• Planetary Nebulae (PN) emit enormous amount of energy in several emission lines. Measuring the line-flux for PNe in a given stellar population, the Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function (PNLF) can be compiled. Surveys of PNe revealed that the faint-end of the PNLF can be approximated by a simple exponential dependency expected for an expanding spherical shell. However at the bright-end there exists a steep cut-off which was unexpected and remains unexplained. Interestingly, the cut-off value appears to be nearly the same for different stellar populations as young spiral galaxies and old elliptical galaxies and, despite the lack of understanding, became an extragalactic distance estimator. Here we show that the recently computed post-AGB evolutionary tracks are capable to explain the decades old mystery. All new models with ages between 1 and 7 Gyr (progenitor masses between 2.0 and 1.1 of solar mass) evolve fast enough to ionize the PN, and at similar post-AGB luminosity which allows the [O III] 500.7nm line to reach nearly the same magnitude. The new models predict that the Sun at the end of its life will form a rather faint PN.
  • We present the results of targeted observations and a survey of 1612-, 1665-, and 1667-MHz circumstellar OH maser emission from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), using the Parkes and Australia Telescope Compact Array radio telescopes. No clear OH maser emission has been detected in any of our observations targeting luminous, long-period, large-amplitude variable stars, which have been confirmed spectroscopically and photometrically to be mid- to late-M spectral type. These observations have probed 3 - 4 times deeper than any OH maser survey in the SMC. Using a bootstrapping method with LMC and Galactic OH/IR star samples and our SMC observation upper limits, we have calculated the likelihood of not detecting maser emission in any of the two sources considered to be the top maser candidates to be less than 0.05%, assuming a similar pumping mechanism as the LMC and Galactic OH/IR sources. We have performed a population comparison of the Magellanic Clouds and used Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry to confirm that we have observed all high luminosity SMC sources that are expected to exhibit maser emission. We suspect that, compared to the OH/IR stars in the Galaxy and LMC, the reduction in metallicity may curtail the dusty wind phase at the end of the evolution of the most massive cool stars. We also suspect that the conditions in the circumstellar envelope change beyond a simple scaling of abundances and wind speed with metallicity.
  • We perform a comprehensive analysis of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC6781 to investigate the physical conditions of each of its ionized, atomic, and molecular gas and dust components and the object's evolution, based on panchromatic observational data ranging from UV to radio. Empirical nebular elemental abundances, compared with theoretical predictions via nucleosynthesis models of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, indicate that the progenitor is a solar-metallicity, 2.25-3.0 Msun initial-mass star. We derive the best-fit distance of 0.46 kpc by fitting the stellar luminosity (as a function of the distance and effective temperature of the central star) with the adopted post-AGB evolutionary tracks. Our excitation energy diagram analysis indicate high excitation temperatures in the photodissociation region (PDR) beyond the ionized part of the nebula, suggesting extra heating by shock interactions between the slow AGB wind and the fast PN wind. Through iterative fitting using the Cloudy code with empirically-derived constraints, we find the best-fit dusty photoionization model of the object that would inclusively reproduce all of the adopted panchromatic observational data. The estimated total gas mass (0.41 Msun) corresponds to the mass ejected during the last AGB thermal pulse event predicted for a 2.5 Msun initial-mass star. A significant fraction of the total mass (about 70 percent) is found to exist in the PDR, demonstrating the critical importance of the PDR in PNe that are generally recognized as the hallmark of ionized/H+ regions.
  • Iron suffers from high levels of depletion in the highly ionized environments of planetary nebulae, making the direct determination of undepleted elemental iron abundances difficult. Zinc, which does not suffer from the same depletion effects as iron, may be used as a surrogate element to measure iron abundances as there is an approximately constant zinc-to-iron ratio across a wide range of metallicities. In this paper, we report zinc abundances of six Galactic Bulge planetary nebulae determined from new observations taken with ISAAC on the Very Large Telescope, Chile, prior to the instrument's decommissioning as well as a further three based upon literature observations. UVES data of the sample planetary nebulae are presented and have been used to derive abundances, temperatures and densities of a variety of elements and ions. The abundances derived from the UVES data agree well with results from the literature. [Zn/H], determined from the ISAAC observations, is found to be generally sub-solar and [O/Zn] is found to be either consistent or enriched with respect to Solar.
  • Effective temperatures and luminosities are calculated for 1,475,921 Tycho-2 and 107,145 Hipparcos stars, based on distances from Gaia Data Release 1. Parameters are derived by comparing multi-wavelength archival photometry to BT-Settl model atmospheres. The 1-sigma uncertainties for the Tycho-2 and Hipparcos stars are +/-137 K and +/-125 K in temperature and +/-35 per cent and +/-19 per cent in luminosity. The luminosity uncertainty is dominated by that of the Gaia parallax. Evidence for infrared excess between 4.6 and 25 microns is found for 4256 stars, of which 1883 are strong candidates. These include asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, Cepheids, Herbig Ae/Be stars, young stellar objects, and other sources. We briefly demonstrate the capabilities of this dataset by exploring local interstellar extinction, the onset of dust production in AGB stars, the age and metallicity gradients of the solar neighbourhood and structure within the Gould Belt. We close by discussing the potential impact of future Gaia data releases.
  • We have traced the spatial distributions of intermediate-age and old stars in nine dwarf galaxies in the distant parts of the Local Group, using multi-epoch 3.6 and 4.5 micron data from the DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer (DUSTiNGS) survey. Using complementary optical imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, we identify the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) in the 3.6 micron photometry, separating thermally-pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars from the larger red giant branch (RGB) populations. Unlike the constant TRGB in the I-band, at 3.6 micron the TRGB magnitude varies by ~0.7 mag, making it unreliable as a distance indicator. The intermediate-age and old stars are well mixed in two-thirds of the sample with no evidence of a gradient in the ratio of the intermediate-age to old stellar populations outside the central ~1-2'. Variable AGB stars are detected in the outer extremities of the galaxies, indicating that chemical enrichment from these dust-producing stars may occur in the outer regions of galaxies with some frequency. Theories of structure formation in dwarf galaxies must account for the lack of radial gradients in intermediate-age populations and the presence of these stars in the outer extremities of dwarfs. Finally, we identify unique features in individual galaxies, such as extended tidal features in Sex A and Sag DIG and a central concentration of AGB stars in the inner regions of NGC 185 and NGC 147.
  • We present the results of our survey of 1612 MHz circumstellar OH maser emission from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and red supergiants (RSGs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We have discovered four new circumstellar maser sources in the LMC, and increased the number of reliable wind speeds from IR stars in the LMC from 5 to 13. Using our new wind speeds, as well as those from Galactic sources, we have derived an updated relation for dust driven winds: $v_{exp} \propto Z L^{0.4}$. We compare the sub-solar metallicity LMC OH/IR stars with carefully selected samples of more metal-rich OH/IR stars, also at known distances, in the Galactic Centre and Galactic Bulge. For 8 of the Bulge stars we derive pulsation periods for the first time, using near-IR photometry from the VVV survey. We have modeled our LMC OH/IR stars and developed an empirical method of deriving gas-to-dust ratios and mass loss rates by scaling the models to the results from maser profiles. We have done this also for samples in the Galactic Centre and Bulge and derived a new mass loss prescription that includes luminosity, pulsation period, and gas-to-dust ratio $\dot{M} = 1.06^{+3.5}_{-0.8} \rm{ \cdot }10^{-5}\,(L/10^4\,\rm{L}_\odot)^{0.9\pm0.1}(P/500\,\rm{d})^{0.75\pm0.3} (r_{gd}/200)^{-0.03\pm0.07}\,\rm{M_{\odot}}\, yr^{-1}$. The tightest correlation is found between mass loss rate and luminosity. We find that the gas-to-dust ratio has little effect on the mass loss of oxygen-rich AGB stars and RSGs within the Galaxy and the LMC. This suggests that mass loss of oxygen-rich AGB stars and RSGs is (nearly) independent of metallicity between a half and twice solar.
  • This paper presents a summary of four invited and twelve contributed presentations on asymptotic giant branch stars and red supergiants, given over the course of two afternoon splinter sessions at the 19th Cool Stars Workshop. It highlights both recent observations and recent theory, with some emphasis on high spatial resolution, over a wide range of wavelengths. Topics covered include 3D models, convection, binary interactions, mass loss, dust formation and magnetic fields.
  • ALMA observations show a non-detection of carbon monoxide around the four most luminous asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Stellar evolution models and star counts show that the mass-loss rates from these stars should be ~1.2-3.5 x 10^-7 solar masses per year. We would naively expect such stars to be detectable at this distance (4.5 kpc). By modelling the ultraviolet radiation field from post-AGB stars and white dwarfs in 47 Tuc, we conclude CO should be dissociated abnormally close to the stars. We estimate that the CO envelopes will be truncated at a few hundred stellar radii from their host stars and that the line intensities are about two orders of magnitude below our current detection limits. The truncation of CO envelopes should be important for AGB stars in dense clusters. Observing the CO (3-2) and higher transitions and targeting stars far from the centres of clusters should result in the detections needed to measure the outflow velocities from these stars.
  • A millimeter molecular line survey of three carbon-rich AGB stars and two oxygen-rich planetary nebulae has been carried out over the frequency range 80.5-115.5 GHz. Sixty eight different transitions were detected in the data from 27 different molecular species. The hyperfine structure of C2H and C13CH has been fitted to constrain the optical depth of their transitions. All other transitions have been constrained on the basis of their line profile shapes. Rotation temperatures and column densities have been calculated for all possible species, with adaptations to the methods applied in order to account for the hyperfine structure of various transitions. From the column densities, carbon, silicon and sulphur isotopic ratios have been determined. The results corroborate IRAS 15194-5115 as a J-type star, whilst excluding IRAS 15082-4808 and IRAS 07454-7112 as such.
  • We report the discovery of the closest collisional ring galaxy to the Milky Way. Such rare systems occur due to "bulls-eye" encounters between two reasonably matched galaxies. The recessional velocity of about 840 km/s is low enough that it was detected in the AAO/UKST Survey for Galactic H$\alpha$ emission. The distance is only 10.0 Mpc and the main galaxy shows a full ring of star forming knots, 6.1 kpc in diameter surrounding a quiescent disk. The smaller assumed "bullet" galaxy also shows vigorous star formation. The spectacular nature of the object had been overlooked because of its location in the Galactic plane and proximity to a bright star and even though it is the 60$^{\rm th}$ brightest galaxy in the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) HI survey. The overall system has a physical size of $\sim$15 kpc, a total mass of $M_\ast = 6.6\times 10^9$ M$_\odot$ (stars + HI), a metallicity of [O/H]$\sim-0.4$, and a star formation rate of 0.2-0.5 M$_\odot$\,yr$^{-1}$, making it a Magellanic-type system. Collisional ring galaxies therefore extend to much lower galaxy masses than commonly assumed. We derive a space density for such systems of $7 \times 10^{-5}\,\rm Mpc^{-3}$, an order of magnitude higher than previously estimated. This suggests Kathryn's Wheel is the nearest such system. We present discovery images, CTIO 4-m telescope narrow-band follow-up images and spectroscopy for selected emission components. Given its proximity and modest extinction along the line of sight, this spectacular system provides an ideal target for future high spatial resolution studies of such systems and for direct detection of its stellar populations.
  • The SKA will be a state of the art radiotelescope optimized for both large area surveys as well as for deep pointed observations. In this paper we analyze the impact that the SKA will have on Galactic studies, starting from the immense legacy value of the all-sky survey proposed by the continuum SWG but also presenting some areas of Galactic Science that particularly benefit from SKA observations both surveys and pointed. The planned all-sky survey will be characterized by unique spatial resolution, sensitivity and survey speed, providing us with a wide-field atlas of the Galactic continuum emission. Synergies with existing, current and planned radio Galactic Plane surveys will be discussed. SKA will give the opportunity to create a sensitive catalog of discrete Galactic radio sources, most of them representing the interaction of stars at various stages of their evolution with the environment: complete census of all stage of HII regions evolution; complete census of late stages of stellar evolution such as PNe and SNRs; detection of stellar winds, thermal jets, Symbiotic systems, Chemically Peculiar and dMe stars, active binary systems in both flaring and quiescent states. Coherent emission events like Cyclotron Maser in the magnetospheres of different classes of stars can be detected. Pointed, deep observations will allow new insights into the physics of the coronae and plasma processes in active stellar systems and single stars, enabling the detection of flaring activity in larger stellar population for a better comprehension of the mechanism of energy release in the atmospheres of stars with different masses and age.
  • A recent analysis comparing the [Na/Fe] distributions of red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6752 found that the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars changes from 30:70 on the RGB to 100:0 on the AGB. The surprising paucity of Na-rich stars on the AGB in NGC 6752 warrants additional investigations to determine if the failure of a significant fraction of stars to ascend the AGB is an attribute common to all globular clusters. Therefore, we present radial velocities, [Fe/H], and [Na/Fe] abundances for 35 AGB stars in the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae (47 Tuc; NGC 104), and compare the AGB [Na/Fe] distribution with a similar RGB sample published previously. The abundances and velocities were derived from high resolution spectra obtained with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS) and MSpec spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay 6.5m telescope. We find the average heliocentric radial velocity and [Fe/H] values to be <RV_helio.>=-18.56 km s^-1 (sigma=10.21 km s^-1) and <[Fe/H]>=-0.68 (sigma=0.08), respectively, in agreement with previous literature estimates. The average [Na/Fe] abundance is 0.12 dex lower in the 47 Tuc AGB sample compared to the RGB sample, and the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars is 63:37 on the AGB and 45:55 on the RGB. However, in contrast to NGC 6752, the two 47 Tuc populations have nearly identical [Na/Fe] dispersion and interquartile range values. The data presented here suggest that only a small fraction <20% of Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc may fail to ascend the AGB. Regardless of the cause for the lower average [Na/Fe] abundance in AGB stars, we find that Na-poor stars and at least some Na-rich stars in 47 Tuc evolve through the early AGB phase. [abridged]
  • The evolution of central stars of planetary nebulae was so far documented in just a few cases. However, spectra collected a few decades ago may provide a good reference for studying the evolution of central stars using the emission line fluxes of their nebulae. We investigated evolutionary changes of the [OIII] 5007 A line flux in the spectra of planetary nebulae. We compared nebular fluxes collected during a decade or longer. We used literature data and newly obtained spectra. A grid of Cloudy models was computed using existing evolutionary models, and the models were compared with the observations. An increase of the [OIII] 5007 A line flux is frequently observed in young planetary nebulae hosting H-rich central stars. The increasing nebular excitation is the response to the increasing temperature and hardening radiation of the central stars. We did not observe any changes in the nebular fluxes in the planetary nebulae hosting late-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) central stars. This may indicate a slower temperature evolution (which may stem from a different evolutionary status) of late-[WR] stars. In young planetary nebulae with H-rich central stars, the evolution can be followed using optical spectra collected during a decade or longer. The observed evolution of H-rich central stars is consistent with the predictions of the evolutionary models provided in the literature. Late-[WR] stars possibly follow a different evolutionary path.
