• The iron-based superconductors are characterized by multiple-orbital physics where all the five Fe 3$d$ orbitals get involved. The multiple-orbital nature gives rise to various novel phenomena like orbital-selective Mott transition, nematicity and orbital fluctuation that provide a new route for realizing superconductivity. The complexity of multiple-orbital also asks to disentangle the relationship between orbital, spin and nematicity, and to identify dominant orbital ingredients that dictate superconductivity. The bulk FeSe superconductor provides an ideal platform to address these issues because of its simple crystal structure and unique coexistence of superconductivity and nematicity. However, the orbital nature of the low energy electronic excitations and its relation to the superconducting gap remain controversial. Here we report direct observation of highly anisotropic Fermi surface and extremely anisotropic superconducting gap in the nematic state of FeSe superconductor by high resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements. We find that the low energy excitations of the entire hole pocket at the Brillouin zone center are dominated by the single $d_{xz}$ orbital. The superconducting gap exhibits an anti-correlation relation with the $d_{xz}$ spectral weight near the Fermi level, i.e., the gap size minimum (maximum) corresponds to the maximum (minimum) of the $d_{xz}$ spectral weight along the Fermi surface. These observations provide new insights in understanding the orbital origin of the extremely anisotropic superconducting gap in FeSe superconductor and the relation between nematicity and superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors.
  • WTe2 has attracted a great deal of attention because it exhibits extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance. The underlying origin of such a giant magnetoresistance is still under debate. Utilizing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with high energy and momentum resolutions, we reveal the complete electronic structure of WTe2. This makes it possible to determine accurately the electron and hole concentrations and their temperature dependence. We find that, with increasing the temperature, the overall electron concentration increases while the total hole concentration decreases. It indicates that the electron-hole compensation, if it exists, can only occur in a narrow temperature range, and in most of the temperature range there is an electron-hole imbalance. Our results are not consistent with the perfect electron-hole compensation picture that is commonly considered to be the cause of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2. We identified a flat band near the Brillouin zone center that is close to the Fermi level and exhibits a pronounced temperature dependence. Such a flat band can play an important role in dictating the transport properties of WTe2. Our results provide new insight on understanding the origin of the unusual magnetoresistance in WTe2.
  • Quantum topological materials, exemplified by topological insulators, three-dimensional Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently because of their unique electronic structure and physical properties. Very lately it is proposed that the three-dimensional Weyl semimetals can be further classified into two types. In the type I Weyl semimetals, a topologically protected linear crossing of two bands, i.e., a Weyl point, occurs at the Fermi level resulting in a point-like Fermi surface. In the type II Weyl semimetals, the Weyl point emerges from a contact of an electron and a hole pocket at the boundary resulting in a highly tilted Weyl cone. In type II Weyl semimetals, the Lorentz invariance is violated and a fundamentally new kind of Weyl Fermions is produced that leads to new physical properties. WTe2 is interesting because it exhibits anomalously large magnetoresistance. It has ignited a new excitement because it is proposed to be the first candidate of realizing type II Weyl Fermions. Here we report our angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) evidence on identifying the type II Weyl Fermion state in WTe2. By utilizing our latest generation laser-based ARPES system with superior energy and momentum resolutions, we have revealed a full picture on the electronic structure of WTe2. Clear surface state has been identified and its connection with the bulk electronic states in the momentum and energy space shows a good agreement with the calculated band structures with the type II Weyl states. Our results provide spectroscopic evidence on the observation of type II Weyl states in WTe2. It has laid a foundation for further exploration of novel phenomena and physical properties in the type II Weyl semimetals.
  • Topological quantum materials, including topological insulators and superconductors, Dirac semimetals and Weyl semimetals, have attracted much attention recently for their unique electronic structure, spin texture and physical properties. Very lately, a new type of Weyl semimetals has been proposed where the Weyl Fermions emerge at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter, which is distinct from the standard type I Weyl semimetals with a point-like Fermi surface. The Weyl cone in this type II semimetals is strongly tilted and the related Fermi surface undergos a Lifshitz transition, giving rise to a new kind of chiral anomaly and other new physics. MoTe2 is proposed to be a candidate of a type II Weyl semimetal; the sensitivity of its topological state to lattice constants and correlation also makes it an ideal platform to explore possible topological phase transitions. By performing laser-based angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements with unprecedentedly high resolution, we have uncovered electronic evidence of type II semimetal state in MoTe2. We have established a full picture of the bulk electronic states and surface state for MoTe2 that are consistent with the band structure calculations. A single branch of surface state is identified that connects bulk hole pockets and bulk electron pockets. Detailed temperature-dependent ARPES measurements show high intensity spot-like features that is ~40 meV above the Fermi level and is close to the momentum space consistent with the theoretical expectation of the type II Weyl points. Our results constitute electronic evidence on the nature of the Weyl semimetal state that favors the presence of two sets of type II Weyl points in MoTe2.
