• Measurements of the galaxy UV luminosity function at z>6 suggest that young stars hosted in low-mass star-forming galaxies produced the bulk of hydrogen-ionizing photons necessary to reionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) by redshift z~6. Whether star-forming galaxies dominated cosmic reionization, however, also depends on their stellar populations and interstellar medium properties, which set, among other things, the production rate of H-ionizing photons, $\xi_\text{ion}^\star$, and the fraction of these escaping into the IGM. Given the difficulty of constraining with existing observatories the physical properties of z>6 galaxies, in this work we focus on a sample of ten nearby objects showing UV spectral features comparable to those observed at z>6. We use the new-generation Beagle tool to model the UV-to-optical photometry and UV/optical emission lines of these Local 'analogues' of high-redshift galaxies, finding that our relatively simple, yet fully self-consistent, physical model can successfully reproduce the different observables considered. Our galaxies span a broad range of metallicities and are characterised by high ionization parameters, low dust attenuation, and very young stellar populations. Through our analysis, we derive a novel diagnostic of the production rate of H-ionizing photons per unit UV luminosity, $\xi_\text{ion}^\star$, based on the equivalent width of the bright $[\text{OIII}] \lambda 4959,5007$ doublet, which does not require measurements of H-recombination lines. This new diagnostic can be used to estimate $\xi_\text{ion}^\star$ from future direct measurements of the $[\text{OIII}] \lambda 4959,5007$ line using JWST/NIRSpec (out to z~9.5), and by exploiting the contamination by $\text{H}\beta + [\text{OIII}] \lambda 4959,5007$ of photometric observations of distant galaxies, for instance from existing Spitzer/IRAC data and from future ones with JWST/NIRCam.
  • The cosmological origin of carbon, the fourth most abundant element in the Universe, is not well known and matter of heavy debate. We investigate the behavior of C/O to O/H in order to constrain the production mechanism of carbon. We measured emission-line intensities in a spectral range from 1600 to 10000 \AA\ on Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) long-slit spectra of 18 starburst galaxies in the local Universe. We determined chemical abundances through traditional nebular analysis and we used a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to determine where our carbon and oxygen abundances lie in the parameter space. We conclude that our C and O abundance measurements are sensible. We analyzed the behavior of our sample in the [C/O] vs. [O/H] diagram with respect to other objects such as DLAs, neutral ISM measurements, and disk and halo stars, finding that each type of object seems to be located in a specific region of the diagram. Our sample shows a steeper C/O vs. O/H slope with respect to other samples, suggesting that massive stars contribute more to the production of C than N at higher metallicities, only for objects where massive stars are numerous; otherwise intermediate-mass stars dominate the C and N production.
  • Nearby dwarf galaxies provide a unique laboratory in which to test stellar population models below $Z_\odot/2$. Such tests are particularly important for interpreting the surprising high-ionization UV line emission detected at $z>6$ in recent years. We present HST/COS ultraviolet spectra of ten nearby metal-poor star-forming galaxies selected to show He II emission in SDSS optical spectra. The targets span nearly a dex in gas-phase oxygen abundance ($7.8<12+\log\mathrm{O/H}<8.5$) and present uniformly large specific star formation rates (sSFR $\sim 10^2$ $\mathrm{Gyr}^{-1}$). The UV spectra confirm that metal-poor stellar populations can power extreme nebular emission in high-ionization UV lines, reaching C III] equivalent widths comparable to those seen in systems at $z\sim 6-7$. Our data reveal a marked transition in UV spectral properties with decreasing metallicity, with systems below $12+\log\mathrm{O/H}\lesssim 8.0$ ($Z/Z_\odot \lesssim 1/5$) presenting minimal stellar wind features and prominent nebular emission in He II and C IV. This is consistent with nearly an order of magnitude increase in ionizing photon production beyond the $\mathrm{He^+}$-ionizing edge relative to H-ionizing flux as metallicity decreases below a fifth solar, well in excess of standard stellar population synthesis predictions. Our results suggest that often neglected sources of energetic radiation such as stripped binary products and very massive O-stars produce a sharper change in the ionizing spectrum with decreasing metallicity than expected. Consequently, nebular emission in C IV and He II powered by these stars may provide useful metallicity constraints in the reionization era.
