• We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of globular clusters (GCs) around the ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) VLSB-B, VLSB-D, and VCC615 located in the central regions of the Virgo cluster. We spectroscopically identify 4, 12, and 7 GC satellites of these UDGs, respectively. We find that the three UDGs have systemic velocities ($V_{sys}$) consistent with being in the Virgo cluster, and that they span a wide range of velocity dispersions, from $\sim 16$ to $\sim 47$ km/s, and high dynamical mass-to-light ratios within the radius that contains half the number of GCs ($ 407^{+916}_{-407}$, $21^{+15}_{-11}$, $60^{+65}_{-38}$, respectively). VLSB-D shows possible evidence for rotation along the stellar major axis and its $V_{sys}$ is consistent with that of the massive galaxy M84 and the center of the Virgo cluster itself. These findings, in addition to having a dynamically and spatially ($\sim 1$ kpc) off-centered nucleus and being extremely elongated, suggest that VLSB-D could be tidally perturbed. On the contrary, VLSB-B and VCC615 show no signals of tidal deformation. Whereas the dynamics of VLSB-D suggest that it has a less massive dark matter halo than expected for its stellar mass, VLSB-B and VCC615 are consistent with a $\sim 10^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$ dark matter halo. Although our samples of galaxies and GCs are small, these results suggest that UDGs may be a diverse population, with their low surface brightnesses being the result of very early formation, tidal disruption, or a combination of the two.
  • We present the MUSE observations of UGC 6697, a giant (Mstar 10^{10} Msol) spiral galaxy infalling in the nearby cluster Abell 1367. During its high velocity transit through the intracluster medium (ICM), the hydrodynamical interactions with the ICM produce a ~ 100 kpc tail of ionized gas that we map with a mosaic of five MUSE pointings up to 60 kpc from the galaxy. CGCG 97087N, a small companion that lies at few arcminutes in projection from UGC 6697, is also suffering from the hydrodynamic action of the ICM of the cluster. Along the whole extent of the tail we detect diffuse H$\alpha$ emission and, to a lesser extent, H$\beta$, [OIII]$\lambda5007$, and [OI]$\lambda6300$. By comparing the kinematics and distribution of gas and stars (as traced by the CaII triplet) for both galaxies, we separate the ionized gas, as traced by the H$\alpha$ line, in a component still bound to the galaxy and a component that is stripped. We find that the "onboard" component shows low velocity dispersion and line ratios consistent with photoionization by hot stars. The stripped gas is more turbulent, with velocity dispersions up to > 100 km/s}, and is excited by shocks as traced by high values of [OI]/H$\alpha$ and [NII]/H$\alpha$ ratio. In the tail of UGC 6697 we identify numerous bright compact knots with line ratios typical of HII regions. These are distributed along the only streams of stripped gas retaining low velocity dispersions (< 35 km/s). Despite being in the stripped gas, their physical properties do not differentiate from normal HII regions in galactic disks. We find evidence of a past fast encounter between the two galaxies in the form of a double tail emerging from CGCG 97087N that connects with UGC 6697. This encounter might have increased the efficiency of the stripping process, leaving the stellar distribution and kinematics unaltered.
  • Early-type dwarf galaxies are not simply featureless, old objects, but were found to be much more diverse, hosting substructures and a variety of stellar population properties. To explore the stellar content of faint early-type galaxies, and to investigate in particular those with recent central star formation, we study colours and colour gradients within one effective radius in optical (g-r) and near-infrared (i-H) bands for 120 Virgo cluster early types with -19 mag < $M_{r}$ < -16 mag. Twelve galaxies turn out to have blue cores, when defined as g-r colour gradients larger than 0.10 mag/$R_{\rm eff}$, which represents the positive tail of the gradient distribution. For these galaxies, we find that they have the strongest age gradients, and that even outside the blue core, their mean stellar population is younger than the mean of ordinary faint early types. The metallicity gradients of these blue-cored early-type dwarf galaxies are, however, in the range of most normal faint early types, which we find to have non-zero gradients with higher central metallicity. The blue central regions are consistent with star formation activity within the last few 100 Myr. We discuss that these galaxies could be explained by environmental quenching of star formation in the outer galaxy regions, while the inner star formation activity has continued.
