• We show how the massive data compression algorithm MOPED can be used to reduce, by orders of magnitude, the number of simulated datasets that are required to estimate the covariance matrix required for the analysis of gaussian-distributed data. This is relevant when the covariance matrix cannot be calculated directly. The compression is especially valuable when the covariance matrix varies with the model parameters. In this case, it may be prohibitively expensive to run enough simulations to estimate the full covariance matrix throughout the parameter space. This compression may be particularly valuable for the next-generation of weak lensing surveys, such as proposed for Euclid and LSST, for which the number of summary data (such as band power or shear correlation estimates) is very large, $\sim 10^4$, due to the large number of tomographic redshift bins that the data will be divided into. In the pessimistic case where the covariance matrix is estimated separately for all points in an MCMC analysis, this may require an unfeasible $10^9$ simulations. We show here that MOPED can reduce this number by a factor of 1000, or a factor of $\sim 10^6$ if some regularity in the covariance matrix is assumed, reducing the number of simulations required to a manageable $10^3$, making an otherwise intractable analysis feasible.
  • We compute the Bayesian Evidence for models considered in the main analysis of Planck cosmic microwave background data. By utilising carefully-defined nearest-neighbour distances in parameter space, we reuse the Monte Carlo Markov Chains already produced for parameter inference to compute Bayes factors $B$ for many different model-dataset combinations. Standard 6-parameter flat $\Lambda$CDM model is favoured over all other models considered, with curvature being mildly favoured only when CMB lensing is not included. Many alternative models are strongly disfavoured by the data, including primordial correlated isocurvature models ($\ln B=-7.8$), non-zero scalar-to-tensor ratio ($\ln B=-4.3$), running of the spectral index ($\ln B = -4.7$), curvature ($\ln B=-3.6$), non-standard numbers of neutrinos ($\ln B=-3.1$), non-standard neutrino masses ($\ln B=-3.2$), non-standard lensing potential ($\ln B=-4.6$), evolving dark energy ($\ln B=-3.2$), sterile neutrinos ($\ln B=-6.9$), and extra sterile neutrinos with a non-zero scalar-to-tensor ratio ($\ln B=-10.8$). Other models are less strongly disfavoured with respect to flat $\Lambda$CDM. As with all analyses based on Bayesian Evidence, the final numbers depend on the widths of the parameter priors. We adopt the priors used in the Planck analysis, while performing a prior sensitivity analysis. Our quantitative conclusion is that extensions beyond the standard cosmological model are disfavoured by Planck data. Only when newer Hubble constant measurements are included does $\Lambda$CDM become disfavoured, and only mildly, compared with a dynamical dark energy model ($\ln B\sim +2$).
  • We compute the power spectrum at one-loop order in standard perturbation theory for the matter density field to which a standard Lagrangian Baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) reconstruction technique is applied. The BAO reconstruction method corrects the bulk motion associated with the gravitational evolution using the inverse Zel'dovich approximation (ZA) for the smoothed density field. We find that the overall amplitude of one-loop contributions in the matter power spectrum substantially decrease after reconstruction. The reconstructed power spectrum thereby approaches the initial linear spectrum when the smoothed density field is close enough to linear, i.e., the smoothing scale $R_s$ larger than around 10$h^{-1}$Mpc. On smaller $R_s$,however, the deviation from the linear spectrum becomes significant on large scales ($k\lt R_s^{-1}$) due to the nonlinearity in the smoothed density field, and the reconstruction is inaccurate. Compared with N-body simulations, we show that the reconstructed power spectrum at one loop order agrees with simulations better than the unreconstructed power spectrum. We also calculate the tree-level bispectrum in standard perturbation theory to investigate non-Gaussianity in the reconstructed matter density field. We show that the amplitude of the bispectrum significantly decreases for small $k$ after reconstruction and that the tree-level bispectrum agrees well with N-body results in the weakly nonlinear regime.