  • Zinc is a useful surrogate element for measuring Fe/H as, unlike iron, it is not depleted in the gas phase media. Zn/H and O/Zn ratios have been derived using the [Zn IV] emission line at 3.625um for a sample of nine Galactic planetary nebulae, seven of which are based upon new observations using the VLT. Based on photoionization models, O/O++ is the most reliable ionisation correction factor for zinc that can readily be determined from optical emission lines, with an estimated accuracy of 10% or better for all targets in our sample. The majority of the sample is found to be sub-solar in [Zn/H]. [O/Zn] in half of the sample is found to be consistent with Solar within uncertainties, whereas the remaining half are enhanced in [O/Zn]. [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] as functions of Galactocentric distance have been investigated and there is little evidence to support a trend in either case.
  • The Luminous Infrared Galaxy NGC1614 hosts a prominent circumnuclear ring of star formation. However, the nature of the dominant emitting mechanism in its central ~100 pc is still under debate. We present sub-arcsecond angular resolution radio, mid-infrared, Pa-alpha, optical, and X-ray observations of NGC1614, aimed at studying in detail both the circumnuclear ring and the nuclear region. The 8.4 GHz continuum emission traced by the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Gemini/T-ReCS 8.7 micron emission, as well as the Pa-alpha line emission, show remarkable morphological similarities within the star-forming ring, suggesting that the underlying emission mechanisms are tightly related. We used an HST/NICMOS Pa-alpha map of similar resolution to our radio maps to disentangle the thermal free-free and non-thermal synchrotron radio emission, from which we obtained the intrinsic synchrotron power-law for each individual region within the central kpc of NGC1614. The radio ring surrounds a relatively faint, steep-spectrum source at the very center of the galaxy, suggesting that the central source is not powered by an AGN, but rather by a compact (r < 90 pc) starburst. Chandra X-ray data also show that the central kpc region is dominated by starburst activity, without requiring the existence of an AGN. We also used publicly available infrared data to model-fit the spectral energy distribution of both the starburst ring and a putative AGN in NGC1614. In summary, we conclude that there is no need to invoke an AGN to explain the observed bolometric properties of the galaxy.
  • Variability is examined in over 2.6 million stars covering 11 square degrees of the core of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph) from VISTA Z-band observations. Generally, pulsation on the Sgr dSph giant branches appears to be excited by the internal kappa mechanism. Pulsation amplitudes appear identical between red and asymptotic (RGB/AGB) giant stars, and between unreddened carbon and oxygen-rich stars at the same luminosity. The lack of correlation between infrared excess and variability among oxygen-rich stars indicates pulsations do not contribute significantly to wind driving in oxygen-rich stars in the Sgr dSph, though the low amplitudes of these stars mean this may not apply elsewhere. The dust-enshrouded carbon stars have the highest amplitudes of the stars we observe. Only in these stars does an external kappa-mechanism-driven pulsation seem likely, caused by variations in their more-opaque carbon-rich molecules or dust. This may allow pulsation driving of winds to be effective in carbon stars. Variability can be simplified to a power law (amplitude proportional to L/T^2), as in other systems. In total, we identify 3026 variable stars (with r.m.s. variability of delta Z >~ 0.015 magnitudes), of which 176 are long-period variables associable with the upper giant branches of the Sgr dSph. We also identify 324 candidate RR Lyrae variables in the the Sgr dSph and 340 in the outer Galactic Bulge.
  • 47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and GC formation in massive more metal-rich GCs since is the closest, massive GC. We present chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu in 164 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the massive globular cluster 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4-m telescope and the FLAMES multi-object spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. We find an average [Fe/H]=--0.79$\pm$0.09 dex, consistent with literature values, as well as over-abundances of alpha-elements ($[\alpha/\mbox{Fe}]\sim0.3$ dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r-process dominated ([Eu/La]=+0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anti-correlation, a signature typically seen in Galactic globular clusters, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] $\sim$\,--0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A KS-test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of AGB nucleosynthesis yields.
