• In recent years, the amplitude of matter fluctuations inferred from low-redshift probes has been found to be generally lower than the value derived from cosmic microwave background observations in the $\Lambda$CDM model. This tension has been exemplified by Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and X-ray cluster counts which, when using their Planck standard cluster mass calibration, yield a value of $\sigma_8$ appreciably lower than estimations based on the latest Planck CMB measurements. In this work we examine whether non-minimal neutrino masses can alleviate this tension substantially. We use the cluster X-ray temperature distribution function derived from a flux-limited sample of local X-ray clusters, combined with Planck CMB measurements. These datasets are compared to $\Lambda$CDM predictions based on the Despali et al. (2016) mass function, adapted to account for the effects of massive neutrinos. Treating the clusters mass calibration as a free parameter, we examine whether the data favours neutrino masses appreciably higher than the minimal 0.06 eV value. Using MCMC methods, we find no significant correlation between the mass calibration of clusters and the sum of neutrino masses, meaning that massive neutrinos do not alleviate noticeably the above mentioned Planck CMB-clusters tension. The addition of other datasets (BAO and Ly-$\alpha$) reinforces those conclusions. As an alternative possible solution to the tension, we introduce a simple, phenomenological modification of gravity by letting the growth index $\gamma$ vary as an additional free parameter. We find that the cluster mass calibration is robustly correlated with the $\gamma$ parameter, insensitively to the detail of the scenario or/and additional data used. We conclude that the standard Planck mass calibration of clusters, if consolidated, would represent an evidence for new physics beyond $\Lambda$CDM with massive neutrinos.
  • The $\Lambda$CDM model is the current standard model in cosmology thanks to its ability to reproduce the observations. Its first observational evidence appeared from the type Ia supernovae (SNIa) Hubble diagram. However, there has been some debate in the literature concerning the statistical treatment of SNIa. In this paper we relax the standard assumption that SNIa intrinsic luminosity is independent of the redshift, and we examine whether it may have an impact on the accelerated nature of the expansion of the Universe. In order to be as general as possible, we reconstruct the expansion rate of the Universe through a cubic spline interpolation fitting observations of different probes: SNIa, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and the high-redshift information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We show that when SNIa intrinsic luminosity is not allowed to vary as a function of the redshift, cosmic acceleration is definitely proven in a model-independent approach. However, allowing for a redshift dependence, a non-accelerated reconstruction of the expansion rate is able to fit, as well as $\Lambda$CDM, the combination of SNIa and BAO data, both treating the BAO standard ruler $r_d$ as a free parameter, or adding the recently published prior from CMB observations. We further extend the analysis by including the CMB data, and we show that a non-accelerated reconstruction is able to nicely fit this combination of low and high-redshift data. In this work we present a model-independent reconstruction of a non-accelerated expansion rate of the Universe that is able to nicely fit all the main background cosmological probes. However, the predicted value of $H_0$ is in tension with recent direct measurements. Our analysis points out that a final, reliable, and consensual value for $H_0$ would be critical to definitively prove the cosmic acceleration in a model-independent way. [Abridged]
  • In this work we examine what are the cosmological implications of allowing the geometrical curvature density to behave independently from the energy density contents. Using the full data extracted by Planck mission from CMB, combined with BAO and SNIa measurements, we derive, in the light of this approach, new constraints on the cosmological parameters. In particular we determine the behavior of the curvature dark energy degeneracy when allowing a varying equation of state for the latter. We also examine whether this approach could bridge the gap recently found between the Hubble parameter value determined from CMB and that from the local universe measurements
  • Context: The cosmological concordance model ($\Lambda$CDM) matches the cosmological observations exceedingly well. This model has become the standard cosmological model with the evidence for an accelerated expansion provided by the type Ia supernovae (SNIa) Hubble diagram. However, the robustness of this evidence has been addressed recently with somewhat diverging conclusions. Aims: The purpose of this paper is to assess the robustness of the conclusion that the Universe is indeed accelerating if we rely only on low-redshift (z$\lesssim$2) observations, that is to say with SNIa, baryonic acoustic oscillations, measurements of the Hubble parameter at different redshifts, and measurements of the growth of matter perturbations. Methods: We used the standard statistical procedure of minimizing the $\chi^2$ function for the different probes to quantify the goodness of fit of a model for both $\Lambda$CDM and a simple nonaccelerated low-redshift power law model. In this analysis, we do not assume that supernovae intrinsic luminosity is independent of the redshift, which has been a fundamental assumption in most previous studies that cannot be tested. Results: We have found that, when SNIa intrinsic luminosity is not assumed to be redshift independent, a nonaccelerated low-redshift power law model is able to fit the low-redshift background data as well as, or even slightly better, than $\Lambda$CDM. When measurements of the growth of structures are added, a nonaccelerated low-redshift power law model still provides an excellent fit to the data for all the luminosity evolution models considered. Conclusions: Without the standard assumption that supernovae intrinsic luminosity is independent of the redshift, low-redshift probes are consistent with a nonaccelerated universe.