  • Einstein's theory of General Relativity implies that energy, i.e. matter, curves space-time and thus deforms lightlike geodesics, giving rise to gravitational lensing. This phenomenon is well understood in the case of the Schwarzschild metric, and has been accurately described in the past; however, lensing in the Kerr space-time has received less attention in the literature despite potential practical observational applications. In particular, lensing in such space is not expressible as the gradient of a scalar potential and as such is a source of curl-like signatures and an asymmetric shear pattern. In this paper, we develop a differentiable lensing map in the Kerr metric, reworking and extending previous approaches. By using standard tools of weak gravitational lensing, we isolate and quantify the distortion that is uniquely induced by the presence of angular momentum in the metric. We apply this framework to the distortion induced by a Kerr-like foreground object on a distribution of background of sources. We verify that the new unique lensing signature is orders of magnitude below current observational bounds for a range of lens configurations.
  • In this paper, we present a method for computing the marginal likelihood, also known as the model likelihood or Bayesian evidence, from Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), or other sampled posterior distributions. In order to do this, one needs to be able to estimate the density of points in parameter space, and this can be challenging in high numbers of dimensions. Here we present a Bayesian analysis, where we obtain the posterior for the marginal likelihood, using $k$th nearest-neighbour distances in parameter space, using the Mahalanobis distance metric, under the assumption that the points in the chain (thinned if required) are independent. We generalise the algorithm to apply to importance-sampled chains, where each point is assigned a weight. We illustrate this with an idealised posterior of known form with an analytic marginal likelihood, and show that for chains of length $\sim 10^5$ points, the technique is effective for parameter spaces with up to $\sim 20$ dimensions. We also argue that $k=1$ is the optimal choice, and discuss failure modes for the algorithm. In a companion paper (Heavens et al. 2017) we apply the technique to the main MCMC chains from the 2015 Planck analysis of cosmic background radiation data, to infer that quantitatively the simplest 6-parameter flat $\Lambda$CDM standard model of cosmology is preferred over all extensions considered.
  • Fisher matrices play an important role in experimental design and in data analysis. Their primary role is to make predictions for the inference of model parameters - both their errors and covariances. In this short review, I outline a number of extensions to the simple Fisher matrix formalism, covering a number of recent developments in the field. These are: (a) situations where the data (in the form of (x,y) pairs) have errors in both x and y; (b) modifications to parameter inference in the presence of systematic errors, or through fixing the values of some model parameters; (c) Derivative Approximation for LIkelihoods (DALI) - higher-order expansions of the likelihood surface, going beyond the Gaussian shape approximation; (d) extensions of the Fisher-like formalism, to treat model selection problems with Bayesian evidence.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We present an optimized variant of the halo model, designed to produce accurate matter power spectra well into the non-linear regime for a wide range of cosmological models. To do this, we introduce physically motivated free parameters into the halo-model formalism and fit these to data from high-resolution $N$-body simulations. For a variety of $\Lambda$CDM and $w$CDM models the halo-model power is accurate to $\simeq 5$ per cent for $k\leq 10h\,\mathrm{Mpc}$ and $z\leq 2$. An advantage of our new halo model is that it can be adapted to account for the effects of baryonic feedback on the power spectrum. We demonstrate this by fitting the halo model to power spectra from the OWLS hydrodynamical simulation suite via parameters that govern halo internal structure. We are able to fit all feedback models investigated at the 5 per cent level using only two free parameters, and we place limits on the range of these halo parameters for feedback models investigated by the OWLS simulations. Accurate predictions to high-$k$ are vital for weak lensing surveys, and these halo parameters could be considered nuisance parameters to marginalize over in future analyses to mitigate uncertainty regarding the details of feedback. Finally, we investigate how lensing observables predicted by our model compare to those from simulations and from HALOFIT for a range of $k$-cuts and feedback models and quantify the angular scales at which these effects become important. Code to calculate power spectra from the model presented in this paper can be found at https://github.com/alexander-mead/hmcode
  • Despite its continued observational successes, there is a persistent (and growing) interest in extending cosmology beyond the standard model, $\Lambda$CDM. This is motivated by a range of apparently serious theoretical issues, involving such questions as the cosmological constant problem, the particle nature of dark matter, the validity of general relativity on large scales, the existence of anomalies in the CMB and on small scales, and the predictivity and testability of the inflationary paradigm. In this paper, we summarize the current status of $\Lambda$CDM as a physical theory, and review investigations into possible alternatives along a number of different lines, with a particular focus on highlighting the most promising directions. While the fundamental problems are proving reluctant to yield, the study of alternative cosmologies has led to considerable progress, with much more to come if hopes about forthcoming high-precision observations and new theoretical ideas are fulfilled.
  • To accomplish correct Bayesian inference from weak lensing shear data requires a complete statistical description of the data. The natural framework to do this is a Bayesian Hierarchical Model, which divides the chain of reasoning into component steps. Starting with a catalogue of shear estimates in tomographic bins, we build a model that allows us to sample simultaneously from the the underlying tomographic shear fields and the relevant power spectra (E-mode, B-mode, and E-B, for auto- and cross-power spectra). The procedure deals easily with masked data and intrinsic alignments. Using Gibbs sampling and messenger fields, we show with simulated data that the large (over 67000-)dimensional parameter space can be efficiently sampled and the full joint posterior probability density function for the parameters can feasibly be obtained. The method correctly recovers the underlying shear fields and all of the power spectra, including at levels well below the shot noise.
  • We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modelling approach for cosmic shear power spectrum inference, jointly sampling from the posterior distribution of the cosmic shear field and its (tomographic) power spectra. Inference of the shear power spectrum is a powerful intermediate product for a cosmic shear analysis, since it requires very few model assumptions and can be used to perform inference on a wide range of cosmological models \emph{a posteriori} without loss of information. We show that joint posterior for the shear map and power spectrum can be sampled effectively by Gibbs sampling, iteratively drawing samples from the map and power spectrum, each conditional on the other. This approach neatly circumvents difficulties associated with complicated survey geometry and masks that plague frequentist power spectrum estimators, since the power spectrum inference provides prior information about the field in masked regions at every sampling step. We demonstrate this approach for inference of tomographic shear $E$-mode, $B$-mode and $EB$-cross power spectra from a simulated galaxy shear catalogue with a number of important features; galaxies distributed on the sky and in redshift with photometric redshift uncertainties, realistic random ellipticity noise for every galaxy and a complicated survey mask. The obtained posterior distributions for the tomographic power spectrum coefficients recover the underlying simulated power spectra for both $E$- and $B$-modes.
  • We present the first cosmological measurement derived from a galaxy density field subject to a `clipping' transformation. By enforcing an upper bound on the galaxy number density field in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey (GAMA), contributions from the nonlinear processes of virialisation and galaxy bias are greatly reduced. This leads to a galaxy power spectrum which is easier to model, without calibration from numerical simulations. We develop a theoretical model for the power spectrum of a clipped field in redshift space, which is exact for the case of anisotropic Gaussian fields. Clipping is found to extend the applicability of the conventional Kaiser prescription by more than a factor of three in wavenumber, or a factor of thirty in terms of the number of Fourier modes. By modelling the galaxy power spectrum on scales k < 0.3 h/Mpc and density fluctuations $\delta_g < 4$ we measure the normalised growth rate $f\sigma_8(z = 0.18) = 0.29 \pm 0.10$.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Weak lensing can be observed through a number of effects on the images of distant galaxies; their shapes are sheared, their sizes and fluxes (magnitudes) are magnified and their positions on the sky are modified by the lensing field. Galaxy shapes probe the shear field whilst size, magnitude and number density probe the convergence field. Both contain cosmological information. In this paper we are concerned with the magnification of the size and magnitude of individual galaxies as a probe of cosmic convergence. We develop a Bayesian approach for inferring the convergence field from a measured size, magnitude and redshift and demonstrate that the inference on convergence requires detailed knowledge of the joint distribution of intrinsic sizes and magnitudes. We build a simple parameterised model for the size-magnitude distribution and estimate this distribution for CFHTLenS galaxies. In light of the measured distribution, we show that the typical dispersion on convergence estimation is ~0.8, compared to ~0.38 for shear. We discuss the possibility of physical systematics for magnification (similar to intrinsic alignments for shear) and compute the expected gains in the Dark Energy Figure-of-Merit (FoM) from combining magnification with shear for different scenarios regarding systematics: when accounting for intrinsic alignments but no systematics on the magnification signal, including magnification could improve the FoM by upto a factor of ~2.5, whilst when accounting for physical systematics in both shear and magnification we anticipate a gain between ~25% and ~65%. In addition to the statistical gains, the fact that cosmic shear and magnification are subject to different systematics makes magnification an attractive complement to any cosmic shear analysis.
