• e-ASTROGAM is a gamma-ray space mission proposed for the fifth Medium-size mission (M5) of the European Space Agency. It is dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from ~0.15 MeV to 3 GeV with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, together with a groundbreaking capability for gamma-ray polarimetric measurements. We discuss here the main polarization results expected from e-ASTROGAM observations of active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, microquasars, and the Crab pulsar and nebula. The anticipated performance of the proposed observatory for polarimetry is illustrated by simulations of the polarization signals expected from various sources. We show that polarimetric analyses with e-ASTROGAM should provide definitive insight into the geometry, magnetization and content of the high-energy plasmas found in the emitting sources, as well as on the processes of radiation of these plasmas.
  • e-ASTROGAM (`enhanced ASTROGAM') is a breakthrough Observatory mission dedicated to the study of the non-thermal Universe in the photon energy range from 0.3 MeV to 3 GeV. The mission is based on an advanced space-proven detector technology, with unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution, combined with polarimetric capability. In the largely unexplored MeV-GeV domain, e-ASTROGAM will open a new window on the non-thermal Universe, making pioneering observations of the most powerful Galactic and extragalactic sources, elucidating the nature of their relativistic outflows and their effects on Galactic ecosystems. With a line sensitivity in the MeV energy range one to two orders of magnitude better than previous generation instruments, will determine the origin of key isotopes fundamental for the understanding of supernova explosion and the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. The mission will provide unique data of significant interest to a broad astronomical community, complementary to powerful observatories such as LIGO-Virgo-GEO600-KAGRA, SKA, ALMA, E-ELT, TMT, LSST, JWST, Athena, CTA, IceCube, KM3NeT, and the promise of eLISA. Keywords: High-energy gamma-ray astronomy, High-energy astrophysics, Nuclear Astrophysics, Compton and Pair creation telescope, Gamma-ray bursts, Active Galactic Nuclei, Jets, Outflows, Multiwavelength observations of the Universe, Counterparts of gravitational waves, Fermi, Dark Matter, Nucleosynthesis, Early Universe, Supernovae, Cosmic Rays, Cosmic antimatter.
  • e-ASTROGAM is a space mission with unprecedented sensitivity to photons in the MeV range, proposed within the ESA M5 call. In this note we describe some measurements sensitive to axion-like particles, for which performance in the MeV/GeV range is of primary importance, and e-ASTROGAM could be the key for discovery. Keywords: Axions. ALPs. Dark-matter candidates. Gamma-ray astrophysics.
  • High-energy photons (above the MeV) are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for cosmic gamma rays, at ground (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS, HAWC) and in space (AGILE, Fermi). This presentation reviews the present status of the studies of fundamental physics problems with high-energy gamma rays, and discusses the expected experimental developments.
  • In the last few years, the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes have detected more than 40 blazars in the very-high-energy range (VHE, 100 GeV - 100 TeV). During their trip to us, the VHE photons undergo an energy-dependent absorption by scattering off the infrared/optical/ultraviolet photons of the EBL, which is produced by galaxies during the whole cosmic evolution. Actually, both the observed spectra and the emitted ones predicted by conventional VHE photon emission models have a simple power-law behavior to a good approximation. Surprisingly, the emitted slope distribution {{\Gamma}em (z)} distribution exhibits a correlation with z, since the associated best-fit regression line is a decreasing function of z, leading blazars with harder spectra to be found only at larger redshift. It is very difficult to imagine an intrinsic mechanism which could lead to this spectral variation within conventional physics, given the fact that neither cosmological evolutionary effects nor observational selection effects can explain it. Things are quite different in the presence of axion-like particles (ALPs). We show that photon-ALP oscillations occurring in extragalactic magnetic fields yield, for a realistic choice of the parameters, a {{\Gamma}em (z)} distribution whose best-fit regression line becomes amazingly redshift-independent -- indeed in agreement with the physical intuition -- and so the above problems disappear. This is evidently a highly nontrivial fact, which therefore provides preliminary evidence for the existence of ALPs. Moreover, a new scenario for VHE blazars emerges, wherein all values of {{\Gamma}em (z)} fall within a small strip about the horizontal best-fit regression line in the {\Gamma}em - z plane, and the large scatter of the observed values of the slope arises from the large spread of the blazar redshifts.
  • The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the the next generation facility of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes; two sites will cover both hemispheres. CTA will reach unprecedented sensitivity, energy and angular resolution in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. Each CTA array will include four Large Size Telescopes (LSTs), designed to cover the low-energy range of the CTA sensitivity ($\sim$20 GeV to 200 GeV). In the baseline LST design, the focal-plane camera will be instrumented with 265 photodetector clusters; each will include seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with an entrance window of 1.5 inches in diameter. The PMT design is based on mature and reliable technology. Recently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are emerging as a competitor. Currently, SiPMs have advantages (e.g. lower operating voltage and tolerance to high illumination levels) and disadvantages (e.g. higher capacitance and cross talk rates), but this technology is still young and rapidly evolving. SiPM technology has a strong potential to become superior to the PMT one in terms of photon detection efficiency and price per square mm of detector area. While the advantage of SiPMs has been proven for high-density, small size cameras, it is yet to be demonstrated for large area cameras such as the one of the LST. We are working to develop a SiPM-based module for the LST camera, in view of a possible camera upgrade. We will describe the solutions we are exploring in order to balance a competitive performance with a minimal impact on the overall LST camera design.
  • Due to fundamental limitations of accelerators, only cosmic rays can give access to centre-of- mass energies more than one order of magnitude above those reached at the LHC. In fact, extreme energy cosmic rays (1018 eV - 1020 eV) are the only possibility to explore the 100 TeV energy scale in the years to come. This leap by one order of magnitude gives a unique way to open new horizons: new families of particles, new physics scales, in-depth investigations of the Lorentz symmetries. However, the flux of cosmic rays decreases rapidly, being less than one particle per square kilometer per year above 1019 eV: one needs to sample large surfaces. A way to develop large-effective area, low cost, detectors, is to build a solar panel-based device which can be used in parallel for power generation and Cherenkov light detection. Using solar panels for Cherenkov light detection would combine power generation and a non-standard detection device.
  • Summer vacations in the Dolomites were a tradition among the professors of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Roma since the end of the XIX century. Beyond the academic walls, people like Tullio Levi-Civita, Federigo Enriques and Ugo Amaldi sr., together with their families, were meeting friends and colleagues in Cortina, San Vito, Dobbiaco, Vigo di Fassa and Selva, enjoying trekking together with scientific discussions. The tradition was transmitted to the next generations, in particular in the first half of the XX century, and the group of via Panisperna was directly connected: Edoardo Amaldi, the son of the mathematician Ugo sr., rented at least during two summers, in 1925 and in 1949, and in the winter of 1960, a house in San Vito di Cadore, and almost every year in the Dolomites; Enrico Fermi was a frequent guest. Many important steps in modern physics, in particular the development of the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Fermi theory of beta decay, are related to scientific discussions held in the region of the Dolomites.
  • Using the most recent observational data concerning the Extragalactic Background Light and the Radio Background, for a source at a redshift z_s < 3 we compute the energy E_0 of an observed gamma-ray photon in the range 10 GeV < E_0 < 10^13 GeV such that the resulting optical depth tau_gamma(E_0,z_s) takes the values 1, 2, 3 and 4.6, corresponding to an observed flux dimming of e^-1 = 0.37, e^-2 = 0.14, e^-3 = 0.05 and e^-4.6 = 0.01, respectively. Below a source distance D = 8 kpc we find that tau_gamma(E_0,DH_0/c) < 1 for any value of E_0. In the limiting case of a local Universe (z_s = 0) we compare our result with the one derived in 1997 by Coppi and Aharonian. The present achievement is of paramount relevance for the planned ground-based detectors like CTA, HAWC and HiSCORE.
  • Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of ALPs, which are very light spin-zero bosons with a two-photon coupling. Photon-ALP oscillations occur in the presence of an external magnetic field, and ALPs can lead to observable effects on the measured photon spectrum of astrophysical sources. An intriguing situation arises when blazars are observed with the Cherenkov Telescopes H.E.S.S., MAGIC, CANGAROO III and VERITAS. The extragalactic background light (EBL) produced by galaxies during cosmic evolution gives rise to a source dimming which becomes important in the VHE band. This dimming can be considerably reduced by photon-ALP oscillations in the large-scale magnetic fields, and the resulting blazar spectra become harder than expected. We find that for ALPs lighter than 5 x 10^{-10} eV the photon survival probability is larger than predicted by conventional physics above a few hundred GeV. This is a clear-cut prediction which can be tested with the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array and HAWC. Moreover, we offer a new interpretation of the VHE blazars detected so far, according to which the large spread in the values of the observed spectral index is mainly due to the wide spread in the source distances rather than to large variations of their internal physical properties.
  • The discovery of cosmic rays, a milestone in science, was based on the work by scientists in Europe and the New World and took place during a period characterised by nationalism and lack of communication. Many scientists that took part in this research a century ago were intrigued by the penetrating radiation and tried to understand the origin of it. Several important contributions to the discovery of the origin of cosmic rays have been forgotten; historical, political and personal facts might have contributed to their substantial disappearance from the history of science.