  • In this work we study the consequences of allowing non pressureless dark matter when determining dark energy constraints. We show that present-day dark energy constraints from low-redshift probes are extremely degraded when allowing this dark matter variation. However, adding the cosmic microwave background (CMB) we can recover the $w_{DM} = 0$ case constraints. We also show that with the future Euclid redshift survey we expect to largely improve these constraints; but, without the complementary information of the CMB, there is still a strong degeneracy between dark energy and dark matter equation of state parameters.
  • In this paper we study the consequences of relaxing the hypothesis of the pressureless nature of the dark matter component when determining constraints on dark energy. To this aim we consider simple generalized dark matter models with constant equation of state parameter. We find that present-day low-redshift probes (type-Ia supernovae and baryonic acoustic oscillations) lead to a complete degeneracy between the dark energy and the dark matter sectors. However, adding the cosmic microwave background (CMB) high-redshift probe restores constraints similar to those on the standard $\Lambda$CDM model. We then examine the anticipated constraints from the galaxy clustering probe of the future Euclid survey on the same class of models, using a Fisher forecast estimation. We show that the Euclid survey allows us to break the degeneracy between the dark sectors, although the constraints on dark energy are much weaker than with standard dark matter. The use of CMB in combination allows us to restore the high precision on the dark energy sector constraints.
  • Despite the ability of the cosmological concordance model ($\Lambda$CDM) to describe the cosmological observations exceedingly well, power law expansion of the Universe scale radius, $R(t)\propto t^n$, has been proposed as an alternative framework. We examine here these models, analyzing their ability to fit cosmological data using robust model comparison criteria. Type Ia supernovae (SNIa), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and acoustic scale information from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been used. We find that SNIa data either alone or combined with BAO can be well reproduced by both $\Lambda$CDM and power law expansion models with $n\sim 1.5$, while the constant expansion rate model $(n=1)$ is clearly disfavored. Allowing for some redshift evolution in the SNIa luminosity essentially removes any clear preference for a specific model. The CMB data are well known to provide the most stringent constraints on standard cosmological models, in particular, through the position of the first peak of the temperature angular power spectrum, corresponding to the sound horizon at recombination, a scale physically related to the BAO scale. Models with $n\geq 1$ lead to a divergence of the sound horizon and do not naturally provide the relevant scales for the BAO and the CMB. We retain an empirical footing to overcome this issue: we let the data choose the preferred values for these scales, while we recompute the ionization history in power law models, to obtain the distance to the CMB. In doing so, we find that the scale coming from the BAO data is not consistent with the observed position of the first peak of the CMB temperature angular power spectrum for any power law cosmology. Therefore, we conclude that when the three standard probes are combined, the $\Lambda$CDM model is very strongly favored over any of these alternative models, which are then essentially ruled out.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We consider a non-standard cosmological model in which the universe contains as much matter as antimatter on large scales and presents a local baryon asymmetry. A key ingredient in our approach is that the baryon density distribution follows Gaussian fluctuations around a null value $\eta = 0$. Spatial domains featuring a positive (resp. negative) baryonic density value constitute regions dominated by matter (resp. antimatter). At the domains' annihilation interface, the typical density is going smoothly to zero, rather than following an abrupt step as assumed in previous symetric matter-antimatter models. As a consequence, the Cosmic Diffuse Gamma Background produced by annihilation is drastically reduced, allowing to easily pass COMPTEL's measurements limits. Similarly the Compton $y$ distorsion and CMB 'ribbons' are lowered by an appreciable factor. Therefore this model essentially escape previous constrainst on symetric matter-antimatter models. However, we produce an estimation