  • We present an observational study of the effect of bars on the gas component and on the star formation properties of their host galaxies in a statistically significant sample of resolved objects, the $Herschel$ Reference Sample. The analysis of optical and far--infrared images allows us to identify a clear spatial correlation between stellar bars and the cold-gas distribution mapped by the warm dust emission. We find that the infrared counterparts of optically identified bars are either bar--like structures or dead central regions in which star formation is strongly suppressed. Similar morphologies are found in the distribution of star formation directly traced by H$\alpha$ maps. The sizes of such optical and infrared structures correlate remarkably well, hinting at a causal connection. In the light of previous observations and of theoretical investigations in the literature, we interpret our findings as further evidence of the scenario in which bars drive strong inflows toward their host nuclei: young bars are still in the process of perturbing the gas and star formation clearly delineates the shape of the bars; old bars on the contrary already removed any gas within their extents, carving a dead region of negligible star formation.
  • The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey is a deep (with a $2\sigma$ detection limit $\mu_g$ = 29~mag~arcsec$^{-2}$ in the $g-$band) optical panchromatic survey targeting the Virgo cluster from its core to virial radius, for a total areal coverage of 104 square degrees. As such, the survey is well suited for the study of galaxies' outskirts, haloes and low surface brightness features that arise from dynamical interactions within the cluster environment. We report the discovery of extremely faint ($\mu_g$ $>$ 25 mag arcsec$^{-2}$) shells in three Virgo cluster early-type dwarf galaxies, VCC~1361, VCC~1447 and VCC~1668. Among them, VCC~1447 has an absolute magnitude M$_{g}$ = -11.71 mag and is {\it the least massive galaxy with a shell system discovered to date}. We present a detailed study of these low surface brightness features. We detect between three and four shells in each of our galaxies. Within the uncertainties, we find no evidence of a color difference between the galaxy main body and shell features. The observed arcs of the shells are located upto several effective radii of the galaxies. We further explore the origin of these low surface brightness features with the help of idealized numerical simulations. We find that a near equal mass merger is best able to reproduce the main properties of the shells, including their quite symmetric appearance and their alignment along the major axis of the galaxy. The simulations provide support for a formation scenario in which a recent merger, between two near-equal mass, gas-free dwarf galaxies forms the observed shell systems.
  • We use deep optical photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey [NGVS] to investigate the color-magnitude diagram for the galaxies inhabiting the core of this cluster. The sensitivity of the NGVS imaging allows us to continuously probe galaxy colors over a factor of $\sim 2 \times 10^5$ in luminosity, from brightest cluster galaxies to scales overlapping classical satellites of the Milky Way [$M_{g^{\prime}}$ $\sim$ $-$9; $M_{*}$ $\sim 10^6$ M$_{\odot}$], within a single environment. Remarkably, we find the first evidence that the RS flattens in all colors at the faint-magnitude end [starting between $-$14 $\le$ $M_{g^{\prime}}$ $\le$ $-$13, around $M_{*}$ $\sim 4 \times 10^7$ M$_{\odot}$], with the slope decreasing to $\sim$60% or less of its value at brighter magnitudes. This could indicate that the stellar populations of faint dwarfs in Virgo's core share similar characteristics [e.g. constant mean age] over $\sim$3 mags in luminosity, suggesting that these galaxies were quenched coevally, likely via pre-processing in smaller hosts. We also compare our results to galaxy formation models, finding that the RS in model clusters have slopes at intermediate magnitudes that are too shallow, and in the case of semi-analytic models, do not reproduce the flattening seen at both extremes [bright/faint] of the Virgo RS. Deficiencies in the chemical evolution of model galaxies likely contribute to the model-data discrepancies at all masses, while overly efficient quenching may also be a factor at dwarf scales. Deep UV and near-IR photometry are required to unambiguously diagnose the cause of the faint-end flattening.
  • In most studies of dust in galaxies, dust is only detected from its emission to approximately the optical radius of the galaxy. By combining the signal of 110 spiral galaxies observed as part of the Herschel Reference Survey, we are able to improve our sensitivity by an order-of-magnitude over that for a single object. Here we report the direct detection of dust from its emission that extends out to at least twice the optical radius. We find that the distribution of dust is consistent with an exponential at all radii with a gradient of ~-1.7 dex R$_{25}^{-1}$. Our dust temperature declines linearly from ~25 K in the centre to 15 K at R$_{25}$ from where it remains constant out to ~2.0 R$_{25}$. The surface-density of dust declines with radius at a similar rate to the surface-density of stars but more slowly than the surface-density of the star-formation rate. Studies based on dust extinction and reddening of high-redshift quasars have concluded that there are substantial amounts of dust in intergalactic space. By combining our results with the number counts and angular correlation function from the SDSS, we show that with Milky Way type dust we can explain the reddening of the quasars by the dust within galactic disks alone. Given the uncertainties in the properties of any intergalactic dust, we cannot rule out its existence, but our results show that statistical investigations of the dust in galactic halos that use the reddening of high-redshift objects must take account of the dust in galactic disks.
