• BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects are the prominent members of the third {\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope catalog of $\gamma$-ray sources. Half of the BL Lac population ($\sim$ 300) lack redshift measurements, which is due to the absence of lines in their optical spectrum, thereby making it difficult to utilize spectroscopic methods. Our photometric drop-out technique can be used to establish the redshift for a fraction of these sources. This work employed 6 filters mounted on the $Swift$-UVOT and 4 optical filters on two telescopes, the 0.65 m SARA-CTIO in Chile and 1.0 m SARA-ORM in the Canary Islands, Spain. A sample of 15 sources was extracted from the $Swift$ archival data for which 6 filter UVOT observations were conducted. By complementing the {\it Swift} observations with the SARA ones, we were able to discover two high redshift sources: 3FGL J1155.4-3417 and 3FGL J1156.7-2250 at $z=1.83^{+0.10}_{-0.13}$ and $z=1.73^{+0.11}_{-0.19}$ , respectively, resulting from the dropouts in the powerlaw template fits to these data. The discoveries add to the important (26 total) sample of high-redshift BL Lacs. While the sample of high-z BL Lacs is still rather small, these objects do not seem to fit well within known schemes of the blazar population and represent the best probes of the extragalactic background light.
  • The extragalactic background light (EBL), from ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths, is predominantly due to emission from stars, accreting black holes and reprocessed light due to Galactic dust. The EBL can be studied through the imprint it leaves, via $\gamma$-$\gamma$ absorption of high-energy photons, in the spectra of distant $\gamma$-ray sources. The EBL has been probed through the search for the attenuation it produces in the spectra of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects and individual $\gamma$-ray bursts (GRBs). GRBs have significant advantages over blazars for the study of the EBL especially at high redshifts. Here we analyze a combined sample of twenty-two GRBs, detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope between 65 MeV and 500 GeV. We report a marginal detection (at the ~2.8 $\sigma$ level) of the EBL attenuation in the stacked spectra of the source sample. This measurement represents a first constraint of the EBL at an effective redshift of ~1.8. We combine our results with prior EBL constraints and conclude that Fermi-LAT is instrumental to constrain the UV component of the EBL. We discuss the implications on existing empirical models of EBL evolution.
  • The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the radiation accumulated through the history of the Universe in the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to the far infrared. Local foregrounds make the direct measurement of the diffuse EBL notoriously difficult, while robust lower limits have been obtained by adding up the contributions of all the discrete sources resolved in deep infrared and optical galaxy observations. Gamma-ray astronomy has emerged in the past few years as a powerful tool for the study of the EBL: very-high-energy (VHE) photons traversing cosmological distances can interact with EBL photons to produce e$^+$e$^-$ pairs, resulting in an energy-dependent depletion of the gamma-ray flux of distant sources that can be used to set constraints on the EBL density. The study of the EBL is one of the key scientific programs currently carried out by the MAGIC collaboration. We present here the results of the analysis of 32 VHE spectra of 12 blazars in the redshift range 0.03 - 0.94, obtained with over 300 hours of observations with the MAGIC telescopes between 2010 and 2016. A combined likelihood maximization approach is used to evaluate the density and spectrum of the EBL most consistent with the MAGIC observations. The results are compatible with state-of-the-art EBL models, and constrain the EBL density to be roughly within $\simeq 20\%$ of the nominal value in such models. The study reveals no anomalies in gamma-ray propagation in the large optical depth regime - contrary to some claims based on meta-analyses of published VHE spectra.
  • We analyze the spectra of 300,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) with stellar masses $M_* \gtrsim 10^{11} M_{\odot}$ from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). By studying their star-formation histories, we find two main evolutionary paths converging into the same quiescent galaxy population at $z\sim0.55$. Fast-growing LRGs assemble $80\%$ of their stellar mass very early on ($z\sim5$), whereas slow-growing LRGs reach the same evolutionary state at $z\sim1.5$. Further investigation reveals that their clustering properties on scales of $\sim$1-30 Mpc are, at a high level of significance, also different. Fast-growing LRGs are found to be more strongly clustered and reside in overall denser large-scale structure environments than slow-growing systems, for a given stellar-mass threshold. Our results imply a dependence of clustering on stellar-mass assembly history (naturally connected to the mass-formation history of the corresponding halos) for a homogeneous population of similar mass and color, which constitutes a strong observational evidence of galaxy assembly bias.