  • Several extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of Axion-Like Particles (ALPs), very light spin-zero bosons with a two-photon coupling. ALPs can give rise to observable effects in very-high-energy astrophysics. Above roughly 100 GeV the horizon of the observable Universe progressively shrinks as the energy increases, due to scattering of beam photons off background photons in the optical and infrared bands, which produces e+e- pairs. In the presence of large-scale magnetic fields photons emitted by a blazar can oscillate into ALPs on the way to us and back into photons before reaching the Earth. Since ALPs do not interact with background photons, the effective mean free path of beam photons increases, enhancing the photon survival probability. While the absorption probability increases with energy, photon-ALP oscillations are energy-independent, and so the survival probability increases with energy compared to standard expectations. We have performed a systematic analysis of this effect, interpreting the present data on very-high-energy photons from blazars. Our predictions can be tested with presently operating Cherenkov Telescopes like H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS and CANGAROO III as well as with detectors like ARGO-YBJ and MILAGRO and with the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array and the HAWC-ray observatory. ALPs with the right properties to produce the above effects can possibly be discovered by the GammeV experiment at FERMILAB and surely by the planned photon regeneration experiment ALPS at DESY.
  • On March 28, Swift's Burst Alert Telescope discovered a source in the constellation Draco when it erupted in a series of X-ray blasts. The explosion, catalogued as gamma-ray burst (GRB) 110328A, repeatedly flared in the following days, making the interpretation of the event as a GRB unlikely. Here we suggest that the event could be due to the tidal disruption of a star that approaches the pericentric distance of a black hole, and we use this fact to derive bounds on the physical characteristics of such system, based on the variability timescales and energetics of the observed X-ray emission.
  • High-energy photons are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the most violent phenomena in the universe has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays (above 100 GeV). Ground-based detectors like the Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS) recently discovered more than 80 new sources. This talk reviews the present status of VHE gamma astrophysics, with emphasis on the recent results and on the experimental developments, keeping an eye on the future. The impact on fundamental physics and on cosmic-ray physics is emphasized.
  • During a series of experiments performed between 1907 and 1911, Domenico Pacini (Marino 1878-Roma 1934), at that time researcher at the Central Bureau of Meteorology and Geodynamics in Roma, studied the origin of the radiation today called "cosmic rays", the nature of which was unknown at that time. In his conclusive measurements in June 1911 at the Naval Academy in Livorno, and confirmed in Bracciano a couple of months later, Pacini, proposing a novel experimental technique, observed the radiation strength to decrease when going from the surface to a few meters underwater (both in the sea and in the lake), thus demonstrating that such radiation could not come from the Earth's crust. Pacini's work was largely overlooked. Hess was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1936, two years after the death of Pacini, who had become a full professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Bari. The discovery of cosmic rays -a milestone in science- involved several scientists in Europe and in the United States of America and took place during a period characterized by nationalism and lack of communication. Historical, political and personal facts, embedded in the pre- and post-World War I context, might have contributed to the substantial disappearance of Pacini from the history of science. This article aims to give an unbiased historical account of the discovery of cosmic rays; in the centenary of Pacini's pioneering experiments, his work, which employed a technique that was complementary to, and independent of that of Hess, will be duly taken into consideration. A translation into English of three fundamental early articles by Pacini is provided in the Appendix.
  • At the beginning of the twentieth century, two scientists, the Austrian Victor Hess and the Italian Domenico Pacini, developed two brilliant lines of research independently, leading to the determination of the origin of atmospheric radiation. Hess measured the rate of discharge of an electroscope that flew aboard an atmospheric balloon. Because the discharge rate increased as the balloon flew at higher altitude, he concluded in 1912 that the origin could not be terrestrial. For this discovery, Hess was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1936, and his experiment became legendary. At the same time, in 1911, Pacini, a professor at the University of Bari, made a series of measurements to determine the variation in the speed of discharge of an electroscope (and thus the intensity of the radiation) while the electroscope was immersed in a box in a sea near the Naval Academy in the Bay of Livorno (the Italian Navy supported the research). Pacini discovered that the discharge of the oscilloscope was significantly slower than at the surface. Before his conclusive measurements, Pacini performed a series of experiments between 1907 and 1910, in particular by comparing radioactivity on ground and on the sea surface a few kilometers off the coast. These experimennts gave marginal indications on the presence of a non-terrestrial component, encouraging Pacini to continue his research till the conclusive results. Such first experiments on the sea are presented in the article by D. Pacini in Le Radium VIII (1911) 307, which is essentially a translation into French of another article published in Italian in Ann. Uff. Centr. Meteor. XXXII, parte I (1910); this is a translation in English of the article by Pacini in "Le Radium", article which was quoted by Hess in his famous paper.
