• Several approaches to cognition and intelligence research rely on statistics-based models testing, namely factor analysis. In the present work we exploit the emerging dynamical systems perspective putting the focus on the role of the network topology underlying the relationships between cognitive processes. We go through a couple of models of distinct cognitive phenomena and yet find the conditions for them to be mathematically equivalent. We find a non-trivial attractor of the system that corresponds to the exact definition of a well-known network centrality and hence stress the interplay between the dynamics and the underlying network connectivity, showing that both of the two are relevant. The connectivity structure between cognitive processes is not known but yet it is not any. Regardless of the network considered, it is always possible to recover a positive manifold of correlations. However, we show that different network topologies lead to different plausible statistical models concerning correlations structure, ranging from one to multiple factors models and richer correlation structures.
  • Synchronization processes are ubiquitous despite the many connectivity patterns that complex systems can show. Usually, the emergence of synchrony is a macroscopic observable, however, the microscopic details of the system, as e.g. the underlying network of interactions, is many times partially or totally unknown. We already know that different interaction structures can give rise to a common functionality, understood as a common macroscopic observable. Building upon this fact, here, we propose network transformations that keep the collective behavior of a large system of Kuramoto oscillators functionally invariant. We derive a method based on information theory principles, that allows us to adjust the weights of the structural interactions to map random homogeneous -in degree- networks into random heterogeneous networks and vice-versa, keeping synchronization values invariant. The results of the proposed transformations reveal an interesting principle; heterogeneous networks can be mapped to homogeneous ones with local information, but the reverse process needs to exploit higher-order information. The formalism provides new analytical insight to tackle real complex scenarios when dealing with uncertainty in the measurements of the underlying connectivity structure.
  • In this work we revisit the nonmonotonic behavior (NMB) of synchronization time with velocity reported for systems of mobile pulse-coupled oscillators (PCOs). We devise a control parameter that allows us to predict in which range of velocities NMB may occur, also uncovering the conditions allowing us to establish the emergence of NMB based on specific features of the connectivity rule. Specifically, our results show that if the connectivity rule is such that the interaction patterns are sparse and, more importantly, include a large fraction of non reciprocal interactions, then the system will display NMB. We furthermore provide a microscopic explanation relating the presence of such features of the connectivity patterns to the existence of local clusters unable to synchronize, termed frustrated clusters, for which we also give a precise definition in terms of simple graph concepts. We conclude that, if the probability of finding a frustrated cluster in a system of moving PCOs is high enough, NMB occurs in a predictable range of velocities.
  • We present a comprehensive computational study of the collective behavior emerging from the competition between self-propulsion, excluded volume interactions and velocity-alignment in a two-dimensionnal model of active particles. We consider an extension of the Active Brownian Particles model where the self-propulsion direction of the particles aligns with the one of their neighbors. We analyze the onset of collective motion (flocking) in a low-density regime (10% surface area) and show that it is mainly controlled by the strength of velocity-alignment interactions: the competition between self-propulsion and crowding effects plays a minor role in the emergence of flocking. However, above the flocking threshold, the system presents a richer pattern formation scenario than analogous models without alignment interactions (Active Brownian Particles) or excluded volume effects (Vicsek-like models). Depending on the parameter regime, the structure of the system is characterized by either a broad distribution of finite-sized polar clusters or the presence of an amorphous, highly fluctuating, large-scale traveling structure which can take a lane-like or band-like form (and usually a hybrid structure which is halfway in between both). We establish a phase diagram that summarizes collective behavior of polar Active Brownian Particles and propose a generic mechanism to describe the complexity of the large-scale structures observed in systems of repulsive self-propelled particles.