  • We studied Lyman-$\alpha$ (Ly$\alpha$) escape in a statistical sample of 43 Green Peas with HST/COS Ly$\alpha$ spectra. Green Peas are nearby star-forming galaxies with strong [OIII]$\lambda$5007 emission lines. Our sample is four times larger than the previous sample and covers a much more complete range of Green Pea properties. We found that about 2/3 of Green Peas are strong Ly$\alpha$ line emitters with rest-frame Ly$\alpha$ equivalent width $>20$ \AA. The Ly$\alpha$ profiles of Green Peas are diverse. The Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction, defined as the ratio of observed Ly$\alpha$ flux to intrinsic Ly$\alpha$ flux, shows anti-correlations with a few Ly$\alpha$ kinematic features -- both the blue peak and red peak velocities, the peak separations, and FWHM of the red portion of the Ly$\alpha$ profile. Using properties measured from SDSS optical spectra, we found many correlations -- Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction generally increases at lower dust reddening, lower metallicity, lower stellar mass, and higher [OIII]/[OII] ratio. We fit their Ly$\alpha$ profiles with the HI shell radiative transfer model and found Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction anti-correlates with the best-fit $N_{HI}$. Finally, we fit an empirical linear relation to predict Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction from the dust extinction and Ly$\alpha$ red peak velocity. The standard deviation of this relation is about 0.3 dex. This relation can be used to isolate the effect of IGM scatterings from Ly$\alpha$ escape and to probe the IGM optical depth along the line of sight of each $z>7$ Ly$\alpha$ emission line galaxy in the JWST era.
  • Green Peas are nearby analogs of high-redshift Ly$\alpha$-emitting galaxies. To probe their Ly$\alpha$ escape, we study the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ and UV continuum emission of 24 Green Pea galaxies using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We extract the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ emission from their 2D COS spectra, and of UV continuum from both the 2D spectra and NUV images. The Ly$\alpha$ emission shows more extended spatial profiles than the UV continuum in most Green Peas. The deconvolved Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) of the Ly$\alpha$ spatial profile is about 2 to 4 times that of the UV continuum in most cases. Since Green Peas are analogs of high-z LAEs, it suggests that most high-z LAEs likely have larger Ly$\alpha$ sizes than UV sizes. We also compare the spatial profiles of Ly$\alpha$ photons at blueshifted and redshifted velocities in eight Green Peas with sufficient data quality, and find the blue wing of the Ly$\alpha$ line has a larger spatial extent than the red wing in four Green Peas with comparatively weak blue Ly$\alpha$ line wings. We show that Green Peas and MUSE $z=3-6$ LAEs have similar Ly$\alpha$ and UV continuum sizes, which probably suggests starbursts in both low-z and high-z LAEs drive similar gas outflows illuminated by Ly$\alpha$ light. Five Lyman continuum (LyC) leakers in this sample have similar Ly$\alpha$ to UV continuum size ratios (~1.4-4.3) to the other Green Peas, indicating their LyC emission escape through ionized holes in the interstellar medium.
  • We investigate how star formation is spatially organized in the grand-design spiral NGC 1566 from deep HST photometry with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). Our contour-based clustering analysis reveals 890 distinct stellar conglomerations at various levels of significance. These star-forming complexes are organized in a hierarchical fashion with the larger congregations consisting of smaller structures, which themselves fragment into even smaller and more compact stellar groupings. Their size distribution, covering a wide range in length-scales, shows a power-law as expected from scale-free processes. We explain this shape with a simple "fragmentation and enrichment" model. The hierarchical morphology of the complexes is confirmed by their mass--size relation which can be represented by a power-law with a fractional exponent, analogous to that determined for fractal molecular clouds. The surface stellar density distribution of the complexes shows a log-normal shape similar to that for supersonic non-gravitating turbulent gas. Between 50 and 65 per cent of the recently-formed stars, as well as about 90 per cent of the young star clusters, are found inside the stellar complexes, located along the spiral arms. We find an age-difference between young stars inside the complexes and those in their direct vicinity in the arms of at least 10 Myr. This timescale may relate to the minimum time for stellar evaporation, although we cannot exclude the in situ formation of stars. As expected, star formation preferentially occurs in spiral arms. Our findings reveal turbulent-driven hierarchical star formation along the arms of a grand-design galaxy.
  • We present the science cases and technological discussions that came from the workshop entitled "Finding the UV-Visible Path Forward" held at NASA GSFC June 25-26, 2015. The material presented outlines the compelling science that can be enabled by a next generation space-based observatory dedicated for UV-visible science, the technologies that are available to include in that observatory design, and the range of possible alternative launch approaches that could also enable some of the science. The recommendations to the Cosmic Origins Program Analysis Group from the workshop attendees on possible future development directions are outlined.