  • We measure the length of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature, and the expansion rate of the recent Universe, from low-redshift data only, almost model-independently. We make only the following minimal assumptions: homogeneity and isotropy; a metric theory of gravity; a smooth expansion history, and the existence of standard candles (supernov\ae) and a standard BAO ruler. The rest is determined by the data, which are compilations of recent BAO and Type IA supernova results. Making only these assumptions, we find for the first time that the standard ruler has length $103.9 \pm 2.3\, h^{-1}$ Mpc. The value is a measurement, in contrast to the model-dependent theoretical prediction determined with model parameters set by Planck data ($99.3 \pm 2.1 \, h^{-1}$ Mpc). The latter assumes $\Lambda$CDM, and that the ruler is the sound horizon at radiation drag. Adding passive galaxies as standard clocks or a local Hubble constant measurement allows the absolute BAO scale to be determined ($142.8\pm 3.7$ Mpc), and in the former case the additional information makes the BAO length determination more precise ($101.9\pm 1.9 \, h^{-1}\,$Mpc). The inverse curvature radius of the Universe is weakly constrained and consistent with zero, independently of the gravity model, provided it is metric. We find the effective number of relativistic species to be $N_{\rm eff} = 3.53\pm 0.32$, independent of late-time dark energy or gravity physics.
  • We give an analytical form for the weighted correlation function of peaks in a Gaussian random field. In a cosmological context, this approach strictly describes the formation bias and is the main result here. Nevertheless, we show its validity and applicability to the evolved cosmological density field and halo field, using Gaussian random field realisations and dark matter N-body numerical simulations. Using this result from peak theory we compute the bias of peaks (and dark matter halos) and show that it reproduces results from the simulations at the ${\mathcal O}(10\%)$ level. Our analytical formula for the bias predicts a scale-dependent bias with two characteristics: a broad band shape which, however, is most affected by the choice of weighting scheme and evolution bias, and a more robust, narrow feature localised at the BAO scale, an effect that is confirmed in simulations. This scale-dependent bias smooths the BAO feature but, conveniently, does not move it. We provide a simple analytic formula to describe this effect. We envision that our analytic solution will be of use for galaxy surveys that exploit galaxy clustering.
  • Weak lensing alters the size of images with a similar magnitude to the distortion due to shear. Galaxy size probes the convergence field, and shape the shear field, both of which contain cosmological information. We show the gains expected in the Dark Energy Figure of Merit if galaxy size information is used in combination with galaxy shape. In any normal analysis of cosmic shear, galaxy sizes are also studied, so this is extra statistical information comes for free and is currently unused. There are two main results in this letter: firstly, we show that size measurement can be made uncorrelated with ellipticity measurement, thus allowing the full statistical gain from the combination, provided that $\sqrt{Area}$ is used as a size indicator; secondly, as a proof of concept, we show that when the relevant modes are noise-dominated, as is the norm for lensing surveys, the gains are substantial, with improvements of about 68% in the Figure of Merit expected when systematic errors are ignored. An approximate treatment of such systematics such as intrinsic alignments and size-magnitude correlations respectively suggests that a much better improvement in the Dark Energy Figure of Merit of even a factor of ~4 may be achieved.