of the CMB temperature fluctuations that would result from this model and confront it to data acquired from the Planck satellite. We construct a angular power spectrum in $\delta T / T_{CMB}$ assuming is can be approximated as an average of $C_\ell$ over a Gaussian distribution of $\Omega_B$ using Lewis & Challinor's CAMB software. The resulting $C_\ell$ are qualitatively satisfying. We quantify the goodness of fit using a simple $\chi^2$ test. We consider two distinct scenarios in which the fluctuations on $\Omega_B$ are compensated by fluctuations on $\Omega_{CDM}$ to assure a spatially flat $\Omega_\kappa = 0$ universe or not. In both cases, out best fit have $\Delta \chi^2 \gtrsim 2400$ (with respect to a fiducial $\Lambda$CDM model), empirically excluding our model by several tens of standard deviations.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • The abundance of clusters of galaxies is known to be a potential source of cosmological constraints through their mass function. In the present work, we examine the information that can be obtained from the temperature distribution function of X-ray clusters. For this purpose, the mass-temperature ($M$-$T$) relation and its statistical properties are critical ingredients. Using a combination of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from Planck and our estimations of X-ray cluster abundances, we use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to estimate the $\Lambda$CDM cosmological parameters and the mass to X-ray temperature scaling relation simultaneously. We determine the integrated X-ray temperature function of local clusters using flux-limited surveys. A local comprehensive sample was build from the BAX X-ray cluster database, allowing us to estimate the local temperature distribution function above $\sim$1 keV. We model the expected temperature function from the mass function and the $M$-$T$ scaling relation. We then estimate the cosmological parameters and the parameters of the $M$-$T$ relation (calibration and slope) simultaneously. The measured temperature function of local clusters in the range $\sim\!\!1$-$10$ keV is well reproduced once the calibration of the $M$-$T$ relation is treated as a free parameter, and therefore is self-consistent with respect to the $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. The best-fit values of the standard cosmological parameters as well as their uncertainties are unchanged by the addition of clusters data. The calibration of the mass temperature relation, as well as its slope, are determined with $\sim10\%$ statistical uncertainties. This calibration leads to masses that are $\sim\!\!75\%$ larger than X-ray masses used in Planck.
  • The $\Lambda$CDM framework offers a remarkably good description of our universe with a very small number of free parameters, which can be determined with high accuracy from currently available data. However, this does not mean that the associated physical quantities, such as the curvature of the universe, have been directly measured. Similarly, general relativity is assumed, but not tested. Testing the relevance of general relativity for cosmology at the background level includes a verification of the relation between its energy contents and the curvature of space. Using an extended Newtonian formulation, we propose an approach where this relation can be tested. Using the recent measurements on cosmic microwave background, baryonic acoustic oscillations and the supernova Hubble diagram, we show that the prediction of general relativity is well verified in the framework of standard $\Lambda$CDM assumptions, i.e. an energy content only composed of matter and dark energy, in the form of a cosmological constant or equivalently a vacuum contribution. However, the actual equation of state of dark fluids cannot be directly obtained from cosmological observations. We found that relaxing the equation of state of dark energy opens a large region of possibilities, revealing a new type of degeneracy between the curvature and the total energy content of the universe.
  • The extremely high sensitivity and resolution of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be useful for addressing a wide set of themes relevant for cosmology, in synergy with current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) projects. Many of these themes also have a link with future optical-IR and X-ray observations. We discuss the scientific perspectives for these goals, the instrumental requirements and the observational and data analysis approaches, and identify several topics that are important for cosmology and astrophysics at different cosmic epochs.
