• The 9.7$\mu$m interstellar spectral feature, arising from the Si--O stretch of amorphous silicate dust, is the strongest extinction feature in the infrared (IR). In principle, the spectral profile of this feature could allow one to diagnose the mineralogical composition of interstellar silicate material. However, observationally, the 9.7$\mu$m interstellar silicate extinction profile is not well determined. Here we utilize the Spitzer/IRS spectra of five early-type (one O- and four B-type) stars and compare them with that of unreddened stars of the same spectral type to probe the interstellar extinction of silicate dust around 9.7$\mu$m. We find that, while the silicate extinction profiles all peak at ~9.7$\mu$m, two stars exhibit a narrow feature of FWHM ~2.0$\mu$m and three stars display a broad feature of FWHM ~3.0$\mu$m. We also find that the width of the 9.7$\mu$m extinction feature does not show any environmental dependence. With a FWHM of ~2.2$\mu$m, the mean 9.7\mu m extinction profile, obtained by averaging over our five stars, closely resembles that of the prototypical diffuse interstellar medium along the lines of sight toward Cyg OB2 No.12 and WR 98a. Finally, an analytical formula is presented to parameterize the interstellar extinction in the IR at $0.9\mu {\rm m} < \lambda < 15\mu {\rm m}$.
  • We present a new method to decompose the emission features of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from mid-infrared spectra using theoretical PAH templates in conjunction with modified blackbody components for the dust continuum and an extinction term. The primary goal is to obtain robust measurements of the PAH features, which are sensitive to the star formation rate, in a variety of extragalactic environments. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique, starting with the simplest Galactic high-latitude clouds to extragalactic systems of ever-increasing complexity, from normal star-forming galaxies to low-luminosity active galaxies, quasars, and heavily obscured infrared-luminous galaxies. In addition to providing accurate measurements of the PAH emission, including upper limits thereof, our fits can reproduce reasonably well the overall continuum shape and constrain the line-of-sight extinction. Our new PAH line flux measurements differ systematically and significantly from those of previous methods, by ~15% to as much as a factor of ~6. The decomposed PAH spectra show remarkable similarity among different systems, suggesting a uniform set of conditions responsible for their excitation.
  • The possible detection of C_{24}, a planar graphene, recently reported in several planetary nebulae by Garciaa-Hernandez et al. (2011, 2012) inspires us to explore whether and how much graphene could exist in the interstellar medium (ISM) and how it would reveal its presence through its ultraviolet (UV) extinction and infrared (IR) emission. In principle, interstellar graphene could arise from the photochemical processing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules which are abundant in the ISM through a complete loss of their hydrogen atoms and/or from graphite which is thought to be a major dust species in the ISM through fragmentation caused by grain-grain collisional shattering. Both quantum-chemical computations and laboratory experiments have shown that the exciton-dominated electronic transitions in graphene cause a strong absorption band near 2755 Angstrom. We calculate the UV absorption of graphene and place an upper limit of ~5 ppm of C/H (i.e., ~1.9\% of the total interstellar C) on the interstellar graphene abundance. We also model the stochastic heating of graphene C_{24} excited by single starlight photons of the interstellar radiation field in the ISM and calculate its IR emission spectra. We also derive the abundance of graphene in the ISM to be <5 ppm of C/H by comparing the model emission spectra with that observed in the ISM.
  • Spinning small silicate grains were recently invoked to account for the Galactic foreground anomalous microwave emission. These grains, if present, will absorb starlight in the far ultraviolet (UV). There is also renewed interest in attributing the enigmatic 2175 Angstrom interstellar extinction bump to small silicates. To probe the role of silicon in the UV extinction, we explore the relations between the amount of silicon required to be locked up in silicates [Si/H]_{dust} and the 2175 Angstrom bump or the far-UV extinction rise, based on an analysis of the extinction curves along 46 Galactic sightlines for which the gas-phase silicon abundance [Si/H]_{gas} is known. We derive [Si/H]_{dust} either from {[Si/H]_{ISM} - [Si/H]_{gas}} or from the Kramers-Kronig relation which relates the wavelength-integrated extinction to the total dust volume, where [Si/H]_{ISM} is the interstellar silicon reference abundance and taken to be that of proto-Sun or B stars. We also derive [Si/H]_{dust} from fitting the observed extinction curves with a mixture of amorphous silicates and graphitic grains. We find that in all three cases [Si/H]_{dust} shows no correlation with the 2175 Angstrom bump, while the carbon depletion [C/H]_{dust} tends to correlate with the 2175 Angstrom bump. This supports carbon grains instead of silicates as the possible carrier of the 2175 Angstrom bump. We also find that neither [Si/H]_{dust} nor [C/H]_{dust} alone correlates with the far-UV extinction, suggesting that the far-UV extinction is a combined effect of small carbon grains and silicates.
