• Unexpected clustering in the orbital elements of minor bodies beyond the Kuiper belt has led to speculations that our solar system actually hosts nine planets, the eight established plus a hypothetical "Planet Nine". Several recent studies have shown that a planet with a mass of about 10 Earth masses on a distant eccentric orbit with perihelion far beyond the Kuiper belt could create and maintain this clustering. The evolutionary path resulting in an orbit such as the one suggested for Planet Nine is nevertheless not easily explained. Here we investigate whether a planet scattered away from the giant-planet region could be lifted to an orbit similar to the one suggested for Planet Nine through dynamical friction with a cold, distant planetesimal belt. Recent simulations of planetesimal formation via the streaming instability suggest that planetesimals can readily form beyond 100au. We explore this circularisation by dynamical friction with a set of numerical simulations. We find that a planet that is scattered from the region close to Neptune onto an eccentric orbit has a 20-30% chance of obtaining an orbit similar to that of Planet Nine after 4.6Gyr. Our simulations also result in strong or partial clustering of the planetesimals; however, whether or not this clustering is observable depends on the location of the inner edge of the planetesimal belt. If the inner edge is located at 200au the degree of clustering amongst observable objects is significant.
  • The star EPIC 210894022 has been identified from a light curve acquired through the K2 space mission as possibly orbited by a transiting planet. Our aim is to confirm the planetary nature of the object and derive its fundamental parameters. We combine the K2 photometry with reconnaissance spectroscopy and radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained using three separate telescope and spectrograph combinations. The spectroscopic synthesis package SME has been used to derive the stellar photospheric parameters that were used as input to various stellar evolutionary tracks in order to derive the parameters of the system. The planetary transit was also validated to occur on the assumed host star through adaptive imaging and statistical analysis. The star is found to be located in the background of the Hyades cluster at a distance at least 4 times further away from Earth than the cluster itself. The spectrum and the space velocities of EPIC 210894022 strongly suggest it to be a member of the thick disk population. We find that the star is a metal poor ([Fe/H]=-0.53+/-0.05 dex) and alpha-rich somewhat evolved solar-like object of spectral type G3 with Teff=5730+/-50 K, logg=4.15+/-0.1 (cgs), radius of 1.3+/-0.1 R_Sun, and mass of 0.88+/-0.02 M_Sun. The RV detection together with the imaging confirms with a high level of significance that the transit signature is caused by a super-Earth orbiting the star EPIC 210894022. We measure a mass of 8.6+/-3.9 M_Earth and a radius of 1.9+/-0.2 R_Earth. A second more massive object with a period longer than about 120 days is indicated by a long term linear acceleration. With an age of > 10 Gyrs this system is one of the oldest where planets is hitherto detected. Further studies of this planetary system is important since it contains information about the planetary formation process during a very early epoch of the history of our Galaxy.
  • Validated planet candidates need not lie on long-term stable orbits, and instability triggered by post-main-sequence stellar evolution can generate architectures which transport rocky material to white dwarfs, polluting them. The giant planet HD 131399Ab orbits its parent A star at a projected separation of about 50-100 au. The host star, HD 131399A, is part of a hierarchical triple with HD 131399BC being a close binary separated by a few hundred au from the A star. Here, we determine the fate of this system, and find that (i) stability along the main sequence is achieved only for a favourable choice of parameters within the errors, and (ii) even for this choice, in almost every instance the planet is ejected during the transition between the giant branch and white dwarf phases of HD 131399A. This result provides an example of both how the free-floating planet population may be enhanced by similar systems, and how instability can manifest in the polluted white dwarf progenitor population.
  • Following the recent discovery of the first radial velocity planet in a star still possessing a protoplanetary disc (CI Tau), we examine the origin of the planet's eccentricity (e $\sim 0.3$). We show through long timescale ($10^5$ orbits) simulations that the planetary eccentricity can be pumped by the disc, even when its local surface density is well below the threshold previously derived from short timescale integrations. We show that the disc may be able to excite the planet's orbital eccentricity in $<$ a Myr for the system parameters of CI Tau. We also perform two planet scattering experiments and show that alternatively the observed planet may plausibly have acquired its eccentricity through dynamical scattering of a migrating lower mass planet, which has either been ejected from the system or swallowed by the central star. In the latter case the present location and eccentricity of the observed planet can be recovered if it was previously stalled within the disc's magnetospheric cavity.
