• National statistical institutes in many countries are now mandated to produce reliable statistics for important variables such as population, income, unemployment, health outcomes, etc. for small areas, defined by geography and/or demography. Due to small samples from these areas, direct sample-based estimates are often unreliable. Model-based small area estimation is now extensively used to generate reliable statistics by "borrowing strength" from other areas and related variables through suitable models. Outliers adversely influence standard model-based small area estimates. To deal with outliers, Sinha and Rao (2009) proposed a robust frequentist approach. In this article, we present a robust Bayesian alternative to the nested error regression model for unit-level data to mitigate outliers. We consider a two-component scale mixture of normal distributions for the unit-level error to model outliers and present a computational approach to produce Bayesian predictors of small area means under a noninformative prior for model parameters. A real example and extensive simulations convincingly show robustness of our Bayesian predictors to outliers. Simulations comparison of these two procedures with Bayesian predictors by Datta and Ghosh (1991) and M-quantile estimators by Chambers et al. (2014) shows that our proposed procedure is better than the others in terms of bias, variability, and coverage probability of prediction intervals, when there are outliers. The superior frequentist performance of our procedure shows its dual (Bayes and frequentist) dominance, and makes it attractive to all practitioners, both Bayesian and frequentist, of small area estimation.
  • This article considers a robust hierarchical Bayesian approach to deal with random effects of small area means when some of these effects assume extreme values, resulting in outliers. In presence of outliers, the standard Fay-Herriot model, used for modeling area-level data, under normality assumptions of the random effects may overestimate random effects variance, thus provides less than ideal shrinkage towards the synthetic regression predictions and inhibits borrowing information. Even a small number of substantive outliers of random effects result in a large estimate of the random effects variance in the Fay-Herriot model, thereby achieving little shrinkage to the synthetic part of the model or little reduction in posterior variance associated with the regular Bayes estimator for any of the small areas. While a scale mixture of normal distributions with known mixing distribution for the random effects has been found to be effective in presence of outliers, the solution depends on the mixing distribution. As a possible alternative solution to the problem, a two-component normal mixture model has been proposed based on noninformative priors on the model variance parameters, regression coefficients and the mixing probability. Data analysis and simulation studies based on real, simulated and synthetic data show advantage of the proposed method over the standard Bayesian Fay-Herriot solution derived under normality of random effects.