  • We study the ionization structure of galactic outflows in 37 nearby, star forming galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We use the O I, Si II, Si III, and Si IV ultraviolet absorption lines to characterize the different ionization states of outflowing gas. We measure the equivalent widths, line widths, and outflow velocities of the four transitions, and find shallow scaling relations between them and galactic stellar mass and star formation rate. Regardless of the ionization potential, lines of similar strength have similar velocities and line widths, indicating that the four transitions can be modeled as a co-moving phase. The Si equivalent width ratios (e.g. Si IV/Si II) have low dispersion, and little variation with stellar mass; while ratios with O I and Si vary by a factor of 2 for a given stellar mass. Photo-ionization models reproduce these equivalent width ratios, while shock models under predict the relative amount of high ionization gas. The photo-ionization models constrain the ionization parameter (U) between -2.25 < log(U) < -1.5, and require that the outflow metallicities are greater than 0.5 Z$_\odot$. We derive ionization fractions for the transitions, and show that the range of ionization parameters and stellar metallicities leads to a factor of 1.15-10 variation in the ionization fractions. Historically, mass outflow rates are calculated by converting a column density measurement from a single metal ion into a total Hydrogen column density using an ionization fraction, thus mass outflow rates are sensitive to the assumed ionization structure of the outflow.
  • We investigate a novel Bayesian analysis method, based on the Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies (slug) code, to derive the masses, ages, and extinctions of star clusters from integrated light photometry. Unlike many analysis methods, slug correctly accounts for incomplete IMF sampling, and returns full posterior probability distributions rather than simply probability maxima. We apply our technique to 621 visually-confirmed clusters in two nearby galaxies, NGC 628 and NGC 7793, that are part of the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). LEGUS provides Hubble Space Telescope photometry in the NUV, U, B, V, and I bands. We analyze the sensitivity of the derived cluster properties to choices of prior probability distribution, evolutionary tracks, IMF, metallicity, treatment of nebular emission, and extinction curve. We find that slug's results for individual clusters are insensitive to most of these choices, but that the posterior probability distributions we derive are often quite broad, and sometimes multi-peaked and quite sensitive to the choice of priors. In contrast, the properties of the cluster population as a whole are relatively robust against all of these choices. We also compare our results from slug to those derived with a conventional non-stochastic fitting code, Yggdrasil. We show that slug's stochastic models are generally a better fit to the observations than the deterministic ones used by Yggdrasil. However, the overall properties of the cluster populations recovered by both codes are qualitatively similar.
  • We report on a sample of 51 nearby, star-forming galaxies observed with the Cosmic Origin Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We calculate Si II kinematics and densities arising from warm gas entrained in galactic outflows. We use multi-wavelength ancillary data to estimate stellar masses (M$_\ast$), star-formation rates (SFR), and morphologies. We derive significant correlations between outflow velocity and SFR$^{\sim 0.1}$, M$_\ast^{\sim 0.1}$ and v$_\text{circ}^{\sim 1/2}$. Some mergers drive outflows faster than these relations prescribe, launching the outflow faster than the escape velocity. Calculations of the mass outflow rate reveal strong scaling with SFR$^{\sim 1/2}$ and M$_\ast^{\sim 1/2}$. Additionally, mass-loading efficiency factors (mass outflow rate divided by SFR) scale approximately as M$_\ast^{-1/2}$. Both the outflow velocity and mass-loading scaling suggest that these outflows are powered by supernovae, with only 0.7% of the total supernovae energy converted into the kinetic energy of the warm outflow. Galaxies lose some gas if log(M$_\ast$/M$_\odot$) < $9.5$, while more massive galaxies retain all of their gas, unless they undergo a merger. This threshold for gas loss can explain the observed shape of the mass-metallicity relation.
  • Deep spectroscopic observations of z~6.5 galaxies have revealed a marked decline with increasing redshift in the detectability of Lyman-alpha emission. While this may offer valuable insight into the end of the reionisation process, it presents a fundamental challenge to the detailed spectroscopic study of the many hundreds of photometrically-selected distant sources now being found via deep HST imaging, and particularly those bright sources viewed through foreground lensing clusters. In this paper we demonstrate the validity of a new way forward via the convincing detection of an alternative diagnostic line, CIII]1909, seen in spectroscopic exposures of two star forming galaxies at z=6.029 and 7.213. The former detection is based on a 3.5 hour X-shooter spectrum of a bright (J=25.2) gravitationally-lensed galaxy behind the cluster Abell 383. The latter detection is based on a 4.2 hour MOSFIRE spectra of one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxies, GN-108036, with J=25.2. Both targets were chosen for their continuum brightness and previously-known redshift (based on Lyman-alpha), ensuring that any CIII] emission would be located in a favorable portion of the near-infrared sky spectrum. We compare our CIII] and Lyman-alpha equivalent widths in the context of those found at z~2 from earlier work and discuss the motivation for using lines other than Lyman-alpha to study galaxies in the reionisation era.