  • We investigate the relation between the optical extinction ($A_V$) and the hydrogen column density ($N_H$) determined from X-ray observations of a large sample of Galactic sightlines toward 35 supernova remnants, 6 planetary nebulae, and 70 X-ray binaries for which $N_H$ was determined in the literature with solar abundances. We derive an average ratio of ${N_H}/{A_V}=(2.08\pm0.02)\times10^{21}{\rm H\, cm^{-2}\, mag^{-1}}$ for the whole Galaxy. We find no correlation between ${N_H}/{A_V}$ and the number density of hydrogen, the distance away from the Galactic centre, and the distance above or below the Galactic plane. The ${N_H}/{A_V}$ ratio is generally invariant across the Galaxy, with ${N_H}/{A_V}=(2.04\pm0.05)\times10^{21}{\rm H\, cm^{-2}\, mag^{-1}}$ for the 1st and 4th Galactic quadrants and ${N_H}/{A_V}=(2.09\pm0.03)\times10^{21}{\rm H\, cm^{-2}\, mag^{-1}}$ for the 2nd and 3rd Galactic quadrants. We also explore the distribution of hydrogen in the Galaxy by enlarging our sample with additional 74 supernova remnants for which both $N_H$ and distances are known. We find that, between the Galactic radius of 2 kpc to 10 kpc, the vertical distribution of hydrogen can be roughly described by a Gaussian function with a scale height of $h=75.5\pm12.4\,{\rm pc}$ and a mid-plane density of $n_{H}(0)=1.11\pm0.15\,{\rm cm^{-3}}$, corresponding to a total gas surface density of ${\sum}_{gas}{\sim}7.0\,{M_{\bigodot}}\,{\rm pc^{-2}}$. We also compile $N_H$ from 19 supernova remnants and 29 X-ray binaries for which $N_H$ was determined with subsolar abundances. We obtain ${N_H}/{A_V}=(2.47\pm0.04)\times10^{21}{\rm H\, cm^{-2}\, mag^{-1}}$ which exceeds that derived with solar abundances by $\sim$20%. We suggest that in future studies one may simply scale $N_H$ derived from subsolar abundances by a factor of $\sim$1.2 when converting to $N_H$ of solar abundances.
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments, as revealed by their pronounced emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 $\mu$m commonly ascribed to the C--H and C--C vibrational modes. Although these features have long been predicted to be polarized, previous searches for PAH polarization led to null or, at best, tentative detections. Here we report the definite detection of polarized PAH emission at 11.3 $\mu$m in the nebula associated with the Herbig Be star MWC 1080. We measure a polarization degree of 1.9$\pm$0.2\%, which is unexpectedly high compared to models. This poses a challenge in the current understanding of the alignment of PAHs, which is required to polarize the PAH emission but thought to be substantially suppressed. PAH alignment with a magnetic field via a resonance paramagnetic relaxation process may account for such a high level of polarization.
  • Dust plays a central role in the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Whether the dust that forms the torus around an AGN is tenth-$\mu$m-sized like interstellar grains or much larger has a profound impact on correcting for the obscuration of the dust torus to recover the intrinsic spectrum and luminosity of the AGN. Here we show that the ratio of the optical extinction in the visual band ($A_V$) to the optical depth of the 9.7 $\mu$m silicate absorption feature ($\Delta\tau_{9.7}$) could potentially be an effective probe of the dust size. The anomalously lower ratio of $A_V/\Delta\tau_{9.7} \approx 5.5$ of AGNs compared to that of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium of $A_V/\Delta\tau_{9.7} \approx 18$ reveals that the dust in AGN torus could be substantially larger than the interstellar grains of the Milky Way and of the Small Magellanic Cloud, and therefore, one might expect a flat extinction curve for AGNs.