  • The origin of the observed acceleration of the expansion of the universe is a major problem of modern cosmology and theoretical physics. Simple estimations of the contribution of vacuum to the density energy of the universe in quantum field theory are known to lead to catastrophic large values compared to observations. Such a contribution is therefore generally not regarded as a viable source for the acceleration of the expansion. In this letter we propose that the vacuum contribution actually provides a small positive value to the density energy of the universe. The underlying mechanism is a manifestation of the quantum nature of the gravitational field, through a Casimir-like effect from an additional compact dimension of space. A key ingredient is to assume that only modes with wavelength shorter than the Hubble length contribute to the vacuum. Such a contribution gives a positive energy density, has a Lorentz invariant equation of state in the usual 4D spacetime and hence can be interpreted as a cosmological constant. Its value agrees with observations for a radius of a 5th extra dimension given by $35\,\mu$m. This implies a modification of the gravitational inverse square law around this scale, close but below existing limits from experiments testing gravity at short range.
  • We present predicted Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) properties of known X-ray clusters of galaxies for which gas temperature measurements are available. The reference sample was compiled from the BAX database for X-ray clusters. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal is predicted according to two different scaling laws for the mass-temperature relation in clusters: a standard relation and an evolving relation that reproduces well the evolution of the X-ray temperature distribution function in a concordance cosmology. Using a Markov Chain Mote Carlo (MCMC) analysis we examine the values of the recovered parameters and their uncertainties. The evolving case can be clearly distinguished from the non-evolving case, showing that SZ measurements will indeed be efficient in constraining the thermal history of the intra-cluster gas. However, significant bias appears in the measured values of the evolution parameter for high SZ threshold owing to selection effects.
  • Evidence for an accelerated expansion of the universe as it has been revealed ten years ago by the Hubble diagram of distant type Ia supernovae represents one of the major modern revolutions for fundamental physics and cosmology. It is yet unclear whether the explanation of the fact that gravity becomes repulsive on large scales should be found within general relativity or within a new theory of gravitation. However, existing evidences for this acceleration all come from astrophysical observations. Before accepting a drastic revision of fundamental physics, it is interesting to critically examine the present situation of the astrophysical observations and the possible limitation in their interpretation. In this review, the main various observational probes are presented as well as the framework to interpret them with special attention to the complex astrophysics and theoretical hypotheses that may limit actual evidences for the acceleration of the expansion. Even when scrutinized with sceptical eyes, the evidence for an accelerating universe is robust. Investigation of its very origin appears as the most fascinating challenge of modern physics.
  • Galaxy cluster surveys based on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE) mapping are expected from ongoing experiments. Such surveys are anticipated to provide a significant amount of information relevant to cosmology from the number counts redshift distribution. We carry out an estimation of predicted SZE counts and their redshift distribution taking into account the current cosmological constraints and the X-ray cluster temperature distribution functions. Comparison between local and distant cluster temperature distribution functions provides evidence for an evolution in the abundance of X-ray clusters that is not consistent with the use of standard scaling relations of cluster properties in the framework of the current concordance model. The hypothesis of some evolution of the scaling law driven by non-gravitational processes is a natural solution to this problem. We perform a MCMC statistical study using COSMOMC, combining current CMB observations from WMAP, the SNIa Hubble diagram, the galaxy power spectrum data from SDSS and X-ray clusters temperature distributions to predict SZE cluster number counts. Models reproducing well the X-ray cluster temperature distribution function evolution lead to a significantly lower SZE clusters number counts with a distinctive redshift distribution. Ongoing microwave SZE surveys will therefore shed new light on intracluster gas physics and greatly help to identify the role of possible non-gravitational physics in the history of the hot gas component of x-ray clusters.