  • Observations with the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes H.E.S.S., MAGIC, CANGAROO III and VERITAS have shown that the Universe is more transparent than expected to gamma rays above 100GeV. As a natural explanation, the DARMA scenario has previously been proposed, wherein photons can oscillate into a new very light axionlike particle and vice-versa in the presence of cosmic magnetic fields. Here we demonstrate that the most recent observations further support the DARMA scenario, thereby making the existence of a very light axion-like particle more likely.
  • The discovery of cosmic rays, a milestone in science, comprised scientists in Europe and the US and took place during a period characterised by nationalism and lack of communication. Many scientists that took part in this research a century ago were intrigued by the penetrating radiation and tried to understand the origin of it. Several important contributions to the discovery of the origin of cosmic rays have been forgotten and in particular that of Domenico Pacini, who in June 1911 demonstrated by studying the decrease of radioactivity with an electroscope immersed in water that cosmic rays could not come from the crust of the Earth. Several historical, political and personal facts might have contributed to the substantial disappearance of Pacini from the history of science.
  • From the study of a sample of about 62.3 million well reconstructed K0S decays recorded by the KLOE detector at the DAFNE accelerator in Frascati, the lifetimes of K0S mesons parallel and antiparallel to the direction of motion of the Earth with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background reference frame have been studied. No difference has been found, and a limit on a possible asymmetry of the lifetime with respect to the CMB has been set at 95% C.L.: A < 0.98 x 10-3. This is presently the best experimental limit on such quantity, and it is smaller of the speed, expressed in natural units, of the Solar System with respect to the CMB. The present limit might constrain possible Lorentz-violating anisotropical theories.
  • About a century ago, cosmic rays were identified as being a source of radiation on Earth. The proof came from two independent experiments. The Italian physicist Domenico Pacini observed the radiation strength to decrease when going from the ground to a few meters underwater (both in a lake and in a sea). At about the same time, in a balloon flight, the Austrian Victor Hess found the ionization rate to increase with height. The present article attempts to give an unbiased historical account of the discovery of cosmic rays -- and in doing so it will duly account for Pacini's pioneering work, which involved a technique that was complementary to, and independent from, Hess'. Personal stories, and the pre- and post-war historical context, led Pacini's work to slip into oblivion.
  • Recent observations by H.E.S.S. and MAGIC strongly suggest that the Universe is more transparent to very-high-energy gamma rays than previously thought. We show that this fact can be reconciled with standard blazar emission models provided that photon oscillations into a very light Axion-Like Particle occur in extragalactic magnetic fields. A quantitative estimate of this effect indeed explains the observed data and in particular the spectrum of blazar 3C279.
  • Early indications by H.E.S.S. and the subsequent detection of blazar 3C279 by MAGIC show that the Universe is more transparent to very-high-energy gamma rays than previously thought. We demonstrate that this circumstance can be reconciled with standard blazar emission models provided that photon oscillations into a very light Axion-Like Particle occur in extragalactic magnetic fields. A quantitative estimate of this effect indeed explains the observed spectrum of 3C279. Our prediction can be tested by the satellite-borne Fermi/LAT detector as well as by the ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes H.E.S.S., MAGIC, CANGAROO III, VERITAS and by the Extensive Air Shower arrays ARGO-YBJ and MILAGRO.
  • An anomalously large transparency of the Universe to gamma rays has recently been discovered by the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) H.E.S.S. and MAGIC. We show that observations can be reconciled with standard blazar emission models provided photon oscillations into a very light Axion-Like Particle occur in extragalactic magnetic fields. A quantitative estimate of this effect is successfully applied to the blazar 3C279. Our prediction can be tested with the satellite-borne Fermi/LAT detector as well as with the ground-based IACTs H.E.S.S., MAGIC, CANGAROOIII, VERITAS and the Extensive Air Shower arrays ARGO-YBJ andMILAGRO. Our result also offers an important observational test for models of dark energy wherein quintessence is coupled to the photon through an effective dimension-five operator.
  • High-energy photons are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the most violent phenomena in the Universe has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for high-energy gamma-rays. Observation of gamma-rays gives an exciting view of the high-energy universe thanks to satellite-based telescopes (AGILE, GLAST) and to ground-based detectors like the Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S. and MAGIC in particular), which recently discovered more than 60 new very-high-energy sources. The progress achieved with the last generation of Cherenkov telescopes is comparable to the one drawn by EGRET with respect to the previous gamma-ray satellite detectors. This article reviews the present status of high-energy gamma astrophysics, with emphasis on the recent results and on the experimental developments.
  • A recent article from the Pierre Auger Collaboration links the direction of charged cosmic rays to possible extragalactic sites of emission. The correlation of the direction of such particles with the direction of the emitter allows constraining the value of large-scale magnetic fields B. Assuming for B a coherence length in the range between 1 Mpc and 10 Mpc, we find values of B between 0.3 and 0.9 nG.