  • We present the deepest near-infrared (ZJKs) photometry yet obtained of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal (Sgr dSph), using VISTA to survey 11 square degrees centred on its core. We list locations and ZJKs-band magnitudes for over 2.9 million sources in the field. We discuss the isolation of the Sgr dSph from the foreground and Galactic Bulge populations, identify the Sgr dSph's horizontal branch in the near-infrared for the first time, and map the density of the galaxy's stars. We present isochrones for the Sgr dSph and Bulge populations. These are consistent with the previously-reported properties of the Sgr dSph core: namely that it is dominated by a population between [Fe/H] ~ -1 dex and solar, with a significant [alpha/Fe] versus [Fe/H] gradient. While strong contamination from the Galactic Bulge prevents accurate measurement of the (Galactic) north side of the Sgr dSph, the dwarf galaxy can be well-approximated by a roughly ovaloid projection of characteristic size 4 x 2 degrees, beyond which the projected stellar density is less than half that of the region surrounding the core. The galaxy's major axis is perpendicular to the Galactic Plane, as in previous studies. We find slight evidence to confirm a metallicity gradient in the Sgr dSph and use isochrones to fit a distance of 24.3 +/- 2.3 kpc. We were unable to fully constrain the metallicity distribution of the Sgr dSph due to the Bulge contamination and strong correlation of [alpha/Fe] with metallicity, however we find that metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] <~ --1) make up <~29 per cent of the Sgr dSph's upper-RGB population. The Bulge population is best fit by a younger population with [Fe/H] ~ 0 and [alpha/Fe] ~ 0 or slightly higher. We find no evidence for a split, peanut- or X-shaped Bulge population in this line of sight (l = 5.6 +/- ~1 deg, b = -14.1 +/- ~3 deg).
  • We present a determination of the average space density and birth rate of hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs within a radius of 1 kpc around the Sun, based on an observational sample of 360 candidate white dwarfs with g<19.5 and (g-r)<0.4, selected from the UV-excess Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (UVEX), in combination with a theoretical white dwarf population that has been constructed to simulate the observations, including the effects of reddening and observational selection effects. The main uncertainty in the derivation of the white dwarf space density and current birth rate lies in the absolute photometric calibration and the photometric scatter of the observational data, which influences the classification method on colours, the completeness and the pollution. Corrections for these effects are applied. We derive an average space density of hydrogen-line (DA) white dwarfs with T_eff > 10,000K (M_V<12.2) of (3.8 +/- 1.1) x 1e-4 pc^-3, and an average DA white dwarf birth rate over the last 7e7 years of (5.4 + 1.5) x 1e-13 pc^-3 yr^-1. Additionally, we show that many estimates of the white dwarf space density from different studies are consistent with each other, and with our determination here.
  • The asymptotic giant branch (AGB) of the globular cluster NGC 4372 appears to extend to unexpectedly high luminosities. We show, on the basis of proper motions and spatial distribution, that the extended AGB is indeed a likely part of the cluster. We also present the first spectra of the very cool (2600 K), very luminous (8000 Lsun), very dusty, oxygen-rich, purported long-period variable stars V1 and V2 that define the AGB tip. In particular, on the basis of their radial velocities, we conclude that V1 and V2 are probably members. We find that V1 and V2 are likely undergoing the superwind phase that terminates their nuclear-burning evolution. We hypothesise that the mass-loss processes that terminate the AGB are inhibited in NGC 4372 due to a lack of atmospheric pulsation and the high gas-to-dust ratio in the ejecta, leading to a delay in the associated enhanced mass loss and dust production. Previously predicted, but never observed, this explains the high mass of the white dwarf in Pease 1 in M15 without the need to invoke a stellar merger. If commonplace, this phenomenon has implications for the mass return from stars, the production of carbon stars and supernovae through the Universe's history, and the AGB contribution to light from unresolved metal-poor populations.