  • The star formation histories (SFHs) of dwarf galaxies are thought to be \emph{bursty}, with large -- order of magnitude -- changes in the star formation rate on timescales similar to O-star lifetimes. As a result, the standard interpretations of many galaxy observables (which assume a slowly varying SFH) are often incorrect. Here, we use the SFHs from hydro-dynamical simulations to investigate the effects of bursty SFHs on sample selection and interpretation of observables and make predictions to confirm such SFHs in future surveys. First, because dwarf galaxies' star formation rates change rapidly, the mass-to-light ratio is also changing rapidly in both the ionizing continuum and, to a lesser extent, the non-ionizing UV continuum. Therefore, flux limited surveys are highly biased toward selecting galaxies in the \emph{burst} phase and very deep observations are required to detect all dwarf galaxies at a given stellar mass. Second, we show that a $\log_{10}[\nu L_{\nu}(1500{\rm \AA})/L_{{\rm H}\alpha}]>2.5$ implies a very recent quenching of star formation and can be used as evidence of stellar feedback regulating star formation. Third, we show that the ionizing continuum can be significantly higher than when assuming a constant SFH, which can affect the interpretation of nebular emission line equivalent widths and direct ionizing continuum detections. Finally, we show that a star formation rate estimate based on continuum measurements only (and not on nebular tracers such as the hydrogen Balmer lines) will not trace the rapid changes in star formation and will give the false impression of a star-forming main sequence with low dispersion.
  • We present results from near-infrared spectroscopy of 26 emission-line galaxies at z ~ 2 obtained with the FIRE spectrometer on the Magellan Baade telescope. The sample was selected from the WISP survey, which uses the near-infrared grism of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect emission-line galaxies over 0.3 < z < 2.3. Our FIRE follow-up spectroscopy (R~5000) over 1.0-2.5 micron permits detailed measurements of physical properties of the z~2 emission-line galaxies. Dust-corrected star formation rates for the sample range from ~5-100 M_sun yr-1. We derive a median metallicity for the sample of ~0.45 Z_sun, and the estimated stellar masses range from ~10^8.5 - 10^9.5 M_sun. The average ionization parameters measured for the sample are typically much higher than what is found for local star-forming galaxies. We derive composite spectra from the FIRE sample, from which we infer typical nebular electron densities of ~100-400 cm^-3. Based on the location of the galaxies and composite spectra on BPT diagrams, we do not find evidence for significant AGN activity in the sample. Most of the galaxies as well as the composites are offset in the BPT diagram toward higher [O III]/H-beta at a given [N II]/H-alpha, in agreement with other observations of z > 1 star-forming galaxies, but composite spectra derived from the sample do not show an appreciable offset from the local star-forming sequence on the [O III]/H-beta versus [S II]/H-alpha diagram. We infer a high nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio from the composite spectrum, which may contribute to the offset of the high-redshift galaxies from the local star-forming sequence in the [O III]/H-beta versus [N II]/H-alpha diagram. We speculate that the elevated nitrogen abundance could result from substantial numbers of Wolf-Rayet stars in starbursting galaxies at z~2. (Abridged)
  • Our understanding of the nature of the extragalactic background light (EBL) has improved with the recent development of gamma-ray observation techniques. An open subject in the context of the EBL is the reionization epoch, which is an important probe of the formation history of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III) stars. Although the mechanisms for the formation of Pop III stars are rather well understood on theoretical grounds, their formation history is still veiled in mystery because of their faintness. To shed light into this matter, we study jointly the gamma-ray opacity of distant objects and the reionization constraints from studies of intergalactic gas. By combining these studies, we obtain a sensitive upper bound on the Pop III star formation rate density as $\dot\rho_{*}(z)<0.01[(1+z)/{(1+7.0)}]^{3.4}({f_{\rm esc}}/{0.2})^{-1}({C}/{3.0})\ {\rm M}_{\odot} {\rm yr}^{-1}\ {\rm Mpc}^{-3}$ at $z\ge7$, where $f_{\rm esc}$ and $C$ are the escape fraction of ionizing photons from galaxies and the clumping factor of the intergalactic hydrogen gas. This limit is a $\sim10$ times tighter constraint compared with previous studies that take into account gamma-ray opacity constraints only. Even if we do not include the current gamma-ray constraints, the results do not change. This is because the detected gamma-ray sources are still at $z\le4.35$ where the reionization has already finished.