  • Alan McConnachie, Carine Babusiaux, Michael Balogh, Simon Driver, Pat Côté, Helene Courtois, Luke Davies, Laura Ferrarese, Sarah Gallagher, Rodrigo Ibata, Nicolas Martin, Aaron Robotham, Kim Venn, Eva Villaver, Jo Bovy, Alessandro Boselli, Matthew Colless, Johan Comparat, Kelly Denny, Pierre-Alain Duc, Sara Ellison, Richard de Grijs, Mirian Fernandez-Lorenzo, Ken Freeman, Raja Guhathakurta, Patrick Hall, Andrew Hopkins, Mike Hudson, Andrew Johnson, Nick Kaiser, Jun Koda, Iraklis Konstantopoulos, George Koshy, Khee-Gan Lee, Adi Nusser, Anna Pancoast, Eric Peng, Celine Peroux, Patrick Petitjean, Christophe Pichon, Bianca Poggianti, Carlo Schmid, Prajval Shastri, Yue Shen, Chris Willot, Scott Croom, Rosine Lallement, Carlo Schimd, Dan Smith, Matthew Walker, Jon Willis, Alessandro Bosselli Matthew Colless, Aruna Goswami, Matt Jarvis, Eric Jullo, Jean-Paul Kneib, Iraklis Konstantopoloulous, Jeff Newman, Johan Richard, Firoza Sutaria, Edwar Taylor, Ludovic van Waerbeke, Giuseppina Battaglia, Pat Hall, Misha Haywood, Charli Sakari, Carlo Schmid, Arnaud Seibert, Sivarani Thirupathi, Yuting Wang, Yiping Wang, Ferdinand Babas, Steve Bauman, Elisabetta Caffau, Mary Beth Laychak, David Crampton, Daniel Devost, Nicolas Flagey, Zhanwen Han, Clare Higgs, Vanessa Hill, Kevin Ho, Sidik Isani, Shan Mignot, Rick Murowinski, Gajendra Pandey, Derrick Salmon, Arnaud Siebert, Doug Simons, Else Starkenburg, Kei Szeto, Brent Tully, Tom Vermeulen, Kanoa Withington, Nobuo Arimoto, Martin Asplund, Herve Aussel, Michele Bannister, Harish Bhatt, SS Bhargavi, John Blakeslee, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James Bullock, Denis Burgarella, Tzu-Ching Chang, Andrew Cole, Jeff Cooke, Andrew Cooper, Paola Di Matteo, Ginevra Favole, Hector Flores, Bryan Gaensler, Peter Garnavich, Karoline Gilbert, Rosa Gonzalez-Delgado, Puragra Guhathakurta, Guenther Hasinger, Falk Herwig, Narae Hwang, Pascale Jablonka, Matthew Jarvis, Umanath Kamath, Lisa Kewley, Damien Le Borgne, Geraint Lewis, Robert Lupton, Sarah Martell, Mario Mateo, Olga Mena, David Nataf, Jeffrey Newman, Enrique Pérez, Francisco Prada, Mathieu Puech, Alejandra Recio-Blanco, Annie Robin, Will Saunders, Daniel Smith, C.S. Stalin, Charling Tao, Karun Thanjuvur, Laurence Tresse, Ludo van Waerbeke, Jian-Min Wang, David Yong, Gongbo Zhao, Patrick Boisse, James Bolton, Piercarlo Bonifacio, Francois Bouchy, Len Cowie, Katia Cunha, Magali Deleuil, Ernst de Mooij, Patrick Dufour, Sebastien Foucaud, Karl Glazebrook, John Hutchings, Chiaki Kobayashi, Rolf-Peter Kudritzki, Yang-Shyang Li, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Martin Makler, Norio Narita, Changbom Park, Ryan Ransom, Swara Ravindranath, Bacham Eswar Reddy, Marcin Sawicki, Luc Simard, Raghunathan Srianand, Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann, Keiichi Umetsu, Ting-Gui Wang, Jong-Hak Woo, Xue-Bing Wu
    May 31, 2016 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    MSE is an 11.25m aperture observatory with a 1.5 square degree field of view that will be fully dedicated to multi-object spectroscopy. More than 3200 fibres will feed spectrographs operating at low (R ~ 2000 - 3500) and moderate (R ~ 6000) spectral resolution, and approximately 1000 fibers will feed spectrographs operating at high (R ~ 40000) resolution. MSE is designed to enable transformational science in areas as diverse as tomographic mapping of the interstellar and intergalactic media; the in-situ chemical tagging of thick disk and halo stars; connecting galaxies to their large scale structure; measuring the mass functions of cold dark matter sub-halos in galaxy and cluster-scale hosts; reverberation mapping of supermassive black holes in quasars; next generation cosmological surveys using redshift space distortions and peculiar velocities. MSE is an essential follow-up facility to current and next generations of multi-wavelength imaging surveys, including LSST, Gaia, Euclid, WFIRST, PLATO, and the SKA, and is designed to complement and go beyond the science goals of other planned and current spectroscopic capabilities like VISTA/4MOST, WHT/WEAVE, AAT/HERMES and Subaru/PFS. It is an ideal feeder facility for E-ELT, TMT and GMT, and provides the missing link between wide field imaging and small field precision astronomy. MSE is optimized for high throughput, high signal-to-noise observations of the faintest sources in the Universe with high quality calibration and stability being ensured through the dedicated operational mode of the observatory. (abridged)