  • In this paper, we motivate the use of galaxy clustering measurements using photometric redshift information, including a contribution from flux magnification, as a probe of cosmology. We present cosmological forecasts when clustering data alone is used, and when clustering is combined with a cosmic shear analysis. We consider two types of clustering analysis: firstly, clustering with only redshift auto-correlations in tomographic redshift bins; secondly, using all available redshift bin correlations. Finally, we consider how inferred cosmological parameters may be biased using each analysis when flux magnification is neglected. Results are presented for a Stage III ground-based survey, and a Stage IV space-based survey modelled with photometric redshift errors, and values for the slope of the luminosity function inferred from CFHTLenS catalogues. We find that combining clustering information with shear can improve constraints on cosmological parameters, giving an improvement to a Dark Energy Task Force-like figure of merit by a factor of 1.33 when only auto-correlations in redshift are used for the clustering analysis, rising to 1.52 when cross-correlations in redshift are also included. The addition of galaxy-galaxy lensing gives further improvement, with increases in figure of merit by a factor of 2.82 and 3.7 for each type of clustering analysis respectively. The presence of flux magnification in a clustering analysis does not significantly affect the precision of cosmological constraints when combined with cosmic shear and galaxy-galaxy lensing. However if magnification is neglected, inferred cosmological parameter values are biased, with biases in some cosmological parameters larger than statistical errors. (Abridged)
  • We generalize the concept of the ordinary skew-spectrum to probe the effect of non-Gaussianity on the morphology of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps in several domains: in real-space (where they are commonly known as cumulant-correlators), and in harmonic and needlet bases. The essential aim is to retain more information than normally contained in these statistics, in order to assist in determining the source of any measured non-Gaussianity, in the same spirit as Munshi & Heavens (2010) skew-spectra were used to identify foreground contaminants to the CMB bispectrum in Planck data. Using a perturbative series to construct the Minkowski Functionals (MFs), we provide a pseudo-Cl based approach in both harmonic and needlet representations to estimate these spectra in the presence of a mask and inhomogeneous noise. Assuming homogeneous noise we present approx- imate expressions for error covariance for the purpose of joint estimation of these spectra. We present specific results for four different models of primordial non-Gaussianity local, equilateral, orthogonal and enfolded models, as well as non-Gaussianity caused by unsubtracted point sources. Closed form results of next-order corrections to MFs too are obtained in terms of a quadruplet of kurt-spectra. We also use the method of modal decomposition of the bispectrum and trispectrum to reconstruct the MFs as an alternative method of reconstruction of morphological properties of CMB maps. Finally, we introduce the odd-parity skew-spectra to probe the odd-parity bispectrum and its impact on the morphology of the CMB sky. Although developed for the CMB, the generic results obtained here can be useful in other areas of cosmology.
  • We present a finely-binned tomographic weak lensing analysis of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, CFHTLenS, mitigating contamination to the signal from the presence of intrinsic galaxy alignments via the simultaneous fit of a cosmological model and an intrinsic alignment model. CFHTLenS spans 154 square degrees in five optical bands, with accurate shear and photometric redshifts for a galaxy sample with a median redshift of zm =0.70. We estimate the 21 sets of cosmic shear correlation functions associated with six redshift bins, each spanning the angular range of 1.5<theta<35 arcmin. We combine this CFHTLenS data with auxiliary cosmological probes: the cosmic microwave background with data from WMAP7, baryon acoustic oscillations with data from BOSS, and a prior on the Hubble constant from the HST distance ladder. This leads to constraints on the normalisation of the matter power spectrum sigma_8 = 0.799 +/- 0.015 and the matter density parameter Omega_m = 0.271 +/- 0.010 for a flat Lambda CDM cosmology. For a flat wCDM cosmology we constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w = -1.02 +/- 0.09. We also provide constraints for curved Lambda CDM and wCDM cosmologies. We find the intrinsic alignment contamination to be galaxy-type dependent with a significant intrinsic alignment signal found for early-type galaxies, in contrast to the late-type galaxy sample for which the intrinsic alignment signal is found to be consistent with zero.
  • Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past lightcone, while observations take place on the lightcone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume 0.04Gpc3. Using the SFH in a time period which samples the history of the Universe between look-back times 11.5 to 13.4 Gyrs as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.