  • In this manuscript we propose, analyse, and discuss a possible new principle behind traditional cuisine: the Food-bridging hypothesis and its comparison with the food-pairing hypothesis using the same dataset and graphical models employed in the food-pairing study by Ahn et al. [Scientific Reports, 1:196 (2011)]. The Food-bridging hypothesis assumes that if two ingredients do not share a strong molecular or empirical affinity, they may become affine through a chain of pairwise affinities. That is, in a graphical model as employed by Ahn et al., a chain represents a path that joints the two ingredients, the shortest path represents the strongest pairwise chain of affinities between the two ingredients. Food-pairing and Food-bridging are different hypotheses that may describe possible mechanisms behind the recipes of traditional cuisines. Food-pairing intensifies flavour by mixing ingredients in a recipe with similar chemical compounds, and food-bridging smoothes contrast between ingredients. Both food-pairing and food-bridging are observed in traditional cuisines, as shown in this work. We observed four classes of cuisines according to food-pairing and food-bridging: (1) East Asian cuisines, at one extreme, tend to avoid food-pairing as well as food-bridging; and (4) Latin American cuisines, at the other extreme, follow both principles. For the two middle classes: (2) Southeastern Asian cuisines, avoid food-pairing and follow food-bridging; and (3) Western cuisines, follow food-pairing and avoid food-bridging.
  • We present theoretical and experimental studies on pattern formation with bistable dynamical units coupled in a star network configuration. By applying a localized perturbation to the central or the peripheral elements, we demonstrate the subsequent spreading, pinning, or retraction of the activations; such analysis enables the characterization of the formation of stationary patterns of localized activity. The results are interpreted with a theoretical analysis of a simplified bistable reaction-diffusion model. Weak coupling results in trivial pinned states where the activation cannot propagate. At strong coupling, uniform state is expected with active or inactive elements at small or large degree networks respectively. Nontrivial stationary spatial pattern, corresponding to an activation pinning, is predicted to occur at intermediate number of peripheral elements and at intermediate coupling strengths, where the central activation of the network is pinned, but the peripheral activation propagates toward the center. The results are confirmed in experiments with star networks of bistable electrochemical reactions. The experiments confirm the existence of the stationary spatial patterns and the dependence of coupling strength on the number of peripheral elements for transitions between pinned and retreating or spreading fronts in forced network configurations (where the central or periphery elements are forced to maintain their states).
  • We present a model that takes into account the coupling between evolutionary game dynamics and social influence. Importantly, social influence and game dynamics take place in different domains, which we model as different layers of a multiplex network. We show that the coupling between these dynamical processes can lead to cooperation in scenarios where the pure game dynamics predicts defection. In addition, we show that the structure of the network layers and the relation between them can further increase cooperation. Remarkably, if the layers are related in a certain way, the system can reach a polarized metastable state.These findings could explain the prevalence of polarization observed in many social dilemmas.
  • We found that a network-organized metapopulation of cooperators, defectors and destructive agents playing the public goods game with mutations, can collectively reach global synchronization or chimera states. Global synchronization is accompanied by a collective periodic burst of cooperation, whereas chimera states reflect the tendency of the networked metapopulation to be fragmented in clusters of synchronous and incoherent bursts of cooperation. Numerical simulations have shown that the system's dynamics alternates between these two steady states through a first order transition. Depending on the parameters determining the dynamical and topological properties, chimera states with different numbers of coherent and incoherent clusters are observed. Our results present the first systematic study of chimera states and their characterization in the context of evolutionary game theory. This provides a valuable insight into the details of their occurrence, extending the relevance of such states to natural and social systems.
  • Systems of mobile physical entities exchanging information with their neighborhood can be found in many different situations. The understanding of their emergent cooperative behaviour has become an important issue across disciplines, requiring a general conceptual framework in order to harvest the potential of these systems. We study the synchronization of coupled oscillators in time-evolving networks defined by the positions of self-propelled agents interacting in real space. In order to understand the impact of mobility in the synchronization process on general grounds, we introduce a simple model of self-propelled hard disks performing persistent random walks in 2$d$ space and carrying an internal Kuramoto phase oscillator. For non-interacting particles, self-propulsion accelerates synchronization. The competition between agent mobility and excluded volume interactions gives rise to a richer scenario, leading to an optimal self-propulsion speed. We identify two extreme dynamic regimes where synchronization can be understood from theoretical considerations. A systematic analysis of our model quantifies the departure from the latter ideal situations and characterizes the different mechanisms leading the evolution of the system. We show that the synchronization of locally coupled mobile oscillators generically proceeds through coarsening verifying dynamic scaling and sharing strong similarities with the phase ordering dynamics of the 2$d$ XY model following a quench. Our results shed light into the generic mechanisms leading the synchronization of mobile agents, providing a efficient way to understand more complex or specific situations involving time-dependent networks where synchronization, mobility and excluded volume are at play.