  • We present spectra of 1142 colour-selected stars in the direction of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal (Sgr dSph) galaxy, of which 1058 were taken with VLT/FLAMES multi-object spectrograph and 84 were taken with the SAAO Radcliffe 1.9-m telescope grating spectrograph. Spectroscopic membership is confirmed (at >99% confidence) for 592 stars on the basis of their radial velocity, and spectral types are given. Very slow rotation is marginally detected around the galaxy's major axis. We identify five S stars and 23 carbon stars, of which all but four carbon stars are newly-determined and all but one (PQ Sgr) are likely Sgr dSph members. We examine the onset of carbon-richness in this metal-poor galaxy in the context of stellar models. We compare the stellar death rate (one star per 1000-1700 years) to known planetary nebula dynamical ages and find that the bulk population produce the observed (carbon-rich) planetary nebulae. We compute average lifetimes of S and carbon stars as 60-250 and 130-500 kyr, compared to a total thermal-pulsing asymptotic giant branch lifetime of 530-1330 kyr. We conclude by discussing the return of carbon-rich material to the ISM.
  • We derive the fundamental parameters (temperature and luminosity) of 107 619 Hipparcos stars and place these stars on a true Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. This is achieved by comparing BT-Settl model atmospheres to spectral energy distributions (SEDs) created from Hipparcos, Tycho, SDSS, DENIS, 2MASS, MSX, AKARI, IRAS and WISE data. We also identify and quantify from these SEDs any infrared excesses attributable to circumstellar matter. We compare our results to known types of objects, focussing on the giant branch stars. Giant star dust production (as traced by infrared excess) is found to start in earnest around 680 Lsun.
  • Intermediate-mass stars end their lives by ejecting the bulk of their envelope via a slow dense wind back into the interstellar medium, to form the next generation of stars and planets. Stellar pulsations are thought to elevate gas to an altitude cool enough for the condensation of dust, which is then accelerated by radiation pressure from starlight, entraining the gas and driving the wind. However accounting for the mass loss has been a problem due to the difficulty in observing tenuous gas and dust tens of milliarcseconds from the star, and there is accordingly no consensus on the way sufficient momentum is transferred from the starlight to the outflow. Here, we present spatially-resolved, multi-wavelength observations of circumstellar dust shells of three stars on the asymptotic giant branch of the HR diagram. When imaged in scattered light, dust shells were found at remarkably small radii (<~ 2 stellar radii) and with unexpectedly large grains (~300 nm radius). This proximity to the photosphere argues for dust species that are transparent to starlight and therefore resistant to sublimation by the intense radiation field. While transparency usually implies insufficient radiative pressure to drive a wind, the radiation field can accelerate these large grains via photon scattering rather than absorption - a plausible mass-loss mechanism for lower-amplitude pulsating stars.
  • It is important to understand the interplay between nuclear star-formation and nuclear activity when studying the evolution of gas rich galaxy mergers. We present here new spatially resolved L-band integral field unit observations of the inner kpc of the luminous IR galaxy NGC 1614. A broad ring of 3.3 um PAH emission is found at a distance of approximately 200 pc from the core. This ring overlaps with a previously established star-forming ring detected with Pa_alpha and radio continuum observations, but peaks outside it, especially if determined using the PAH equivalent width. Using the characteristics of the PAH emission and the ionised gas emission we argue that NGC 1614 features an outward propagating ring of star formation, where the equivalent width of the PAH emission localises the regions where the current star formation is just expanding into the molecular gas outward of the nucleus. The core itself shows a highly luminous, slightly resolved (at ~80 pc) L-band continuum source. We find no evidence of AGN activity and rule out the presence of an obscured AGN using L-band diagnostics. Furthermore, we detect the likely companion galaxy from archival HST/ACS imaging. The star formation and dynamical characteristics of the system are consistent with a relatively major merger just after its second passage. An outstanding question is how a gas-rich advanced merger such as this one, with strong LIRG level nuclear starburst and major merger-like tidal features, has not yet developed an active nucleus.