• The probability density quantile (pdQ) carries essential information regarding shape and tail behavior of a location-scale family. Convergence of repeated applications of the pdQ mapping to the uniform distribution is investigated and new fixed point theorems are established. The Kullback-Leibler divergences from uniformity of these pdQs are mapped and found to be ingredients in power functions of optimal tests for uniformity against alternative shapes.
  • For integer valued random variables, the translated Poisson distributions form a flexible family for approximation in total variation, in much the same way that the normal family is used for approximation in Kolmogorov distance. Using the Stein--Chen method, approximation can often be achieved with error bounds of the same order as those for the CLT. In this paper, an analogous theory, again based on Stein's method, is developed in the multivariate context. The approximating family consists of the equilibrium distributions of a collection of Markov jump processes, whose analogues in one dimension are the immigration--death processes with Poisson distributions as equilibria. The method is illustrated by providing total variation error bounds for the approximation of the equilibrium distribution of one Markov jump process by that of another. In a companion paper, it is shown how to use the method for discrete normal approximation in ${\mathbb Z}^d$.
  • The paper applies the theory developed in Part I to the discrete normal approximation in total variation of random vectors in ${\mathbb Z}^d$. We illustrate the use of the method for sums of independent integer valued random vectors, and for random vectors exhibiting an exchangeable pair. We conclude with an application to random colourings of regular graphs.
  • Keeler, Ross and Xia (2016) recently derived approximation and convergence results, which imply that the point process formed from the signal strengths received by an observer in a wireless network under a general statistical propagation model can be modelled by an inhomogeneous Poisson point process on the positive real line. The basic requirement for the results to apply is that there must be a large number of transmitters with different locations and random propagation effects.The aim of this note is to apply some of the main results of Keeler, Ross and Xia (2016) in a less general but more easily applicable form to illustrate how the results can be applied in practice. New results are derived that show that it is the strongest signals, after being weakened by random propagation effects, that behave like a Poisson process, which supports recent experimental work.
  • Let $\eta_i$, $i\ge 1$, be a sequence of independent and identically distributed random variables with finite third moment, and let $\Delta_n$ be the total variation distance between the distribution of $S_n:=\sum_{i=1}^n\eta_i$ and the normal distribution with the same mean and variance. In this note, we show the dichotomy that either $\Delta_n=1$ for all $n$ or $\Delta_n=O\left(n^{-1/2}\right)$.
  • Many areas of agriculture rely on honey bees to provide pollination services and any decline in honey bee numbers can impact on global food security. In order to understand the dynamics of honey bee colonies we present a discrete time marked renewal process model for the size of a colony. We demonstrate that under mild conditions this attains a stationary distribution that depends on the distribution of the numbers of eggs per batch, the probability an egg hatches and the distributions of the times between batches and bee lifetime. This allows an analytic examination of the effect of changing these quantities. We then extend this model to cyclic annual effects where for example the numbers of eggs per batch and {the probability an egg hatches} may vary over the year.
  • We consider the point process of signal strengths from transmitters in a wireless network observed from a fixed position under models with general signal path loss and random propagation effects. We show via coupling arguments that under general conditions this point process of signal strengths can be well-approximated by an inhomogeneous Poisson or a Cox point processes on the positive real line. We also provide some bounds on the total variation distance between the laws of these point processes and both Poisson and Cox point processes. Under appropriate conditions, these results support the use of a spatial Poisson point process for the underlying positioning of transmitters in models of wireless networks, even if in reality the positioning does not appear Poisson. We apply the results to a number of models with popular choices for positioning of transmitters, path loss functions, and distributions of propagation effects.
  • This paper concerns the asymptotic behavior of a random variable $W_\lambda$ resulting from the summation of the functionals of a Gibbsian spatial point process over windows $Q_\lambda \uparrow R^d$. We establish conditions ensuring that $W_\lambda$ has volume order fluctuations, that is they coincide with the fluctuations of functionals of Poisson spatial point processes. We combine this result with Stein's method to deduce rates of normal approximation for $W_\lambda$, as $\lambda\to\infty$. Our general results establish variance asymptotics and central limit theorems for statistics of random geometric and related Euclidean graphs on Gibbsian input. We also establish similar limit theory for claim sizes of insurance models with Gibbsian input, the number of maximal points of a Gibbsian sample, and the size of spatial birth-growth models with Gibbsian input.