  • Secondary contributions to the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), such as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (tSZ), and the effect of gravitational lensing, have distinctive non-Gaussian signatures, and full descriptions therefore require information beyond that contained in their power spectra. In this paper we use the recently introduced skew-spectra associated with the Minkowski Functionals (MF) to probe the topology of CMB maps to probe the secondary non-Gaussianity as a function of beam-smoothing in order to separate various contributions. We devise estimators for these spectra in the presence of a realistic observational masks and present expressions for their covariance as a function of instrumental noise. Specific results are derived for the mixed ISW-lensing and tSZ-lensing bispectra as well as contamination due to point sources for noise levels that correspond to the Planck (143 GHz channel) and EPIC (150 GHz channel) experiments. The cumulative signal to noise ration $S/N$ for one-point generalized skewness-parameters can reach an order of ${\cal O}(10)$ for Planck and two orders of magnitude higher for EPIC, i.e. ${\cal O}(10^3)$. We also find that these three spectra skew-spectra are correlated, having correlation coefficients $r \sim 0.5-1.0$; higher $l$ modes are more strongly correlated. Though the values of $S/N$ increase with decreasing noise, the triplets of skew-spectra that determine the MFs bcome more correlated; the $S/N$ ratios of lensing-induced skew-spectra are smaller compared to that of a frequency-cleaned tSZ map.
  • We present a method for attaining sub-arcsecond pointing stability during sub- orbital balloon flights, as designed for in the High Altitude Lensing Observatory (HALO) concept. The pointing method presented here has the potential to perform near-space quality optical astronomical imaging at 1-2% of the cost of space-based missions. We also discuss an architecture that can achieve sufficient thermomechanical stability to match the pointing stability. This concept is motivated by advances in the development and testing of Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights which promise to allow observation campaigns lasting more than three months. The design incorporates a multi-stage pointing architecture comprising: a gondola coarse azimuth control system, a multi-axis nested gimbal frame structure with arcsecond stability, a telescope de-rotator to eliminate field rotation, and a fine guidance stage consisting of both a telescope mounted angular rate sensor and guide CCDs in the focal plane to drive a fast-steering mirror. We discuss the results of pointing tests together with a preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis required for sub-arcsecond pointing at high altitude. Possible future applications in the areas of wide-field surveys and exoplanet searches are also discussed.
  • GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2010 (GREAT10) is a public image analysis challenge aimed at the development of algorithms to analyze astronomical images. Specifically, the challenge is to measure varying image distortions in the presence of a variable convolution kernel, pixelization and noise. This is the second in a series of challenges set to the astronomy, computer science and statistics communities, providing a structured environment in which methods can be improved and tested in preparation for planned astronomical surveys. GREAT10 extends upon previous work by introducing variable fields into the challenge. The "Galaxy Challenge" involves the precise measurement of galaxy shape distortions, quantified locally by two parameters called shear, in the presence of a known convolution kernel. Crucially, the convolution kernel and the simulated gravitational lensing shape distortion both now vary as a function of position within the images, as is the case for real data. In addition, we introduce the "Star Challenge" that concerns the reconstruction of a variable convolution kernel, similar to that in a typical astronomical observation. This document details the GREAT10 Challenge for potential participants. Continually updated information is also available from http://www.greatchallenges.info.
  • In these lectures I give an overview of gravitational lensing, concentrating on theoretical aspects, including derivations of some of the important results. Topics covered include the determination of surface mass densities of intervening lenses, as well as the statistical analysis of distortions of galaxy images by general inhomogeneities (cosmic shear), both in 2D projection on the sky, and in 3D where source distance information is available. 3D mass reconstruction and the shear ratio test are also considered, and the sensitivity of observables to Dark Energy is used to show how its equation of state may be determined using weak lensing. Finally, the article considers the prospect of testing Einstein's General Relativity with weak lensing, exploiting the differences in growth rates of perturbations in different models.} \abstract{In these lectures I give an overview of gravitational lensing, concentrating on theoretical aspects, including derivations of some of the important results. Topics covered include the determination of surface mass densities of intervening lenses, as well as the statistical analysis of distortions of galaxy images by general inhomogeneities (cosmic shear), both in 2D projection on the sky, and in 3D where source distance information is available. 3D mass reconstruction and the shear ratio test are also considered, and the sensitivity of observables to Dark Energy is used to show how its equation of state may be determined using weak lensing. Finally, the article considers the prospect of testing Einstein's General Relativity with weak lensing, exploiting the differences in growth rates of perturbations in different models.