  • The "unidentified" infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 $\mu$m are ubiquitously seen in various astrophysical regions. The UIE features are characteristic of the stretching and bending vibrations of aromatic hydrocarbons. The 3.3 $\mu$m feature resulting from aromatic C--H stretches is often accompanied by a weaker feature at 3.4 $\mu$m often attributed to aliphatic C--H stretches. The ratio of the observed intensity of the 3.3 $\mu$m aromatic C--H feature ($I_{3.3}$) to that of the 3.4 $\mu$m aliphatic C--H feature ($I_{3.4}$) allows one to estimate the aliphatic fraction (i.e. $N_{\rm C,aliph}/N_{\rm C,arom}$, the number of C atoms in aliphatic units to that in aromatic rings) of the UIE carriers, provided the intrinsic oscillator strengths of the 3.3 $\mu$m aromatic C--H stretch ($A_{3.3}$) and the 3.4 $\mu$m aliphatic C--H stretch ($A_{3.4}$) are known. In this article we summarize the computational results on $A_{3.3}$ and $A_{3.4}$ and their implications for the aromaticity and aliphaticity of the UIE carriers. We use density functional theory and second-order perturbation theory to derive $A_{3.3}$ and $A_{3.4}$ from the infrared vibrational spectra of seven PAHs with various aliphatic substituents (e.g., methyl-, dimethyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, butyl-PAHs, and PAHs with unsaturated alkyl-chains). The mean band strengths of the aromatic ($A_{3.3}$) and aliphatic ($A_{3.4}$) C--H stretches are derived and then employed to estimate the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers by comparing $A_{3.4}$/$A_{3.3}$ with $I_{3.4}$/$I_{3.3}$. We conclude that the UIE emitters are predominantly aromatic, as revealed by the observationally-derived ratio <$I_{3.4}$/$I_{3.3}$> ~ 0.12 and the computationally-derived ratio <$A_{3.4}$/$A_{3.3}$> ~ 1.76 which suggest an upper limit of $N_{\rm C,aliph}/N_{\rm C,arom}$ ~ 0.02 for the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers.
  • The so-called unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 $\mu$m ubiquitously seen in a wide variety of astrophysical regions are generally attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Astronomical PAHs may have an aliphatic component as revealed by the detection in many UIE sources of the aliphatic C-H stretching feature at 3.4 $\mu$m. The ratio of the observed intensity of the 3.4 $\mu$m feature to that of the 3.3 $\mu$m aromatic C-H feature allows one to estimate the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers. This requires the knowledge of the intrinsic oscillator strengths of the 3.3 $\mu$m aromatic C-H stretch ($A_{3.3}$) and the 3.4 $\mu$m aliphatic C-H stretch ($A_{3.4}$). Lacking experimental data on $A_{3.3}$ and $A_{3.4}$ for the UIE candidate materials, one often has to rely on quantum-chemical computations. Although the second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory with a large basis set is more accurate than the B3LYP density functional theory, MP2 is computationally very demanding and impractical for large molecules. Based on methylated PAHs, we show here that, by scaling the band strengths computed at an inexpensive level (e.g., B3LYP/6-31G*) we are able to obtain band strengths as accurate as that computed at far more expensive levels (e.g., MP2/6-311+G(3df,3pd)).
  • This is an editorial to the special issue on Cosmic Dust VIII.