  • In the so called lightbulb process, on days r=1,..,n, out of n lightbulbs, all initially off, exactly r bulbs selected uniformly and independent of the past have their status changed from off to on, or vice versa. With W_n the number of bulbs on at the terminal time n and C_n a suitable clubbed binomial distribution, d_{TV}(W_n,C_n) \le 2.7314 \sqrt{n} e^{-(n+1)/3} for all n \ge 1. The result is shown using Stein's method.
  • Although the study of weak convergence of superpositions of point processes to the Poisson process dates back to the work of Grigelionis in 1963, it was only recently that Schuhmacher [Stochastic Process. Appl. 115 (2005) 1819--1837] obtained error bounds for the weak convergence. Schuhmacher considered dependent superposition, truncated the individual point processes to 0--1 point processes and then applied Stein's method to the latter. In this paper, we adopt a different approach to the problem by using Palm theory and Stein's method, thereby expressing the error bounds in terms of the mean measures of the individual point processes, which is not possible with Schuhmacher's approach. We consider locally dependent superposition as a generalization of the locally dependent point process introduced in Chen and Xia [Ann. Probab. 32 (2004) 2545--2569] and apply the main theorem to the superposition of thinned point processes and of renewal processes.
  • Random events in space and time often exhibit a locally dependent structure. When the events are very rare and dependent structure is not too complicated, various studies in the literature have shown that Poisson and compound Poisson processes can provide adequate approximations. However, the accuracy of approximations does not improve or may even deteriorate when the mean number of events increases. In this paper, we investigate an alternative family of approximating point processes and establish Stein's method for their approximations. We prove two theorems to accommodate respectively the positively and negatively related dependent structures. Three examples are given to illustrate that our approach can circumvent the technical difficulties encountered in compound Poisson process approximation [see Barbour & M{\aa}nsson (2002)] and our approximation error bound decreases when the mean number of the random events increases, in contrast to increasing bounds for compound Poisson process approximation.
  • Melamed's theorem states that for a Jackson queuing network, the equilibrium flow along a link follows Poisson distribution if and only if no customers can travel along the link more than once. Barbour \& Brown~(1996) considered the Poisson approximate version of Melamed's theorem by allowing the customers a small probability $p$ of travelling along the link more than once. In this paper, we prove that the customer flow process is a Poisson cluster process and then establish a general approximate version of Melamed's theorem accommodating all possible cases of $0\le p<1$.
  • For a Markov chain $\mathbf{X}=\{X_i,i=1,2,...,n\}$ with the state space $\{0,1\}$, the random variable $S:=\sum_{i=1}^nX_i$ is said to follow a Markov binomial distribution. The exact distribution of $S$, denoted $\mathcal{L}S$, is very computationally intensive for large $n$ (see Gabriel [Biometrika 46 (1959) 454--460] and Bhat and Lal [Adv. in Appl. Probab. 20 (1988) 677--680]) and this paper concerns suitable approximate distributions for $\mathcal{L}S$ when $\mathbf{X}$ is stationary. We conclude that the negative binomial and binomial distributions are appropriate approximations for $\mathcal{L}S$ when $\operatorname {Var}S$ is greater than and less than $\mathbb{E}S$, respectively. Also, due to the unique structure of the distribution, we are able to derive explicit error estimates for these approximations.
  • The polynomial birth-death distribution (abbr. as PBD) on $\ci=\{0,1,2, >...\}$ or $\ci=\{0,1,2, ..., m\}$ for some finite $m$ introduced in Brown & Xia (2001) is the equilibrium distribution of the birth-death process with birth rates $\{\alpha_i\}$ and death rates $\{\beta_i\}$, where $\a_i\ge0$ and $\b_i\ge0$ are polynomial functions of $i\in\ci$. The family includes Poisson, negative binomial, binomial and hypergeometric distributions. In this paper, we give probabilistic proofs of various Stein's factors for the PBD approximation with $\a_i=a$ and $\b_i=i+bi(i-1)$ in terms of the Wasserstein distance. The paper complements the work of Brown & Xia (2001) and generalizes the work of Barbour & Xia (2006) where Poisson approximation ($b=0$) in the Wasserstein distance is investigated. As an application, we establish an upper bound for the Wasserstein distance between the PBD and Poisson binomial distribution and show that the PBD approximation to the Poisson binomial distribution is much more precise than the approximation by the Poisson or shifted Poisson distributions.