  • The combination of bistability and noise is ubiquitous in complex systems, from biological to social interactions, and has important implications for their functioning and resilience. We analyze a simple three-state model for bistability in networks under varying unbiased noise. In a fully connected network increasing noise yields a collapse of bistability to an unpolarised state. In contrast, in complex networks noise can abruptly switch the polarization state in an irreversible way. When two networks are combined through increasing multiplex coupling, one is dominant and progressively imposes its state on the other, offsetting or promoting the ability of noise to switch polarization. Our results show that dynamical correlations and asymmetry in dynamical processes in networks are sufficient for allowing unbiased noise to produce abrupt irreversible transitions between extremes, which can be neutralized or enhanced by multiplex coupling.
  • Chimera states, namely the coexistence of coherent and incoherent behavior, were previously analyzed in complex networks. However, they have not been extensively studied in modular networks. Here, we consider the neural network of the \textit{C.elegans} soil worm, organized into six interconnected communities, where neurons obey chaotic bursting dynamics. Neurons are assumed to be connected with electrical synapses within their communities and with chemical synapses across them. As our numerical simulations reveal, the coaction of these two types of coupling can shape the dynamics in such a way that chimera-like states can happen. They consist of a fraction of synchronized neurons which belong to the larger communities, and a fraction of desynchronized neurons which are part of smaller communities. In addition to the Kuramoto order parameter $\rho$, we also employ other measures of coherence, such as the chimera-like $\chi$ and metastability $\lambda$ indices, which quantify the degree of synchronization among communities and along time, respectively. We perform the same analysis for networks that share common features with the \textit{C.elegans} neural network. Similar results suggest that under certain assumptions, chimera-like states are prominent phenomena in modular networks, and might provide insight for the behavior of more complex modular networks.
  • Human mobility is becoming an accessible field of study thanks to the progress and availability of tracking technologies as a common feature of smart phones. We describe an example of a scalable experiment exploiting these circumstances at a public, outdoor fair in Barcelona (Spain). Participants were tracked while wandering through an open space with activity stands attracting their attention. We develop a general modeling framework based on Langevin Dynamics, which allows us to test the influence of two distinct types of ingredients on mobility: reactive or context-dependent factors, modelled by means of a force field generated by attraction points in a given spatial configuration, and active or inherent factors, modelled from intrinsic movement patterns of the subjects. The additive and constructive framework model accounts for the observed features. Starting with the simplest model (purely random walkers) as a reference, we progressively introduce different ingredients such as persistence, memory, and perceptual landscape, aiming to untangle active and reactive contributions and quantify their respective relevance. The proposed approach may help in anticipating the spatial distribution of citizens in alternative scenarios and in improving the design of public events based on a facts-based approach.
  • Complex network null models based on entropy maximization are becoming a powerful tool to characterize and analyze data from real systems. However, it is not easy to extract good and unbiased information from these models: A proper understanding of the nature of the underlying events represented in them is crucial. In this paper we emphasize this fact stressing how an accurate counting of configurations compatible with given constraints is fundamental to build good null models for the case of networks with integer valued adjacency matrices constructed from aggregation of one or multiple layers. We show how different assumptions about the elements from which the networks are built give rise to distinctively different statistics, even when considering the same observables to match those of real data. We illustrate our findings by applying the formalism to three datasets using an open-source software package accompanying the present work and demonstrate how such differences are clearly seen when measuring network observables.