  • A distinct set of broad emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 $\mu$m, is often detected in protoplanetary disks (PPDs). These features are commonly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We model these emission features in the infrared spectra of 69 PPDs around 14 T Tauri and 55 Herbig Ae/Be stars in terms of astronomical-PAHs. For each PPD, we derive the size distribution and the charge state of PAHs. We then examine the correlations of the PAH properties (i.e., sizes and ionization fractions) with the stellar properties (e.g., stellar effective temperature, luminosity, and mass). We find that the characteristic size of PAHs shows a tendency of correlating with the stellar effective temperature ($T_{\rm eff}$) and interpret this as the preferential photodissociation of small PAHs in systems with higher $T_{\rm eff}$ of which the stellar photons are more energetic. In addition, the PAH size shows a moderate correlation with the red-ward wavelength-shift of the 7.7 $\mu$m PAH feature that is commonly observed in disks around cool stars. The ionization fraction of PAHs does not seem to correlate with any stellar parameters. This is because the charging of PAHs depends on not only the stellar properties (e.g., $T_{\rm eff}$, luminosity) but also the spatial distribution of PAHs in the disks. The mere negative correlation between the PAH size and the stellar age suggests that continuous replenishment of PAHs via the outgassing of cometary bodies and/or the collisional grinding of planetesimals and asteroids is required to maintain the abundance of small PAHs against complete destruction by photodissociation.
  • For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass loss rates of these sources by modeling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ~0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.
  • The unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) hypothesizes that all AGNs are surrounded by an anisotropic dust torus and are essentially the same objects but viewed from different angles. However, little is known about the dust which plays a central role in the unification theory. There are suggestions that the AGN dust extinction law appreciably differs from that of the Galaxy. Also, the silicate emission features observed in type 1 AGNs appear anomalous (i.e., their peak wavelengths and widths differ considerably from that of the Galaxy). In this work, we explore the dust properties of 147 AGNs of various types at redshifts z<0.5, with special attention paid to 93 AGNs which exhibit the 9.7 and 18 $\mu$m silicate emission features. We model their silicate emission spectra obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We find that 60/93 of the observed spectra can be well explained with "astronomical silicate", while the remaining sources favor amorphous olivine or pyroxene. Most notably, all sources require the dust to be $\mu$m-sized (with a typical size of ~1.5$\pm$0.1 $\mu$m), much larger than sub-$\mu$m-sized Galactic interstellar grains, implying a flat or "gray" extinction law for AGNs. We also find that, while the 9.7 $\mu$m emission feature arises predominantly from warm silicate dust of temperature T~270 K, the ~5--8 $\mu$m continuum emission is mostly from carbon dust of T~640 K. Finally, the correlations between the dust properties (e.g., mass, temperature) and the AGN properties (e.g., luminosity, black hole mass) have also been investigated.
  • We present high-resolution (0".4) mid-infrared (mid-IR) polarimetric images and spectra of WL 16, a Herbig Ae star at a distance of 125 pc. WL 16 is surrounded by a protoplanetary disk of $\sim$ 900 AU in diameter, making it one of the most extended Herbig Ae/Be disks as seen in the mid-IR. The star is behind, or embedded in, the $\rho$ Ophiuchus molecular cloud, and obscured by 28 magnitudes of extinction at optical wavelengths by the foreground cloud. Mid-IR polarization of WL 16, mainly arises from aligned elongated dust grains present along the line of sight, suggesting a uniform morphology of polarization vectors with an orientation of 33\degr (East from North) and a polarization fraction of $\sim$ 2.0\%. This orientation is consistent with previous polarimetric surveys in the optical and near-IR bands to probe large-scale magnetic fields in the Ophiuchus star formation region, indicating that the observed mid-IR polarization toward WL 16 is produced by the dichroic absorption of magnetically aligned foreground dust grains by a uniform magnetic field. Using polarizations of WL 16 and Elias 29, a nearby polarization standard star, we constrain the polarization efficiency, \textit{$p_{10.3}/A_{10.3}$}, for the dust grains in the $\rho$ Ophiuchus molecular cloud to be $\sim$ 1.0\% mag$^{-1}$. WL 16 has polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features detected at 8.6, 11.2, 12.0, and 12.7 $\mu$m by our spectroscopic data, and we find an anti-correlation between the PAH surface brightness and the PAH ionization fraction between the NW and SW sides of the disk.