  • Most metrics between finite point measures currently used in the literature have the flaw that they do not treat differing total masses in an adequate manner for applications. This paper introduces a new metric $\bar{d}_1$ that combines positional differences of points under a closest match with the relative difference in total mass in a way that fixes this flaw. A comprehensive collection of theoretical results about $\bar{d}_1$ and its induced Wasserstein metric $\bar{d}_2$ for point process distributions are given, including examples of useful $\bar{d}_1$-Lipschitz continuous functions, $\bar{d}_2$ upper bounds for Poisson process approximation, and $\bar{d}_2$ upper and lower bounds between distributions of point processes of i.i.d. points. Furthermore, we present a statistical test for multiple point pattern data that demonstrates the potential of $\bar{d}_1$ in applications.
  • This exposition explains the basic ideas of Stein's method for Poisson random variable approximation and Poisson process approximation from the point of view of the immigration-death process and Palm theory. The latter approach also enables us to define local dependence of point processes [Chen and Xia (2004)] and use it to study Poisson process approximation for locally dependent point processes and for dependent superposition of point processes.
  • Stein's (1972) method is a very general tool for assessing the quality of approximation of the distribution of a random element by another, often simpler, distribution. In applications of Stein's method, one needs to establish a Stein identity for the approximating distribution, solve the Stein equation and estimate the behaviour of the solutions in terms of the metrics under study. For some Stein equations, solutions with good properties are known; for others, this is not the case. Barbour and Xia (1999) introduced a perturbation method for Poisson approximation, in which Stein identities for a large class of compound Poisson and translated Poisson distributions are viewed as perturbations of a Poisson distribution. In this paper, it is shown that the method can be extended to very general settings, including perturbations of normal, Poisson, compound Poisson, binomial and Poisson process approximations in terms of various metrics such as the Kolmogorov, Wasserstein and total variation metrics. Examples are provided to illustrate how the general perturbation method can be applied.
  • We introduce a new family of distributions to approximate $\mathbb {P}(W\in A)$ for $A\subset\{...,-2,-1,0,1,2,...\}$ and $W$ a sum of independent integer-valued random variables $\xi_1$, $\xi_2$, $...,$ $\xi_n$ with finite second moments, where, with large probability, $W$ is not concentrated on a lattice of span greater than 1. The well-known Berry--Esseen theorem states that, for $Z$ a normal random variable with mean $\mathbb {E}(W)$ and variance $\operatorname {Var}(W)$, $\mathbb {P}(Z\in A)$ provides a good approximation to $\mathbb {P}(W\in A)$ for $A$ of the form $(-\infty,x]$. However, for more general $A$, such as the set of all even numbers, the normal approximation becomes unsatisfactory and it is desirable to have an appropriate discrete, nonnormal distribution which approximates $W$ in total variation, and a discrete version of the Berry--Esseen theorem to bound the error. In this paper, using the concept of zero biasing for discrete random variables (cf. Goldstein and Reinert [J. Theoret. Probab. 18 (2005) 237--260]), we introduce a new family of discrete distributions and provide a discrete version of the Berry--Esseen theorem showing how members of the family approximate the distribution of a sum $W$ of integer-valued variables in total variation.
  • The framework of Stein's method for Poisson process approximation is presented from the point of view of Palm theory, which is used to construct Stein identities and define local dependence. A general result (Theorem \refimportantproposition) in Poisson process approximation is proved by taking the local approach. It is obtained without reference to any particular metric, thereby allowing wider applicability. A Wasserstein pseudometric is introduced for measuring the accuracy of point process approximation. The pseudometric provides a generalization of many metrics used so far, including the total variation distance for random variables and the Wasserstein metric for processes as in Barbour and Brown [Stochastic Process. Appl. 43 (1992) 9-31]. Also, through the pseudometric, approximation for certain point processes on a given carrier space is carried out by lifting it to one on a larger space, extending an idea of Arratia, Goldstein and Gordon [Statist. Sci. 5 (1990) 403-434]. The error bound in the general result is similar in form to that for Poisson approximation. As it yields the Stein factor 1/\lambda as in Poisson approximation, it provides good approximation, particularly in cases where \lambda is large. The general result is applied to a number of problems including Poisson process modeling of rare words in a DNA sequence.