  • We present measurements of the galaxy luminosity and stellar mass function in a 3.71 deg$^2$ (0.3 Mpc$^2$) area in the core of the Virgo cluster, based on $ugriz$ data from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). The galaxy sample consists of 352 objects brighter than $M_g=-9.13$ mag, the 50% completeness limit of the survey. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find a best-fit faint end slope of $\alpha=-1.33 \pm 0.02$ for the g-band luminosity function; consistent results are found for the stellar mass function as well as the luminosity function in the other four NGVS bandpasses. We discuss the implications for the faint-end slope of adding 92 ultra compact dwarfs galaxies (UCDs) -- previously compiled by the NGVS in this region -- to the galaxy sample, assuming that UCDs are the stripped remnants of nucleated dwarf galaxies. Under this assumption, the slope of the luminosity function (down to the UCD faint magnitude limit, $M_g = -9.6$ mag) increases dramatically, up to $\alpha = -1.60 \pm 0.06$ when correcting for the expected number of disrupted non-nucleated galaxies. We also calculate the total number of UCDs and globular clusters that may have been deposited in the core of Virgo due to the disruption of satellites, both nucleated and non-nucleated. We estimate that ~150 objects with $M_g\lesssim-9.6$ mag and that are currently classified as globular clusters, might, in fact, be the nuclei of disrupted galaxies. We further estimate that as many as 40% of the (mostly blue) globular clusters in the core of Virgo might once have belonged to such satellites; these same disrupted satellites might have contributed ~40% of the total luminosity in galaxies observed in the core region today. Finally, we use an updated Local Group galaxy catalog to provide a new measurement of the luminosity function of Local Group satellites, $\alpha=-1.21\pm0.05$.
  • The Star formation rate (SFR) is a crucial parameter to investigate galaxy evolution. At low redshift the cosmic SFR density declines smoothly, and massive active galaxies become passive, reducing their star formation activity. This implies that the bulk of the SFR density at low redshift is mainly driven by low mass objects. We investigate the properties of a sample of low luminosity Far-Infrared (FIR) sources selected at 250 microns from Pappalardo et al. (2015). We have collected data from Ultraviolet to FIR to perform a multi-wavelengths analysis. The main goal is to investigate the correlation between SFR, stellar mass, and dust mass for a galaxy population with a wide range in dust content and stellar mass, including the low mass regime that most probably dominates the SFR density at low z. We define a main sample of ~800 sources with full Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) coverage between 0.15 < lambda < 500 microns and an extended sample with ~5000 sources in which we remove the constraints on the Ultraviolet and Near-Infrared bands. We analyze both samples with two different SED fitting methods: MAGPHYS and CIGALE. In the SFR versus stellar mass plane our samples occupy a region included between local spirals and higher redshift star forming galaxies. The galaxies subsample with the higher masses (M* > 3e10 Msol) does not lie on the main sequence, but shows a small offset, as a consequence of the decreased star formation. Low mass galaxies (M* < 1e10 Msol) settle in the main sequence with SFR and stellar mass consistent with local spirals. Deep Herschel data allow the identification of a mixed galaxy population, with galaxies still in an assembly phase, or galaxies at the beginning of their passive evolution. We find that the dust luminosity is the parameter that discriminates these two galaxy populations.
  • We analyze the kinematics of six Virgo cluster dwarf early-type galaxies (dEs) from their globular cluster (GC) systems. We present new Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy for three of them and reanalyze the data found in the literature for the remaining three. We use two independent methods to estimate the rotation amplitude (Vmax) and velocity dispersion (sigma_GC) of the GC systems and evaluate their statistical significance by simulating non-rotating GC systems with the same number of GC satellites and velocity uncertainties. Our measured kinematics agree with the published values for the three galaxies from the literature and, in all cases, some rotation is measured. However, our simulations show that the null hypothesis of being non-rotating GC systems cannot be ruled out. In the case of VCC1861, the measured Vmax and the simulations indicate that it is not rotating. In the case of VCC1528, the null hypothesis can be marginally ruled out, thus, it might be rotating although further confirmation is needed. In our analysis, we find that, in general, the measured Vmax tends to be overestimated and the measured sigma_GC tends to be underestimated by amounts that depend on the intrinsic Vmax/sigma_GC, the number of observed GCs (N_GC), and the velocity uncertainties. The bias is negligible when N_GC>~20. In those cases where a large N_GC is not available, it is imperative to obtain data with small velocity uncertainties. For instance, errors of <2km/s lead to Vmax<10km/s for a system that is intrinsically not rotating.
  • We present a study of the physical properties of the disc and tail of ESO137-001, a galaxy suffering from extreme ram-pressure stripping during its infall into the Norma cluster. With sensitive and spatially-resolved MUSE spectroscopy, we analyse the emission line diagnostics in the tail of ESO137-001, finding high values of [NII]/H$\alpha$ and [OI]/H$\alpha$ that are suggestive of the presence of shocks in turbulent gas. However, the observed line ratios are not as strong as commonly seen in pure shock heating models, suggesting that other emission mechanisms may contribute to the observed emission. Indeed, part of the observed emission, particularly at close separations from the galaxy disc, may originate from recombination of photoionised gas stripped from the main body of ESO137-001. We also identify a large number of bright compact knots within in the tail, with line ratios characteristic of HII regions. These HII regions, despite residing in a stripped gas tail, have quite typical line ratios, densities, temperatures, and metallicity ($\sim0.7$ solar). The majority of these HII regions are embedded within diffuse gas from the tail, which is dynamically cool ($\sigma \sim 25-50\ \rm{km\ s^{-1}}$ ). This fact, together with a lack of appreciable gradients in age and metallicity, suggests that these HII regions formed in situ. While our analysis represents a first attempt to characterise the rich physics of the ESO137-001 tail, future work is needed to address the importance of other mechanisms, such as thermal conduction and magneto hydrodynamic waves, in powering the emission in the tail.
  • We use imaging from the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS) to present a comparative study of ultra-compact dwarf (UCD) galaxies associated with three prominent Virgo sub-clusters: those centered on the massive, red-sequence galaxies M87, M49 and M60. We show how UCDs can be selected with high completeness using a combination of half-light radius and location in color-color diagrams ($u^*iK_s$ or $u^*gz$). Although the central galaxies in each of these sub-clusters have nearly identical luminosities and stellar masses, we find large differences in the sizes of their UCD populations, with M87 containing ~3.5 and 7.8 times more UCDs than M49 and M60, respectively. The relative abundance of UCDs in the three regions scales in proportion to sub-cluster mass, as traced by X-ray gas mass, total gravitating mass, number of globular clusters, and number of nearby galaxies. We find that the UCDs are predominantly blue in color, with ~85% of the UCDs having colors similar to blue GCs and stellar nuclei of dwarf galaxies. We present evidence that UCDs surrounding M87 and M49 may follow a morphological sequence ordered by the prominence of their outer, low surface brightness envelope, ultimately merging with the sequence of nucleated low-mass galaxies, and that envelope prominence correlates with distance from either galaxy. Our analysis provides evidence that tidal stripping of nucleated galaxies is an important process in the formation of UCDs.
  • Neutral hydrogen represents the major observable baryonic constituent of galaxies that fuels the formation of stars through the transformation in molecular hydrogen. The emission of the hydrogen recombination line Halpha is the most direct tracer of the process that transforms gas (fuel) into stars. We continue to present Halpha3 (acronym for Halpha-alpha-alpha), an extensive Halpha+[NII] narrow-band imaging campaign of galaxies selected from the HI Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA), using the instrumentation available at the San Pedro Martir observatory (Mexico). In only four years since 2011 we were able to complete in 48 nights the Halpha imaging observations of 724 galaxies in the region of the Coma supercluster 10^h < R.A. <16^h; 24^o < Dec. <28^o and 3900<cz<9000 kms^{-1}. Of these, 603 are selected from the HI Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA) and constitute a 97% complete sample. They provide for the first time a complete census of the massive star formation properties of local gas-rich galaxies belonging to different environments (cluster vs filaments), morphological type (spirals vs dwarf Irr), over a wide range of stellar mass (10^{8}-10^{11.5} Modot) in the Coma Supercluster. The present Paper V provides the Halpha data and the derived star formation rates for the observed galaxies.
  • We report the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy (NGC6503-d1) during the Subaru extended ultraviolet (XUV) disk survey. It is a likely companion of the spiral galaxy NGC6503. The resolved images, in B, V, R, i, and Halpha, show an irregular appearance due to bright stars with underlying, smooth and unresolved stellar emission. It is classified as the transition type (dIrr/dSph). Its structural properties are similar to those of the dwarfs in the Local Group, with a V absolute magnitude ~ -10.5, half-light radius ~400 pc, and central surface brightness ~25.2. Despite the low stellar surface brightness environment, one HII region was detected, though its Halpha luminosity is low, indicating an absence of any appreciable O-stars at the current epoch. The presence of multiple stellar populations is indicated by the color-magnitude diagram of ~300 bright resolved stars and the total colors of the dwarf, with the majority of its total stellar mass ~4x10^6 Msun in an old stellar population.
  • The origin of ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs)--objects larger and more massive than typical globular clusters (GCs), but more compact than typical dwarf galaxies--has been hotly debated in the 15 years since their discovery. Even whether UCDs should be considered galactic in origin, or simply the most extreme GCs, is not yet settled. We present the dynamical properties of 97 spectroscopically confirmed UCDs (rh >~10 pc) and 911 GCs associated with central cD galaxy of the Virgo cluster, M87. Our UCDs, of which 89% have M_star > ~2X10^6 M_sun and 92% are as blue as the classic blue GCs, nearly triple the sample of previous confirmed Virgo UCDs, providing by far the best opportunity for studying the global dynamics of a UCD system. We found that (1) UCDs have a surface number density profile that is shallower than that of the blue GCs in the inner ~ 70 kpc and as steep as that of the red GCs at larger radii; (2) UCDs exhibit a significantly stronger rotation than the GCs, and the blue GCs seem to have a velocity field that is more consistent with that of the surrounding dwarf ellipticals than with that of UCDs; (3) UCDs have a radially increasing orbital anisotropy profile, and are tangentially-biased at radii < ~ 40 kpc and radially-biased further out. In contrast, the blue GCs become more tangentially-biased at larger radii beyond ~ 40 kpc; (4) GCs with M_star > 2X10^6 M_sun have rotational properties indistinguishable from the less massive ones, suggesting that it is the size, instead of mass, that differentiates UCDs from GCs as kinematically distinct populations. We conclude that most UCDs in M87 are not consistent with being merely the most luminous and extended examples of otherwise normal GCs. The radially-biased orbital structure of UCDs at large radii is in general agreement with the "tidally threshed dwarf galaxy" scenario.
  • With the advent of the next generation wide-field cameras it became possible to survey in an unbiased mode galaxies spanning a variety of local densities, from the core of rich clusters, to compact and loose groups, down to filaments and voids. The sensitivity reached by these instruments allowed to extend the observation to dwarf galaxies, the most "fragile" objects in the universe. At the same time models and simulations have been tailored to quantify the different effects of the environment on the evolution of galaxies. Simulations, models, and observations consistently indicate that star-forming dwarf galaxies entering high-density environments for the first time can be rapidly stripped from their interstellar medium. The lack of gas quenches the activity of star formation, producing on timescales of ${\sim}$1~Gyr quiescent galaxies with spectro-photometric, chemical, structural, and kinematical properties similar to those observed in dwarf early-type galaxies inhabiting rich clusters and loose groups. Simulations and observations consistently identify ram pressure stripping as the major effect responsible for the quenching of the star-formation activity in rich clusters. Gravitational interactions (galaxy harassment) can also be important in groups or in clusters whenever galaxies have been members since early epochs. The observation of clusters at different redshifts combined with the present high infalling rate of galaxies onto clusters indicate that the quenching of the star-formation activity in dwarf systems and the formation of the faint end of the red sequence is a very recent phenomenon.
  • We present three independent catalogs of point-sources extracted from SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 micron as a part of the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). The source positions are determined by estimating the likelihood to be a real source for each peak on the maps and the flux densities are estimated using the sourceExtractorTimeline, a timeline-based point source fitter. Afterwards, each source is subtracted from the maps, removing a Gaussian function in every position with the full width half maximum equal to that estimated in sourceExtractorTimeline. This procedure improves the robustness of our algorithm in terms of source identification. The HeViCS catalogs contain about 52000, 42200, and 18700 sources selected at 250, 350, and 500 micron above 3sigma and are ~ 75%, 62%, and 50% complete at flux densities of 20 mJy at 250, 350, 500 micron, respectively. We then measured source number counts at 250, 350, and 500 micron and we also cross-correlated the catalogs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the redshift distribution of the nearby sources. From this cross-correlation, we select ~2000 sources with reliable fluxes and a high signal-to-noise ratio, finding an average redshift z~0.3+/-0.22. The number counts at 250, 350, and 500 micron show an increase in the slope below 200 mJy, indicating a strong evolution in number of density for galaxies at these fluxes. In general, models tend to overpredict the counts at brighter flux densities, underlying the importance of studying the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the spectral energy distribution to refine the theoretical recipes of the models. Our iterative method for source identification allowed the detection of a family of 500 micron sources that are not foreground objects belonging to Virgo and not found in other catalogs.
  • We present MUSE observations of ESO137-001, a spiral galaxy infalling towards the center of the massive Norma cluster at z~0.0162. During the high-velocity encounter of ESO137-001 with the intracluster medium, a dramatic ram-pressure stripping event gives rise to an extended gaseous tail, traced by our MUSE observations to >30 kpc from the galaxy center. By studying the H-alpha surface brightness and kinematics in tandem with the stellar velocity field, we conclude that ram pressure has completely removed the interstellar medium from the outer disk, while the primary tail is still fed by gas from the inner regions. Gravitational interactions do not appear to be a primary mechanism for gas removal. The stripped gas retains the imprint of the disk rotational velocity to ~20 kpc downstream, without a significant gradient along the tail, which suggests that ESO137-001 is fast moving along a radial orbit in the plane of the sky. Conversely, beyond ~20 kpc, a greater degree of turbulence is seen, with velocity dispersion up to >100 km/s. For a model-dependent infall velocity of ~3000 km/s, we conclude that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the tail occurs on timescales >6.5 Myr. Our work demonstrates the terrific potential of MUSE for detailed studies of how ram-pressure stripping operates on small scales, providing a deep understanding of how galaxies interact with the dense plasma of the cluster environment.
  • We report on a large-scale study of the distribution of globular clusters (GCs) throughout the Virgo cluster, based on photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey, a large imaging survey covering Virgo's primary subclusters to their virial radii. Using the g', (g'-i') color-magnitude diagram of unresolved and marginally-resolved sources, we constructed 2-D maps of the GC distribution. We present the clearest evidence to date showing the difference in concentration between red and blue GCs over the extent of the cluster, where the red (metal-rich) GCs are largely located around the massive early-type galaxies, whilst the blue (metal-poor) GCs have a more extended spatial distribution, with significant populations present beyond 83' (215 kpc) along the major axes of M49 and M87. The GC distribution around M87 and M49 shows remarkable agreement with the shape, ellipticity and boxiness of the diffuse light surrounding both galaxies. We find evidence for spatial enhancements of GCs surrounding M87 that may be indicative of recent interactions or an ongoing merger history. We compare the GC map to the locations of Virgo galaxies and the intracluster X-ray gas, and find good agreement between these baryonic structures. The Virgo cluster contains a total population of 67300$\pm$14400 GCs, of which 35% are located in M87 and M49 alone. We compute a cluster-wide specific frequency S_N,CL=$2.8\pm0.7$, including Virgo's diffuse light. The GC-to-baryonic mass fraction is e_b=$5.7\pm1.1\times10^{-4} $and the GC-to-total cluster mass formation efficiency is e_t=$2.9\pm0.5\times10^{-5}$, values slightly lower than, but consistent with, those derived for individual galactic halos. Our results show that the production of the complex structures in the unrelaxed Virgo cluster core (including the diffuse intracluster light) is an ongoing process.(abridged)
  • Context: Dust reprocesses about half of the stellar radiation in galaxies. The thermal re-emission by dust of absorbed energy is considered driven merely by young stars and, consequently, often applied to trace the star formation rate in galaxies. Recent studies have argued that the old stellar population might anticipate a non-negligible fraction of the radiative dust heating. Aims: In this work, we aim to analyze the contribution of young (< 100 Myr) and old (~ 10 Gyr) stellar populations to radiative dust heating processes in the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M51 using radiative transfer modeling. High-resolution 3D radiative transfer (RT) models are required to describe the complex morphologies of asymmetric spiral arms and clumpy star-forming regions and model the propagation of light through a dusty medium. Methods: In this paper, we present a new technique developed to model the radiative transfer effects in nearby face-on galaxies. We construct a high-resolution 3D radiative transfer model with the Monte-Carlo code SKIRT accounting for the absorption, scattering and non-local thermal equilibrium (NLTE) emission of dust in M51. The 3D distribution of stars is derived from the 2D morphology observed in the IRAC 3.6 {\mu}m, GALEX FUV, H{\alpha} and MIPS 24 {\mu}m wavebands, assuming an exponential vertical distribution with an appropriate scale height. The dust geometry is constrained through the far-ultraviolet (FUV) attenuation, which is derived from the observed total-infrared-to-far-ultraviolet luminosity ratio. The stellar luminosity, star formation rate and dust mass have been scaled to reproduce the observed stellar spectral energy distribution (SED), FUV attenuation and infrared SED. (abridged)
  • In this paper we present a catalogue of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) in the Andromeda (M31) galaxy extracted from the Hershel Exploitation of Local Galaxy Andromeda (HELGA) dataset. GMCs are identified from the Herschel maps using a hierarchical source extraction algorithm. We present the results of this new catalogue and characterise the spatial distribution and spectral energy properties of its clouds based on the radial dust/gas properties found by Smith et al (2012). 236 GMCs in the mass range 10^4-10^7 M_sol are identified, their cumulative mass distribution is found to be proportional to M^-1.45 in agreement with earlier studies. The GMCs appear to follow the same cloud mass to L_CO correlation observed in the Milky Way. However, comparison between this catalogue and interferometry studies also shows that the GMCs are substructured below the Herschel resolution limit suggesting that we are observing associations of GMCs. Following Gordon et al. (2006), we study the spatial structure of M31 by splitting the observed structure into a set of spiral arms and offset rings. We fit radii of 10.5 and 15.5 kpc to the two most prominent rings. We then fit a logarithmic spiral with a pitch angle of 8.9 deg to the GMCs not associated with either ring. Lastly, we comment upon the effects of deprojection on our results and investigate the effect different models for M31's inclination will have upon the projection of an unperturbed spiral arm system.
  • In this paper we introduce the deepest and most extensive ultraviolet extragalactic source catalogs of the Virgo Cluster area to date. Archival and targeted GALEX imaging is compiled and combined to provide the deepest possible coverage over ~120 deg^2 in the NUV (lambda_eff=2316 angstroms) and ~40 deg^2 in the FUV (lambda_eff=1539 angstroms) between 180 deg <= R.A. <= 195 deg and 0 deg <= Decl. <= 20 deg. We measure the integrated photometry of 1770 extended UV sources of all galaxy types and use GALEX pipeline photometry for 1,230,855 point-like sources in the foreground, within, and behind the cluster. Extended source magnitudes are reliable to m_UV ~22, showing ~0.01 sigma difference from their asymptotic magnitudes. Point-like source magnitudes have a 1 sigma standard deviation within ~0.2 mag down to m_uv ~23. The point-like source catalog is cross-matched with large optical databases and surveys including the SDSS DR9 (> 1 million Virgo Cluster sources), the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS; >13 million Virgo Cluster sources), and the NED (~30,000 sources in the Virgo Cluster). We find 69% of the entire UV point-like source catalog has a unique optical counterpart, 11% of which are stars and 129 are Virgo cluster members neither in the VCC nor part of the bright CGCG galaxy catalog (i.e., m_pg < 14.5). These data are collected in four catalogs containing the UV extended sources, the UV point-like sources, and two catalogs each containing the most relevant optical parameters of UV-optically matched point-like sources for further studies from SDSS and NGVS. The GUViCS catalogs provide a unique set of data for future works on UV and multiwavelength studies in the cluster and background environments.
  • We analyze the applicability of far-infrared fine-structure lines [CII] 158 micron, [OI] 63 micron and [OIII] 88 micron to reliably trace the star formation rate (SFR) in a sample of low-metallicity dwarf galaxies from the Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey and compare with a broad sample of galaxies of various types and metallicities in the literature. We study the trends and scatter in the relation between the SFR (as traced by GALEX FUV and MIPS 24 micron) and far-infrared line emission, on spatially resolved and global galaxy scales, in dwarf galaxies. We assemble far-infrared line measurements from the literature and infer whether the far-infrared lines can probe the SFR (as traced by the total-infrared luminosity) in a variety of galaxy populations. In metal-poor dwarfs, the [OI] and [OIII] lines show the strongest correlation with the SFR with an uncertainty on the SFR estimates better than a factor of 2, while the link between [CII] emission and the SFR is more dispersed (uncertainty factor of 2.6). The increased scatter in the SFR-L([CII]) relation towards low metal abundances, warm dust temperatures, large filling factors of diffuse, highly ionized gas suggests that other cooling lines start to dominate depending on the density and ionization state of the gas. For the literature sample, we evaluate the correlations for a number of different galaxy populations. The [CII] and [OI] lines are considered to be reliable SFR tracers in starburst galaxies, recovering the star formation activity within an uncertainty of factor 2. [Abridged]
  • We present the refurbished GOLDMine galaxy site (http://goldmine.mib.infn.it) superseding the one operating since 2002 (Gavazzi et al. 2003). Data for 9704 galaxies selected with r<17.7 mag from the SDSS, belonging to the Cancer cluster, Local supercluster, Coma supercluster, Hercules, A2197 and A2199 clusters are included.