  • A large number of interstellar absorption features at ~ 4000\AA\ -- 1.8 {\mu}m, known as the "diffuse interstellar bands" (DIBs), remains unidentified. Most recent works relate them to large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules or ultrasmall carbonaceous grains which are also thought to be responsible for the 2175 \AA\ extinction bump and/or the far ultraviolet (UV) extinction rise at $\lambda^{-1} > 5.9\ {\mu}m^{-1}$. Therefore, one might expect some relation between the UV extinction and DIBs. Such a relationship, if established, could put important constraints on the carrier of DIBs. Over the past four decades, whether DIBs are related to the shape of the UV extinction curves has been extensively investigated. However, the results are often inconsistent, partly due to the inconsistencies in characterizing the UV extinction. Here we re-examine the connection between the UV extinction curve and DIBs. We compile the extinction curves and the equivalent widths of 40 DIBs along 97 slightlines. We decompose the extinction curve into three Drude-like functions composed of the visible/near-infrared component, the 2175 \AA\ bump, and the far-UV extinction at $\lambda^{-1} > 5.9\ {\mu}m^{-1}$. We argue that the wavelength-integrated far-UV extinction derived from this decomposition technique best measures the strength of the far-UV extinction. No correlation is found between the far-UV extinction and most (~90\%) of the DIBs. We have also shown that the color excess E(1300-1700), the extinction difference at 1300 \AA\ and 1700 \AA\ often used to measure the strength of the far-UV extinction, does not correlate with DIBs. Finally, we confirm the earlier findings of no correlation between the 2175 \AA\ bump and DIBs or between the 2175 \AA\ bump and the far-UV extinction.
  • The so-called unidentified infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 micrometer are ubiquitously seen in a wide variety of astrophysical regions. The UIE features are characteristic of the stretching and bending vibrations of aromatic hydrocarbon materials, e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The 3.3 micrometer aromatic C--H stretching feature is often accompanied by a weaker feature at 3.4 micrometer. The latter is often thought to result from the C--H stretch of aliphatic groups attached to the aromatic systems. The ratio of the observed intensity of the 3.3 micrometer aromatic C--H feature to that of the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic C--H feature allows one to estimate the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers, provided that the intrinsic oscillator strengths of the 3.3 micrometer aromatic C--H stretch (A3.3) and the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic C--H stretch (A3.4) are known. While previous studies on the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers were mostly based on the A3.4/A3.3 ratios derived from the mono-methyl derivatives of small PAH molecules, in this work we employ density functional theory to compute the infrared vibrational spectra of several PAH molecules with a wide range of sidegroups including ethyl, propyl, butyl, and several unsaturated alkyl chains, as well as all the isomers of dimethyl-substituted pyrene. We find that, except PAHs with unsaturated alkyl chains, the corresponding A3.4/A3.3 ratios are close to that of mono-methyl PAHs. This confirms the predominantly-aromatic nature of the UIE carriers previously inferred from the A3.4/A3.3 ratio derived from mono-methyl PAHs.
  • Although it is generally accepted that the so-called "unidentified" infrared emission (UIE) features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 micrometer are characteristic of the stretching and bending vibrations of aromatic hydrocarbon materials, the exact nature of their carriers remains unknown: whether they are free-flying, predominantly aromatic gas-phase molecules, or amorphous solids with a mixed aromatic/aliphatic composition are being debated. Recently, the 3.3 and 3.4 micrometer features which are commonly respectively attributed to aromatic and aliphatic C-H stretches have been used to place an upper limit of ~2\% on the aliphatic fraction of the UIE carriers (i.e. the number of C atoms in aliphatic chains to that in aromatic rings). Here we further explore the aliphatic versus aromatic content of the UIE carriers by examining the ratio of the observed intensity of the 6.2 micrometer aromatic C-C feature (I6.2) to that of the 6.85 micrometer aliphatic C-H deformation feature (I6.85). To derive the intrinsic oscillator strengths of the 6.2 micrometer stretch (A6.2) and the 6.85 micrometer deformation (A6.85), we employ density functional theory to compute the vibrational spectra of seven methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and their cations. By comparing I6.85/I6.2 with A6.85/A6.2, we derive the fraction of C atoms in methyl(ene) aliphatic form to be at most ~10\%, confirming the earlier finding that the UIE emitters are predominantly aromatic. We have also computed the intrinsic strength of the 7.25 micrometer feature (A7.25), another aliphatic C-H deformation band. We find that A6.85 appreciably exceeds A7.25. This explains why the 6.85 micrometer feature is more frequently detected in space than the 7.25 micrometer feature.