  • We present near-infrared emission line counts and luminosity functions from the HST WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program for 29 fields (0.037 deg^2) observed using both the G102 and G141 grisms. Altogether we identify 1048 emission line galaxies with observed equivalent widths greater than 40 Angstroms, 467 of which have multiple detected emission lines. The WISP survey is sensitive to fainter flux levels (3-5x10^-17 ergs/s/cm^2) than the future space near-infrared grism missions aimed at baryonic acoustic oscillation cosmology (1-4x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2), allowing us to probe the fainter emission line galaxies that the shallower future surveys may miss. Cumulative number counts of 0.7<z<1.5 galaxies reach 10,000 deg^-2 above an H-alpha flux of 2x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2. H-alpha-emitting galaxies with comparable [OIII] flux are roughly 5 times less common than galaxies with just H-alpha emission at those flux levels. Galaxies with low H-alpha/[OIII] ratios are very rare at the brighter fluxes that future near-infrared grism surveys will probe; our survey finds no galaxies with H-alpha/[OIII] < 0.95 that have H-alpha flux greater than 3x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2. Our H-alpha luminosity function contains a comparable number density of faint line emitters to that found by the NICMOS near-infrared grism surveys, but significantly fewer (factors of 3-4 less) high luminosity emitters. We also find that our high redshift (z=0.9-1.5) counts are in agreement with the high redshift (z=1.47) narrow band H-alpha survey of HiZELS (Sobral et al. 2013), while our lower redshift luminosity function (z=0.3-0.9) falls slightly below their z=0.84 result. The evolution in both the H-alpha luminosity function from z=0.3--1.5 and the [OIII] luminosity function from z=0.7-2.3 is almost entirely in the L* parameter, which steadily increases with redshift over those ranges.
  • We present the first robust measurement of the high redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at 10^{8}< M/M_{\sun} < 10^{10}, obtained by stacking spectra of 83 emission-line galaxies with secure redshifts between 1.3 < z < 2.3. For these redshifts, infrared grism spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 is sensitive to the R23 metallicity diagnostic: ([OII]3726,3729 + [OIII] 4959,5007)/H\beta. Using spectra stacked in four mass quartiles, we find a MZ relation that declines significantly with decreasing mass, extending from 12+log(O/H) = 8.8 at M=10^{9.8} M_{\sun} to 12+log(O/H)= 8.2 at M=10^{8.2} M_{\sun}. After correcting for systematic offsets between metallicity indicators, we compare our MZ relation to measurements from the stacked spectra of galaxies with M>10^{9.5} M_{\sun} and z~2.3. Within the statistical uncertainties, our MZ relation agrees with the z~2.3 result, particularly since our somewhat higher metallicities (by around 0.1 dex) are qualitatively consistent with the lower mean redshift z=1.76 of our sample. For the masses probed by our data, the MZ relation shows a steep slope which is suggestive of feedback from energy-driven winds, and a cosmological downsizing evolution where high mass galaxies reach the local MZ relation at earlier times. In addition, we show that our sample falls on an extrapolation of the star-forming main sequence (the SFR-M_{*} relation) at this redshift. This result indicates that grism emission-line selected samples do not have preferentially high SFRs. Finally, we report no evidence for evolution of the mass-metallicity-SFR plane; our stack-averaged measurements show excellent agreement with the local relation.
  • The extragalactic background light (EBL) is of fundamental importance both for understanding the entire process of galaxy evolution and for gamma-ray astronomy. However, the overall spectrum of the EBL between 0.1 and 1000 microns has never been determined directly neither from observed luminosity functions (LFs), over a wide redshift range, nor from any multiwavelength observation of galaxy spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The evolving, overall spectrum of the EBL is derived here utilizing a novel method based on observations only. It is emphasized that the local EBL seems already well constrained from the UV up to the mid-IR. Since different independent methodologies such as direct measurement, galaxy counts, gamma-ray attenuation and realistic EBL modelings point towards the same EBL intensity level. A relevant contribution from Pop III stars to the local EBL seems unlikely.
  • Data from (non-) attenuation of gamma rays from active galactic nuclei (AGN) and gamma ray bursts (GRBs) give upper limits on the extragalactic background light (EBL) from the UV to the mid-IR that are only a little above the lower limits from observed galaxies. These upper limits now rule out some EBL models and purported observations, with improved data likely to provide even stronger constraints. We present EBL calculations both based on multiwavelength observations of thousands of galaxies and also based on semi-analytic models, and show that they are consistent with these lower limits from observed galaxies and with the gamma-ray upper limit constraints. Such comparisons "close the loop" on cosmological galaxy formation models, since they account for all the light, including that from galaxies too faint to see. We compare our results with those of other recent works, and discuss the implications of these new EBL calculations for gamma ray attenuation. Catching a few GRBs with groundbased atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope (ACT) arrays or water Cherenkov detectors could provide important new constraints on the high-redshift star formation history of the universe.
  • Axion Like Particles (ALPs), postulated to solve the strong-CP problem, are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields, which may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as AGNs. Here we simultaneously consider in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. We show that photon/axion mixing could explain recent puzzles regarding the observed spectra of distant gamma-ray sources as well as the recently published lower limit to the EBL intensity. We finally summarize the different signatures expected and discuss the best strategy to search for ALPs with the Fermi satellite and current Cherenkov telescopes like CANGAROO, HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS.