galaxy. Past searches for lensed quasars based on their optical and near infrared properties have relied on photometric cuts and spectroscopic pre-selection (as in the Sloan Quasar Lens Search), or neural networks applied to photometric samples. These methods rely on cuts in morphology and colours, with the risk of losing many interesting objects due to scatter in their population properties, restrictive training sets, systematic uncertainties in catalog-based magnitudes, and survey-to-survey photometric variations. Here, we explore the performance of a Gaussian Mixture Model to separate point-like quasars, quasars with an extended host, and strongly lensed quasars using griz psf and model magnitudes and WISE W1, W2. The choice of optical magnitudes is due to their presence in all current and upcoming releases of wide-field surveys, whereas UV information is not always available. We then assess the contamination from blue galaxies and the role of additional features such as W3 magnitudes or psf-model terms as morphological information. As a demonstration, we conduct a search in a random 10% of the SDSS footprint, and we provide the catalog of the 43 SDSS object with the highest `lens' score in our selection that survive visual inspection, and are spectroscopically confirmed to host active nuclei. We inspect archival data and find images of 5/43 objects in the Hubble Legacy Archive, including 2 known lenses. The code and materials are available to facilitate follow-up.
  • The empirical correlation between the mass of a super-massive black hole (MBH) and its host galaxy properties is widely considered to be evidence of their co-evolution. A powerful way to test the co-evolution scenario and learn about the feedback processes linking galaxies and nuclear activity is to measure these correlations as a function of redshift. Unfortunately, currently MBH can only be estimated in active galaxies at cosmological distances. At these distances, bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) can outshine the host galaxy, making it extremely difficult to measure the host's luminosity. Strongly lensed AGNs provide in principle a great opportunity to improve the sensitivity and accuracy of the host galaxy luminosity measurements as the host galaxy is magnified and more easily separated from the point source, provided the lens model is sufficiently accurate. In order to measure the MBH-L correlation with strong lensing, it is necessary to ensure that the lens modelling is accurate, and that the host galaxy luminosity can be recovered to at least a precision and accuracy better than that of the typical MBH measurement. We carry out extensive and realistic simulations of deep Hubble Space Telescope observations of lensed AGNs obtained by our collaboration. We show that the host galaxy luminosity can be recovered with better accuracy and precision than the typical uncertainty on MBH(~ 0.5 dex) for hosts as faint as 2-4 magnitudes dimmer than the AGN itself. Our simulations will be used to estimate bias and uncertainties on the actual measurements to be presented in a future paper.
  • The arrival times, positions, and fluxes of multiple images in strong lens systems can be used to infer the presence of dark subhalos in the deflector, and thus test predictions of cold dark matter models. However, gravitational lensing does not distinguish between perturbations to a smooth gravitational potential arising from baryonic and non-baryonic mass. In this work, we quantify the extent to which the stellar mass distribution of a deflector can reproduce flux ratio and astrometric anomalies typically associated with the presence of a dark matter subhalo. Using Hubble Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies, we simulate strong lens systems with real distributions of stellar mass as they would be observed at redshift $z_d=0.5$. We add a dark matter halo and external shear to account for the smooth dark matter field, omitting dark substructure, and use a Monte Carlo procedure to characterize the distributions of image positions, time delays, and flux ratios for a compact background source of diameter 5 pc. By convolving high-resolution images of real galaxies with a Gaussian PSF, we simulate the most detailed smooth potential one could construct given high quality data, and find scatter in flux ratios of $\approx 10\%$, which we interpret as a typical deviation from a smooth potential caused by large and small scale structure in the lensing galaxy. We demonstrate that the flux ratio anomalies arising from galaxy-scale baryonic structure can be minimized by selecting the most massive and round deflectors, and by simultaneously modeling flux ratio and astrometric data.
  • Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as "Einstein Rings" in high resolution images. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope $\gamma'$ of the total mass density profile $\rho_{tot}\propto r^{-\gamma'}$ for the main deflector can be measured. Ideally, we require that the statistical error on $\gamma'$ be less than 0.02, such that it is subdominant to other sources of random and systematic uncertainties. We find that survey data will likely have sufficient depth and resolution to meet the target only for the brighter gravitational lens systems, comparable to those discovered by the SDSS survey. For fainter systems, that will be discovered by current and future surveys, targeted follow-up will be required. However, the exposure time required with upcoming facilitites such as JWST, the Keck Next Generation Adaptive Optics System, and TMT, will only be of order a few minutes per system, thus making the follow-up of hundreds of systems a practical and efficient cosmological probe.
  • We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at $z_{s}=1.64.$ The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is $0.51$". DES J2200+0110 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at $z_{s}=2.38$ and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at $z_{l}=0.799$, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein Radius is $0.68$" corresponding to an enclosed mass of $1.6\times10^{11}\,M_{\odot}.$ Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data-mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES dataset.
  • We present spectroscopy and laser guide star adaptive optics (LGSAO) images of the doubly imaged lensed quasar SDSS J1206+4332. We revise the deflector redshift proposed previously to $z_{d}=0.745,$ and measure for the first time its velocity dispersion $\sigma=(290\pm30)$ km/s. The LGSAO data show the lensed quasar host galaxy stretching over the astroid caustic thus forming an extra pair of merging images, which was previously thought to be an unrelated galaxy in seeing limited data. Owing to the peculiar geometry, the lens acts as a natural coronagraph on the broad-line region of the quasar so that only narrow [O III] emission is found in the fold arc. We use the data to reconstruct the source structure and deflector potential, including nearby perturbers. We reconstruct the point-spread function (PSF) from the quasar images themselves, since no additional point source is present in the field of view. From gravitational lensing and stellar dynamics, we find the slope of the total mass density profile to be $\gamma^{\prime}=-\log\rho/\log r =1.93\pm0.09.$ We discuss the potential of SDSS J1206+4332 for measuring time delay distance (and thus H$_0$ and other cosmological parameters), or as a standard ruler, in combination with the time delay published by the COSMOGRAIL collaboration. We conclude that this system is very promising for cosmography. However, in order to achieve competitive precision and accuracy, an independent characterization of the PSF is needed. Spatially resolved kinematics of the deflector would reduce the uncertainties further. Both are within the reach of current observational facilities.
  • Gravitationally lensed (GL) quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine learning techniques and demonstrate that a two step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step we use catalog-level information ($griz$+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to preselect targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (Gradient-Boosted Trees), to form a final set of candidates. The results from this procedure can be used to further refine the simpler SQLS algorithms, with a twofold (or threefold) gain in purity and the same (or $80\%$) completeness at target-selection stage, or a purity of $70\%$ and a completeness of $60\%$ after the candidate-selection step. Simpler photometric searches in $griz$+WISE based on colour cuts would provide samples with $7\%$ purity or less. Our technique is extremely fast, as a list of candidates can be obtained from a stage III experiment (e.g. DES catalog/database) in {a few} CPU hours. The techniques are easily extendable to Stage IV experiments like LSST with the addition of time domain information.