  • The topological materials have attracted much attention recently. While three-dimensional topological insulators are becoming abundant, two-dimensional topological insulators remain rare, particularly in natural materials. ZrTe5 has host a long-standing puzzle on its anomalous transport properties; its underlying origin remains elusive. Lately, ZrTe5 has ignited renewed interest because it is predicted that single-layer ZrTe5 is a two-dimensional topological insulator and there is possibly a topological phase transition in bulk ZrTe5. However, the topological nature of ZrTe5 is under debate as some experiments point to its being a three-dimensional or quasi-two-dimensional Dirac semimetal. Here we report high-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements on ZrTe5. The electronic property of ZrTe5 is dominated by two branches of nearly-linear-dispersion bands at the Brillouin zone center. These two bands are separated by an energy gap that decreases with decreasing temperature but persists down to the lowest temperature we measured (~2 K). The overall electronic structure exhibits a dramatic temperature dependence; it evolves from a p-type semimetal with a hole-like Fermi pocket at high temperature, to a semiconductor around ~135 K where its resistivity exhibits a peak, to an n-type semimetal with an electron-like Fermi pocket at low temperature. These results indicate a clear electronic evidence of the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in ZrTe5. They provide a natural understanding on the underlying origin of the resistivity anomaly at ~135 K and its associated reversal of the charge carrier type. Our observations also provide key information on deciphering the topological nature of ZrTe5 and possible temperature-induced topological phase transition.
  • High resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on transition metal dichalcogenide PdTe2 that is a superconductor with a Tc at 1.7 K. Combined with theoretical calculations, we have discovered for the first time the existence of topologically nontrivial surface state with Dirac cone in PbTe2 superconductor. It is located at the Brillouin zone center and possesses helical spin texture. Distinct from the usual three-dimensional topological insulators where the Dirac cone of the surface state lies at the Fermi level, the Dirac point of the surface state in PdTe2 lies deep below the Fermi level at ~1.75 eV binding energy and is well separated from the bulk states. The identification of topological surface state in PdTe2 superconductor deep below the Fermi level provides a unique system to explore for new phenomena and properties and opens a door for finding new topological materials in transition metal chalcogenides.
  • The mechanism of high temperature superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors remains an outstanding issue in condensed matter physics. The electronic structure, in particular the Fermi surface topology, is considered to play an essential role in dictating the superconductivity. Recent revelation of distinct electronic structure and possible high temperature superconductivity with a transition temperature Tc above 65 K in the single-layer FeSe films grown on the SrTiO3 substrate provides key information on the roles of Fermi surface topology and interface in inducing or enhancing superconductivity. Here we report high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurement on the electronic structure and superconducting gap of a novel FeSe-based superconductor, (Li0.84Fe0.16)OHFe0.98Se, with a Tc at 41 K. We find that this single-phase bulk superconductor shows remarkably similar electronic behaviors to that of the superconducting single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film in terms of Fermi surface topology, band structure and nearly isotropic superconducting gap without nodes. These observations provide significant insights in understanding high temperature superconductivity in the single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 film in particular, and the mechanism of superconductivity in the iron-based superconductors in general.
  • Silicene, analogous to graphene, is a one-atom-thick two-dimensional crystal of silicon which is expected to share many of the remarkable properties of graphene. The buckled honeycomb structure of silicene, along with its enhanced spin-orbit coupling, endows silicene with considerable advantages over graphene in that the spin-split states in silicene are tunable with external fields. Although the low-energy Dirac cone states lie at the heart of all novel quantum phenomena in a pristine sheet of silicene, the question of whether or not these key states can survive when silicene is grown or supported on a substrate remains hotly debated. Here we report our direct observation of Dirac cones in monolayer silicene grown on a Ag(111) substrate. By performing angle-resolved photoemission measurements on silicene(3x3)/Ag(111), we reveal the presence of six pairs of Dirac cones on the edges of the first Brillouin zone of Ag(111), other than expected six Dirac cones at the K points of the primary silicene(1x1) Brillouin zone. Our result shows clearly that the unusual Dirac cone structure originates not from the pristine silicene alone but from the combined effect of silicene(3x3) and the Ag(111) substrate. This study identifies the first case of a new type of Dirac Fermion generated through the interaction of two different constituents. Our observation of Dirac cones in silicene/Ag(111) opens a new materials platform for investigating unusual quantum phenomena and novel applications based on two-dimensional silicon systems.