  • We examine constraints obtained from SNIa surveys on a two parameter model of dark energy in which the equation of state $w (z) = P(z) / \rho (z)$ undergoes a transition over a period significantly shorter than the Hubble time. We find that a transition between $w \sim -0.2$ and $w \sim -1$ (the first value being somewhat arbitrary) is allowed at redshifts as low as 0.1, despite the fact that data extend beyond $z \sim 1$. Surveys with the precision anticipated for space experiments should allow only slight improvement on this constraint, as a transition occurring at a redshift as low as $\sim 0.17$ could still remain undistinguishable from a standard cosmological constant. The addition of a prior on the matter density $\Omega_\MAT = 0.3$ only modestly improves the constraints. Even deep space experiments would still fail to identify a rapid transition at a redshift above 0.5. These results illustrate that a Hubble diagram of distant SNIa alone will not reveal the actual nature of dark energy at a redshift above 0.2 and that only the local dynamics of the quintessence field can be infered from a SNIa Hubble diagram. Combinations, however, seem to be very efficient: we found that the combination of present day CMB data and SNIa already excludes a transition at redshifts below 0.8.
  • We present results from a study of the X-ray cluster population that forms within the CLEF cosmological hydrodynamics simulation, a large N-body/SPH simulation of the Lambda CDM cosmology with radiative cooling, star formation and feedback. The scaled projected temperature and entropy profiles at z=0 are in good agreement with recent high-quality observations of cool core clusters, suggesting that the simulation grossly follows the processes that structure the intracluster medium (ICM) in these objects. Cool cores are a ubiquitous phenomenon in the simulation at low and high redshift, regardless of a cluster's dynamical state. This is at odds with the observations and so suggests there is still a heating mechanism missing from the simulation. Using a simple, observable measure of the concentration of the ICM, which correlates with the apparent mass deposition rate in the cluster core, we find a large dispersion within regular clusters at low redshift, but this diminishes at higher redshift, where strong "cooling-flow" systems are absent in our simulation. Consequently, our results predict that the normalisation and scatter of the luminosity-temperature relation should decrease with redshift; if such behaviour turns out to be a correct representation of X-ray cluster evolution, it will have significant consequences for the number of clusters found at high redshift in X-ray flux-limited surveys.
  • We have shown earlier that, contrary to popular belief, Einstein--de Sitter (E--deS) models can still fit the {\sl WMAP} data on the cosmic microwave background provided one adopts a low Hubble constant and relaxes the usual assumption that the primordial density perturbation is scale-free. The recent {\sl SDSS} measurement of the large-scale correlation function of luminous red galaxies at $z \sim 0.35$ has however provided a new constraint by detecting a `baryon acoustic peak'. Our best-fit E--deS models do possess a baryonic feature at a similar physical scale as the best-fit $\Lambda$CDM concordance model, but do not fit the new observations as well as the latter. In particular the shape of the correlation function in the range $\sim 10-100 h^{-1}$ Mpc cannot be reproduced properly without violating the CMB angular power spectrum in the multipole range $l \sim 100-1000$. Thus, the combination of the CMB fluctuations and the shape of the correlation function up to $\sim 100 h^{-1}$Mpc, if confirmed, does seem to require dark energy for a homogeneous cosmological model based on (adiabatic) inflationary perturbations.
  • The abundance of local clusters is a traditional way to derive the amplitude of matter fluctuations. In the present work, by assuming that the observed baryon content of clusters is representative of the universe, we show that the mass temperature relation (M-T) can be specified for any cosmological model. This approach allows one to remove most of the uncertainty coming from M-T relation, and to provide an estimation of sigma\_8 whose uncertainty is essentially statistical. The values we obtain are fortuitously almost independent of the matter density of the Universe (sigma\_8 ~ 0.6-0.63) with an accuracy better than 5%. Quite remarkably, the amplitude of matter fluctuations can be also tightly constrained to similar accuracy from existing CMB measurements alone. However, the amplitude inferred in this way in a concordance model (Lambda-CDM) is significantly larger than the value derived from the above method based on X-ray clusters. Such a discrepancy would almost disappear if the actual optical thickness of the Universe was 0 but could also be alleviated from more exotic solutions: the existence of a new dark component in the Universe as massive neutrinos. However, recent other indications of sigma\_8 favor a high normalization. In this case, the assumption that the baryonic content observed in clusters actually reflects the primordial value has to be relaxed : either there exists a large baryonic dark component in the Universe or baryons in clusters have undergone a large depletion during the formation of these structures. We concluded that the baryon fraction in clusters is not representative and therefore that an essential piece of the physics of baryons in clusters is missing in standard structure formation scenario.
  • During the last ten years astrophysical cosmology has brought three remarkable results of deep impact for fundamental physics: the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the (nearly) flatness of space, the domination of the density of the universe by some gravitationally repulsive fluid. This last result is probably the most revolutionizing one: the scientific review Sciences has considered twice results on this question as Breakthrough of the Year (for 1998 and 2003). However, direct evidence of dark energy are still rather weak, and the strength of the standard scenario relies more on the "concordance" argument rather than on the robustness of direct evidences. Furthermore, a scenario can be build in an Einstein-de Sitter universe, which reproduces as well as the concordance model the following various data relevant to cosmology: WMAP results, large scale structure of the universe, local abundance of massive clusters, weak lensing measurements, most Hubble constant measurements not based on stellar indicators. Furthermore, recent data on distant x-ray clusters obtained from XMM and Chandra indicates that the observed abundances of clusters at high redshift taken at face value favors an Einstein de Sitter model and are hard to reconcile with the concordance model. It seems wise therefore to consider that the actual existence of the dark energy is still an open question.
  • Observations of the cosmic microwave background represent a remarkable source of information for modern cosmology. Besides providing impressive support for the Big Bang model itself, they quantify the overall framework, or background, for the formation of large scale structure. Most exciting, however, is the potential access these observations give to the first moments of cosmic history and to the physics reigning at such exceptionally high energies, which will remain beyond the reach of the laboratory in any foreseeable future. Upcoming experiments, such as the Planck mission, thus offer a window onto the Physics of the Third Millennium.
  • The evolution of the temperature distribution function (TDF) of X-ray clusters is kn own to be a powerful cosmological test of the density parameter of the Universe. Recent XMM observations allows us to measure accurately the L - T relation of high redshift X-ray clusters. In order to investigate cosmological implication of this recent results, we have derived theoretical number counts for different X-ray clusters samp les, namely the RDCS, EMSS, SHARC, 160 deg^2 and MACS at z > 0.3 in different fl at models. We show that a standard hierarchical modeling of cluster distribution in a flat low density universe, normalized to the local abundance, overproduces cluster abundance at high redshift (z>0.5) by an order of magnitude. We conclude that presently existing data on X-ray clusters at high redshift strongly favor a universe with a high density of matter, insensitively to the details of the modeli ng.
  • Precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background by WMAP are believed to have established a flat $\Lambda$-dominated universe, seeded by nearly scale-invariant adiabatic primordial fluctuations. However by relaxing the hypothesis that the fluctuation spectrum can be described by a single power law, we demonstrate that an Einstein-de Sitter universe with {\em zero} cosmological constant can fit the data as well as the best concordance model. Moreover unlike a $\Lambda$-dominated universe, such an universe has no strong integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, so is in better agreement with the low quadrupole seen by WMAP. The main problem is that the Hubble constant is required to be rather low: $H_0 \simeq 46$ km/s/Mpc; we discuss whether this can be consistent with observations. Furthermore for universes consisting only of baryons and cold dark matter, the amplitude of matter fluctuations on cluster scales is too high, a problem which seems generic. However, an additional small contribution ($\Omega_X \sim 0.1$) of matter which does not cluster on small scales, e.g. relic neutrinos with mass of order eV or a `quintessence' with $w \sim 0$, can alleviate this problem. Such models provide a satisfying description of the power spectrum derived from the 2dF galaxy redshift survey and from observations of the Ly-$\alpha$ forest. We conclude that Einstein-de Sitter models can indeed accommodate all data on the large scale structure of the Universe, hence the Hubble diagram of distant Type Ia supernovae remains the only {\em direct} evidence for a non-zero cosmological constant.