  • Understanding human mobility is of vital importance for urban planning, epidemiology, and many other fields that aim to draw policies from the activities of humans in space. Despite recent availability of large scale data sets related to human mobility such as GPS traces, mobile phone data, etc., it is still true that such data sets represent a subsample of the population of interest, and then might give an incomplete picture of the entire population in question. Notwithstanding the abundant usage of such inherently limited data sets, the impact of sampling biases on mobility patterns is unclear -- we do not have methods available to reliably infer mobility information from a limited data set. Here, we investigate the effects of sampling using a data set of millions of taxi movements in New York City. On the one hand, we show that mobility patterns are highly stable once an appropriate simple rescaling is applied to the data, implying negligible loss of information due to subsampling over long time scales. On the other hand, contrasting an appropriate null model on the weighted network of vehicle flows reveals distinctive features which need to be accounted for. Accordingly, we formulate a "supersampling" methodology which allows us to reliably extrapolate mobility data from a reduced sample and propose a number of network-based metrics to reliably assess its quality (and that of other human mobility models). Our approach provides a well founded way to exploit temporal patterns to save effort in recording mobility data, and opens the possibility to scale up data from limited records when information on the full system is needed.
  • Understanding brain connectivity has become one of the most important issues in neuroscience. But connectivity data can reflect either the functional relationships of the brain activities or the anatomical properties between brain areas. Although one should expect a clear relationship between both representations it is not straightforward. Here we present a formalism that allows for the comparison of structural (DTI) and functional (fMRI) networks by embedding both in a common metric space. In this metric space one can then find for which regions the two networks are significantly different. Our methodology can be used not only to compare multimodal networks but also to extract statistically significant aggregated networks of a set of subjects. Actually, we use this procedure to aggregate a set of functional (fMRI) networks from different subjects in an aggregated network that is compared with the anatomical (DTI) connectivity. The comparison of the aggregated network reveals some features that are not observed when the comparison is done with the classical averaged network.
  • The advances in understanding complex networks have generated increasing interest in dynamical processes occurring on them. Pattern formation in activator-inhibitor systems has been studied in networks, revealing differences from the classical continuous media. Here we study pattern formation in a new framework, namely multiplex networks. These are systems where activator and inhibitor species occupy separate nodes in different layers. Species react across layers but diffuse only within their own layer of distinct network topology. This multiplicity generates heterogeneous patterns with significant differences from those observed in single-layer networks. Remarkably, diffusion-induced instability can occur even if the two species have the same mobility rates; condition which can never destabilize single-layer networks. The instability condition is revealed using perturbation theory and expressed by a combination of degrees in the different layers. Our theory demonstrates that the existence of such topology-driven instabilities is generic in multiplex networks, providing a new mechanism of pattern formation.
  • Complex networks grow subject to structural constraints which affect their measurable properties. Assessing the effect that such constraints impose on their observables is thus a crucial aspect to be taken into account in their analysis. To this end,we examine the effect of fixing the strength sequence in multi-edge networks on several network observables such as degrees, disparity, average neighbor properties and weight distribution using an ensemble approach. We provide a general method to calculate any desired weighted network metric and we show that several features detected in real data could be explained solely by structural constraints. We thus justify the need of analytical null models to be used as basis to assess the relevance of features found in real data represented in weighted network form.
  • Statistical properties of binary complex networks are well understood and recently many attempts have been made to extend this knowledge to weighted ones. There is, however, a subtle difference between networks where weights are continuos variables and those where they account for discrete, distinguishable events, which we call multi-edge networks. In this work we face this problem introducing multi-edge networks as graphs where multiple (distinguishable) connections between nodes are considered. We develop a statistical mechanics framework where it is possible to get information about the most relevant observables given a large spectrum of linear and nonlinear constraints including those depending both on the number of multi-edges per link and their binary projection. The latter case is particularly interesting as we show that binary projections can be understood from multi-edge processes. The implications of these results are important as many real agent based problems mapped onto graphs require of this treatment for a proper characterization of its collective behavior.