  • Topological insulators represent a new quantum state of matter that are insulating in the bulk but metallic on the edge or surface. In the Dirac surface state, it is well-established that the electron spin is locked with the crystal momentum. Here we report a new phenomenon of the spin texture locking with the orbital texture in a topological insulator Bi2Se3. We observe light-polarization-dependent spin texture of both the upper and lower Dirac cones that constitutes strong evidence of the orbital-dependent spin texture in Bi2Se3. The different spin texture detected in variable polarization geometry is the manifestation of the spin-orbital texture in the initial state combined with the photoemission matrix element effects. Our observations provide a new orbital degree of freedom and a new way of light manipulation in controlling the spin structure of the topological insulators that are important for their future applications in spin-related technologies.
  • The Dirac materials, such as graphene and three-dimensional topological insulators, have attracted much attention because they exhibit novel quantum phenomena with their low energy electrons governed by the relativistic Dirac equations. One particular interest is to generate Dirac cone anisotropy so that the electrons can propagate differently from one direction to the other, creating an additional tunability for new properties and applications. While various theoretical approaches have been proposed to make the isotropic Dirac cones of graphene into anisotropic ones, it has not yet been met with success. There are also some theoretical predictions and/or experimental indications of anisotropic Dirac cone in novel topological insulators and AMnBi2 (A=Sr and Ca) but more experimental investigations are needed. Here we report systematic high resolution angle-resolved photoemission measurements that have provided direct evidence on the existence of strongly anisotropic Dirac cones in SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2. Distinct behaviors of the Dirac cones between SrMnBi2 and CaMnBi2 are also observed. These results have provided important information on the strong anisotropy of the Dirac cones in AMnBi2 system that can be governed by the spin-orbital coupling and the local environment surrounding the Bi square net.
  • High resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements have been carried out on Sb(111) single crystal. Two kinds of Fermi surface sheets are observed that are derived from the topological surface states: one small hexagonal electron-like Fermi pocket around $\Gamma$ point and the other six elongated lobes of hole-like Fermi pockets around the electron pocket. Clear Rashba-type band splitting due to the strong spin-orbit coupling is observed that is anisotropic in the momentum space. Our super-high-resolution ARPES measurements reveal no obvious kink in the surface band dispersions indicating a weak electron-phonon interaction in the surface states. In particular, the electron scattering rate for these topological surface states is nearly a constant over a large energy window near the Fermi level that is unusual in terms of the conventional picture.
  • The three-dimensional topological semimetals represent a new quantum state of matter. Distinct from the surface state in the topological insulators that exhibits linear dispersion in two-dimensional momentum plane, the three-dimensional semimetals host bulk band dispersions linearly along all directions, forming discrete Dirac cones in three-dimensional momentum space. In addition to the gapless points (Weyl/Dirac nodes) in the bulk, the three-dimensional Weyl/Dirac semimetals are also characterized by "topologically protected" surface state with Fermi arcs on their specific surface. The Weyl/Dirac semimetals have attracted much attention recently they provide a venue not only to explore unique quantum phenomena but also to show potential applications. While Cd3As2 is proposed to be a viable candidate of a Dirac semimetal, more experimental evidence and theoretical investigation are necessary to pin down its nature. In particular, the topological surface state, the hallmark of the three-dimensional semimetal, has not been observed in Cd3As2. Here we report the electronic structure of Cd3As2 investigated by angle-resolved photoemission measurements on the (112) crystal surface and detailed band structure calculations. The measured Fermi surface and band structure show a good agreement with the band structure calculations with two bulk Dirac-like bands approaching the Fermi level and forming Dirac points near the Brillouin zone center. Moreover, the topological surface state with a linear dispersion approaching the Fermi level is identified for the first time. These results provide strong experimental evidence on the nature of topologically non-trivial three-dimensional Dirac cones in Cd3As2.
  • Three-dimensional topological insulators are characterized by insulating bulk state and metallic surface state involving Dirac fermions that behave as massless relativistic particles. These Dirac fermions are responsible for achieving a number of novel and exotic quantum phenomena in the topological insulators and for their potential applications in spintronics and quantum computations. It is thus essential to understand the electron dynamics of the Dirac fermions, i.e., how they interact with other electrons, phonons and disorders. Here we report super-high resolution angle-resolved photoemission studies on the Dirac fermion dynamics in the prototypical Bi2(Te,Se)3 topological insulators. We have directly revealed signatures of the electron-phonon coupling in these topological insulators and found that the electron-disorder interaction is the dominant factor in the scattering process. The Dirac fermion dynamics in Bi2(Te3-xSex) topological insulators can be tuned by varying the composition, x, or by controlling the charge carriers. Our findings provide crucial information in understanding the electron dynamics of the Dirac fermions in topological insulators and in engineering their surface state for fundamental studies and potential applications.