  • SPHEREx is a proposed SMEX mission selected for Phase A. SPHEREx will carry out the first all-sky spectral survey and provide for every 6.2" pixel a spectra between 0.75 and 4.18 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$41.4] and 4.18 and 5.00 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$135]. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. It is readily apparent, however, that many other questions in astrophysics and planetary sciences could be addressed with the SPHEREx data. The SPHEREx team convened a community workshop in February 2016, with the intent of enlisting the aid of a larger group of scientists in defining these questions. This paper summarizes the rich and varied menu of investigations that was laid out. It includes studies of the composition of main belt and Trojan/Greek asteroids; mapping the zodiacal light with unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution; identifying and studying very low-metallicity stars; improving stellar parameters in order to better characterize transiting exoplanets; studying aliphatic and aromatic carbon-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium; mapping star formation rates in nearby galaxies; determining the redshift of clusters of galaxies; identifying high redshift quasars over the full sky; and providing a NIR spectrum for most eROSITA X-ray sources. All of these investigations, and others not listed here, can be carried out with the nominal all-sky spectra to be produced by SPHEREx. In addition, the workshop defined enhanced data products and user tools which would facilitate some of these scientific studies. Finally, the workshop noted the high degrees of synergy between SPHEREx and a number of other current or forthcoming programs, including JWST, WFIRST, Euclid, GAIA, K2/Kepler, TESS, eROSITA and LSST.
  • In this work we investigate the effects of ion accretion and size-dependent dust temperatures on the abundances of both gas-phase and grain-surface species. While past work has assumed a constant areal density for icy species, we show that this assumption is invalid and the chemical differentiation over grain sizes are significant. We use a gas-grain chemical code to numerically demonstrate this in two typical interstellar conditions: dark cloud (DC) and cold neutral medium (CNM). It is shown that, although the grain size distribution variation (but with the total grain surface area unchanged) has little effect on the gas-phase abundances, it can alter the abundances of some surface species by factors up to $\sim2-4$ orders of magnitude. The areal densities of ice species are larger on smaller grains in the DC model as the consequence of ion accretion. However, the surface areal density evolution tracks are more complex in the CNM model due to the combined effects of ion accretion and dust temperature variation. The surface areal density differences between the smallest ($\sim 0.01\mu$m) and the biggest ($\sim 0.2\mu$m) grains can reach $\sim$1 and $\sim$5 orders of magnitude in the DC and CNM models, respectively.
  • We investigate the dust properties in three spectroscopically anomalous galaxies (IRAS F10398+1455, IRAS F21013-0739 and SDSS J0808+3948). Their Spitzer/IRS spectra are characterized by a steep ~5-8 micron emission continuum, strong emission bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, and prominent 10 micron silicate emission. The steep ~5-8 micron continuum and strong PAH emission features suggest the presence of starbursts, while the silicate emission is indicative of significant heating from AGNs. The simultaneous detection of these two observational properties has rarely been reported on galactic scale. We employ the PAHFIT software to estimate their starlight contributions, and the CLUMPY model for the components contributed by the AGN tori. We find that the CLUMPY model is generally successful in explaining the overall dust infrared emission, although it appears to emit too flat at the ~5-8 micron continuum to be consistent with that observed in IRAS F10398+1455 and IRAS F21013-0739. The flat ~5-8 micron continuum calculated from the CLUMPY model could arise from the adopted specific silicate opacity of Ossenkopf et al. (1992) which exceeds that of the Draine & Lee (1984) "astronomical silicate" by a factor up to 2 in the ~5-8 micron wavelength range. Future models with a variety of dust species incorporated in the CLUMPY radiation transfer regime are needed for a thorough understanding of the dust properties of these spectroscopically anomalous galaxies.