  • We present deep spectroscopy of 17 very low mass (M* ~ 2.0x10^6 Msun to 1.4x10^9 Msun) and low luminosity (M_UV ~ -13.7 to -19.9) gravitationally lensed galaxies in the redshift range z~1.5-3.0. Deep rest-frame ultraviolet spectra reveal large equivalent width emission from numerous lines (NIV], OIII], CIV, Si III], CIII]) which are rarely seen in individual spectra of more massive star forming galaxies. CIII] is detected in 16 of 17 low mass star forming systems with rest-frame equivalent widths as large as 13.5 Angstroms. Nebular CIV emission is present in the most extreme CIII] emitters, requiring an ionizing source capable of producing a substantial component of photons with energies in excess of 47.9 eV. Photoionization models support a picture whereby the large equivalent widths are driven by the increased electron temperature and enhanced ionizing output arising from metal poor gas and stars, young stellar populations, and large ionization parameters. The young ages implied by the emission lines and continuum SEDs indicate that the extreme line emitters in our sample are in the midst of a significant upturn in their star formation activity. The low stellar masses, blue UV colors, and large sSFRs of our sample are similar to those of typical z>6 galaxies. Given the strong attenuation of Ly-alpha in z>6 galaxies we suggest that CIII] is likely to provide our best probe of early star forming galaxies with ground-based spectrographs and one of the most efficient means of confirming z>10 galaxies with the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Super star cluster A1 in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 3125 is characterized by broad He\ii \lam1640 emission (full width at half maximum, $FWHM\sim1200$ km s$^{-1}$) of unprecedented strength (equivalent width, $EW=7.1\pm0.4$ \AA). Previous attempts to characterize the massive star content in NGC 3125-A1 were hampered by the low resolution of the UV spectrum and the lack of co-spatial panchromatic data. We obtained far-UV to near-IR spectroscopy of the two principal emitting regions in the galaxy with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (\hst). We use these data to study three clusters in the galaxy, A1, B1, and B2. We derive cluster ages of 3-4 Myr, intrinsic reddenings of $E(B-V)=0.13$, 0.15, and 0.13, and cluster masses of $1.7\times10^5$, $1.4\times10^5$, and $1.1\times10^5$ M$_\odot$, respectively. A1 and B2 show O\vb \lam1371 absorption from massive stars, which is rarely seen in star-forming galaxies, and have Wolf-Rayet (WR) to O star ratios of $N(WN5-6)/N(O)=0.23$ and 0.10, respectively. The high $N(WN5-6)/N(O)$ ratio of A1 cannot be reproduced by models that use a normal IMF and generic WR star line luminosities. We rule out that the extraordinary He\ii \lam1640 emission and O\vb \lam1371 absorption of A1 are due to an extremely flat upper IMF exponent, and suggest that they originate in the winds of very massive ($>120\,M_\odot$) stars. In order to reproduce the properties of peculiar clusters such as A1, the present grid of stellar evolution tracks implemented in Starburst99 needs to be extended to masses $>120\,M_\odot$.
  • We obtained medium-resolution ultraviolet (UV) spectra between 1150 and 1450 Angstroms of the four UV-bright, infrared (IR)-luminous starburst galaxies IRAS F08339+6517, NGC 3256, NGC 6090, and NGC 7552 using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The selected sightlines towards the starburst nuclei probe the properties of the recently formed massive stars and the physical conditions in the starburst-driven galactic superwinds. Despite being metal-rich and dusty, all four galaxies are strong Lyman-alpha emitters with equivalent widths ranging between 2 and 13 Angstroms. The UV spectra show strong P Cygni-type high-ionization features indicative of stellar winds and blueshifted low-ionization lines formed in the interstellar and circumgalactic medium. We detect outflowing gas with bulk velocities of about 400 km/s and maximum velocities of almost 900 km/s. These are among the highest values found in the local universe and comparable to outflow velocities found in luminous Lyman-break galaxies at intermediate and high redshift. The outflow velocities are unlikely to be high enough to cause escape of material from the galactic gravitational potential. However, the winds are significant for the evolution of the galaxies by transporting heavy elements from the starburst nuclei and enriching the galaxy halos. The derived mass outflow rates of ~100 Msol/yr are comparable to, or even higher than the star-formation rates. The outflows can quench star formation and ultimately regulate the starburst as has been suggested for high-redshift galaxies.