  • One of the more challenging tasks in the understanding of dynamical properties of models on top of complex networks is to capture the precise role of multiplex topologies. In a recent paper, Gomez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 028701 (2013)] proposed a framework for the study of diffusion processes in such networks. Here, we extend the previous framework to deal with general configurations in several layers of networks, and analyze the behavior of the spectrum of the Laplacian of the full multiplex. We derive an interesting decoupling of the problem that allow us to unravel the role played by the interconnections of the multiplex in the dynamical processes on top of them. Capitalizing on this decoupling we perform an asymptotic analysis that allow us to derive analytical expressions for the full spectrum of eigenvalues. This spectrum is used to gain insight into physical phenomena on top of multiplex, specifically, diffusion processes and synchronizability.
  • We study a Kuramoto model in which the oscillators are associated with the nodes of a complex network and the interactions include a phase frustration, thus preventing full synchronization. The system organizes into a regime of remote synchronization where pairs of nodes with the same network symmetry are fully synchronized, despite their distance on the graph. We provide analytical arguments to explain this result and we show how the frustration parameter affects the distribution of phases. An application to brain networks suggests that anatomical symmetry plays a role in neural synchronization by determining correlated functional modules across distant locations.
  • Finding efficient algorithms to explore large networks with the aim of recovering information about their structure is an open problem. Here, we investigate this challenge by proposing a model in which random walkers with previously assigned home nodes navigate through the network during a fixed amount of time. We consider that the exploration is successful if the walker gets the information gathered back home, otherwise, no data is retrieved. Consequently, at each time step, the walkers, with some probability, have the choice to either go backward approaching their home or go farther away. We show that there is an optimal solution to this problem in terms of the average information retrieved and the degree of the home nodes and design an adaptive strategy based on the behavior of the random walker. Finally, we compare different strategies that emerge from the model in the context of network reconstruction. Our results could be useful for the discovery of unknown connections in large scale networks.
  • We study the time scales associated to diffusion processes that take place on multiplex networks, i.e. on a set of networks linked through interconnected layers. To this end, we propose the construction of a supra-Laplacian matrix, which consists of a dimensional lifting of the Laplacian matrix of each layer of the multiplex network. We use perturbative analysis to reveal analytically the structure of eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the complete network in terms of the spectral properties of the individual layers. The spectrum of the supra-Laplacian allows us to understand the physics of diffusion-like processes on top of multiplex networks.
  • We present a model of integrate and fire oscillators that move on a plane. The phase of the oscillators evolves linearly in time and when it reaches a threshold value they fire choosing their neighbors according to a certain interaction range. Depending on the velocity of the ballistic motion and the average number of neighbors each oscillator fires to, we identify different regimes shown in a phase diagram. We characterize these regimes by means of novel parameters as the accumulated number of contacted neighbors.
  • We analyze the emergence of synchronization in a population of moving integrate-and-fire oscillators. Oscillators, while moving on a plane, interact with their nearest neighbor upon firing time. We discover a non-monotonic dependence of the synchronization time on the velocity of the agents. Moreover, we find that mechanisms that drive synchronization are different for different dynamical regimes. We report the extreme situation where an interplay between the time-scales involved in the dynamical processes completely inhibit the achievement of a coherent state. We also provide estimators for the transitions between the different regimes.
  • We study synchronization dynamics in networks of coupled oscillators with bimodal distribution of natural frequencies. This setup can be interpreted as a simple model of frequency synchronization dynamics among generators and loads working in a power network. We derive the minimum coupling strength required to ensure global frequency synchronization. This threshold value can be efficiently found by solving a binary optimization problem, even for large networks. In order to validate our procedure, we compare its results with numerical simulations on a realistic network describing the European interconnected high-voltage electricity system, finding a very good agreement. Our synchronization threshold can be used to test the stability of frequency synchronization to link removals. As the threshold value changes only in very few cases when aplied to the European realistic network, we conclude that network is resilient in this regard. Since the threshold calculation depends on the local connectivity, it can also be used to identify critical network partitions acting as synchronization bottlenecks. In our stability experiments we observe that when a link removal triggers a change in the critical partition, its limits tend to converge to national borders. This phenomenon, which can have important consequences to synchronization dynamics in case of cascading failure, signals the influence of the uncomplete topological integration of national power grids at the European scale.