  • Over two decades ago, a prominent, mysterious emission band peaking at ~20.1 micrometer was serendipitously detected in four preplanetary nebulae (PPNe; also known as "protoplanetary nebulae"). So far, this spectral feature, designated as the "21 micrometer" feature, has been seen in 18 carbon-rich PPNe. The nature of the carriers of this feature remains unknown although many candidate materials have been proposed. The 21 micrometer sources also exhibit an equally mysterious, unidentified emission feature peaking at 30 micrometer. While the 21 micrometer feature is exclusively seen in PPNe, a short-lived evolutionary stage between the end of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and planetary nebula (PN) phases, the 30 micrometer feature is commonly observed in all stages of stellar evolution from the AGB through PPN to PNe phases. We derive the stellar mass loss rates (M_{loss}) of these 21 micrometer sources from their dust infrared (IR) emission, using the "2-DUST" radiative transfer code for axisymmetric dusty systems which allows one to distinguish the mass loss rates of the AGB phase (\dot{M_{AGB}}) from that of the superwind (\dot_{M_{SW}}) phase. We examine the correlation between \dot{M_{AGB}} or \dot_{M_{SW}} and the fluxes emitted from the 21 and 30 micrometer features. We find that both features tend to correlate with \dot{M_{AGB}}, suggesting that their carriers are probably formed in the AGB phase. The nondetection of the 21 micrometer feature in AGB stars suggests that, unlike the 30 micrometer feature, the excitation of the carriers of the 21 micrometer feature may require ultraviolet photons which are available in PPNe but not in AGB stars.
  • This is an editorial to the special issue on Cosmic Dust VII.
  • This review focuses on numerical approaches to deducing the light-scattering and thermal-emission properties of primitive dust particles in planetary systems from astronomical observations. The particles are agglomerates of small grains with sizes comparable to visible wavelength and compositions being mainly magnesium-rich silicates, iron-bearing metals, and organic refractory materials in pristine phases. These unique characteristics of primitive dust particles reflect their formation and evolution around main-sequence stars of essentially solar composition. The development of light-scattering theories has been offering powerful tools to make a thorough investigation of light scattering and thermal emission by primitive dust agglomerates in such a circumstellar environment. In particular, the discrete dipole approximation, the T-matrix method, and effective medium approximations are the most popular techniques for practical use in astronomy. Numerical simulations of light scattering and thermal emission by dust agglomerates of submicrometer-sized constituent grains have a great potential to provide new state-of-the-art knowledge of primitive dust particles in planetary systems. What is essential to this end is to combine the simulations with comprehensive collections of relevant results from not only astronomical observations, but also in-situ data analyses, laboratory sample analyses, laboratory analogue experiments, and theoretical studies on the origin and evolution of the particles.
  • We present infrared (IR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of individual star-forming regions in four extremely metal poor (EMP) galaxies with metallicity Z around Zsun/10 as observed by the Herschel Space Observatory. With the good wavelength coverage of the SED, it is found that these EMP star-forming regions show distinct SED shapes as compared to those of grand design Spirals and higher metallicity dwarfs: they have on average much higher f70um/f160um ratios at a given f160um/f250um ratio; single modified black-body (MBB) fittings to the SED at \lambda >= 100 um still reveal higher dust temperatures and lower emissivity indices compared to that of Spirals, while two MBB fittings to the full SED with a fixed emissivity index (beta = 2) show that even at 100 um about half of the emission comes from warm (50 K) dust, in contrast to the cold (~20 K) dust component. Our spatially resolved images further reveal that the far-IR colors including f70um/f160um, f160um/f250um and f250um/f350um are all related to the surface densities of young stars as traced by far-UV, 24 um and SFRs, but not to the stellar mass surface densities. This suggests that the dust emitting at wavelengths from 70 um to 350 um is primarily heated by radiation from young stars.
  • The pre-transitional disk around the Herbig Ae star HD 169142 shows a complex structure of possible ongoing planet formation in dust thermal emission from the near infrared (IR) to millimeter wavelength range. Also, a distinct set of broad emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 $\mu$m, commonly attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), are detected prominently in the HD 169142 disk. We model the spectral energy distribution (SED) as well as the PAH emission features of the HD 169142 disk simultaneously with porous dust and astronomical-PAHs taking into account the spatially resolved disk structure. Our porous dust model consisting of three distinct components that are primarily concentrated in the inner ring, middle ring, and outer disk, respectively, provides an excellent fit to the entire SED, and the PAH model closely reproduces the observed PAH features. The accretion of ice mantles onto porous dust aggregates occurs between ~16 AU and 60 AU, which overlaps with the spatial extent (~50 AU) of the observed PAH emission features. Finally, we discuss the role of PAHs in the formation of planets possibly taking place in the HD 169142 system.