  • We describe observations in the nearby universe (<100 Mpc) with a 10-m or larger space-based telescope having imaging and spectral capabilities in the range 912-9000 \AA that would enable advances in the fields of massive stars, young populations, and star-forming galaxies, that are essential for achieving the Cosmic Origins Program objectives i) how are the chemical elements distributed in galaxies and dispersed in the circumgalactic and intergalactic medium; and ii) when did the first stars in the universe form, and how did they influence their environments. We stress the importance of observing hundreds of massive stars and their descendants individually, which will make it possible to separate the many competing factors that influence the observed properties of these systems (mass, composition, convection, mass-loss, rotation rate, binarity, magnetic fields, and cluster mass).
  • We analyze archival HST/STIS/FUV-MAMA imaging and spectroscopy of 13 compact star clusters within the circumnuclear starburst region of M83, the closest such example. We compare the observed spectra with semi-empirical models, which are based on an empirical library of Galactic O and B stars observed with IUE, and with theoretical models, which are based on a new theoretical UV library of hot massive stars computed with WM-Basic. The models were generated with Starburst99 for metallicities of Z=0.020 and Z=0.040, and for stellar IMFs with upper mass limits of 10, 30, 50, and 100 M_sol. We estimate the ages and masses of the clusters from the best fit model spectra, and find that the ages derived from the semi-empirical and theoretical models agree within a factor of 1.2 on average. A comparison of the spectroscopic age estimates with values derived from HST/WFC3/UVIS multi-band photometry shows a similar level of agreement for all but one cluster. The clusters have a range of ages from about 3 to 20 Myr, and do not appear to have an age gradient along M83's starburst. Clusters with strong P-Cygni profiles have masses of a few times 10^4 M_sol, seem to have formed stars more massive than 30 M_sol, and are consistent with a Kroupa IMF from 0.1-100 M_sol. Field regions in the starburst lack P-Cygni profiles and are dominated by B stars.
  • The circumnuclear starburst of M83 (NGC 5236), the nearest such example (4.6 Mpc), constitutes an ideal site for studying the massive star IMF at high metallicity (12+log[O/H]=9.1$\pm$0.2, Bresolin & Kennicutt 2002). We analyzed archival HST/STIS FUV imaging and spectroscopy of 13 circumnuclear star clusters in M83. We compared the observed spectra with two types of single stellar population (SSP) models, semi-empirical models, which are based on an empirical library of Galactic O and B stars observed with IUE (Robert et al. 1993), and theoretical models, which are based on a new theoretical UV library of hot massive stars described in Leitherer et al. (2010) and computed with WM-Basic (Pauldrach et al. 2001). The models were generated with Starburst99 (Leitherer & Chen 2009). We derived the reddenings, the ages, and the masses of the clusters from model fits to the FUV spectroscopy, as well as from optical HST/WFC3 photometry.
  • In general, HII regions do not show clear signs of self-enrichment in products from massive stars (M > 8 M_sun). In order to explore why, I modeled the contamination with Wolf-Rayet star ejecta of metal-poor (Z=0.001) HII regions, ionised either by a 10^6 M_sun cluster of coeval stars (cluster 1), or a cluster resulting from continuous star formation at a rate of 1 M_sun yr^-1 (cluster 2). The clusters have Z=0.001 and a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) from 0.1 to 120 M_sun. Independent one dimensional constant density simulations of the emission-line spectra of unenriched HII regions were computed at the discrete ages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Myr, with the photoionisation code CLOUDY, using as input, radiative and mechanical stellar feedbacks predicted by the evolutionary synthesis code STARBURST99. Each HII region was placed at the outer radius of the adiabatically expanding superbubble of Mac Low and McCray (1988). For models with thermal and ionisation balance time-scales of less than 1 Myr, and with oxygen emission-line ratios in agreement with observations, the interior of the superbubble and the HII region were uniformly and instantaneously polluted with stellar ejecta predicted by STARBURST99. I obtained a maximum oxygen abundance enhancement of 0.025 dex, with cluster 1, at 4 Myr. It would be unobservable.