  • We investigate the prospects for the capture of the proposed Planet 9 from other stars in the Sun's birth cluster. Any capture scenario must satisfy three conditions: the encounter must be more distant than ~150 au to avoid perturbing the Kuiper belt; the other star must have a wide-orbit planet (a>~100au); the planet must be captured onto an appropriate orbit to sculpt the orbital distribution of wide-orbit Solar System bodies. Here we use N-body simulations to show that these criteria may be simultaneously satisfied. In a few percent of slow close encounters in a cluster, bodies are captured onto heliocentric, Planet 9-like orbits. During the ~100 Myr cluster phase, many stars are likely to host planets on highly-eccentric orbits with apastron distances beyond 100 au if Neptune-sized planets are common and susceptible to planet--planet scattering. While the existence of Planet 9 remains unproven, we consider capture from one of the Sun's young brethren a plausible route to explain such an object's orbit. Capture appears to predict a large population of Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) whose orbits are aligned with the captured planet, and we propose that different formation mechanisms will be distinguishable based on their imprint on the distribution of TNOs.
  • We know that planetary systems are just as common around white dwarfs as around main sequence stars. However, self-consistently linking a planetary system across these two phases of stellar evolution through the violent giant branch poses computational challenges, and previous studies restricted architectures to equal-mass planets. Here, we remove this constraint and perform over 450 numerical integrations over a Hubble time (14 Gyr) of packed planetary systems with unequal-mass planets. We characterize the resulting trends as a function of planet order and mass. We find that intrusive radial incursions in the vicinity of the white dwarf become less likely as the dispersion amongst planet masses increases. The orbital meandering which may sustain a sufficiently dynamic environment around a white dwarf to explain observations is more dependent on the presence of terrestrial-mass planets than any variation in planetary mass. Triggering unpacking or instability during the white dwarf phase is comparably easy for systems of unequal-mass planets and systems of equal-mass planets; instabilities during the giant branch phase remain rare and require fine-tuning of initial conditions. We list the key dynamical features of each simulation individually as a potential guide for upcoming discoveries.
  • The space mission PLATO will usher in a new era of exoplanetary science by expanding our current inventory of transiting systems and constraining host star ages, which are currently highly uncertain. This capability might allow PLATO to detect changes in planetary system architecture with time, particularly because planetary scattering due to Lagrange instability may be triggered long after the system was formed. Here, we utilize previously published instability timescale prescriptions to determine PLATO's capability to detect a trend of decreasing planet frequency with age for systems with equal-mass planets. For two-planet systems, our results demonstrate that PLATO may detect a trend for planet masses which are at least as massive as super-Earths. For systems with three or more planets, we link their initial compactness to potentially detectable frequency trends in order to aid future investigations when these populations will be better characterized.
  • Hot Jupiters are giant planets on orbits a few hundredths of an AU. They do not share their system with low-mass close-in planets, despite these latter being exceedingly common. Two migration channels for hot Jupiters have been proposed: through a protoplanetary gas disc or by tidal circularisation of highly-eccentric planets. We show that highly-eccentric giant planets that will become hot Jupiters clear out any low-mass inner planets in the system, explaining the observed lack of such companions to hot Jupiters. A less common outcome of the interaction is that the giant planet is ejected by the inner planets. Furthermore, the interaction can implant giant planets on moderately-high eccentricities at semimajor axes $<1$ AU, a region otherwise hard to populate. Our work supports the hypothesis that most hot Jupiters reached their current orbits following a phase of high eccentricity, possibly excited by other planetary or stellar companions.
  • Close-in planets are in jeopardy as their host stars evolve off the main sequence to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5--2\Mso ), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity, on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and Red Giants. We find that planet engulfment during the Red Giant Branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar mass and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created, that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from main sequence stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.
  • Long-term instability in multi-planet exosystems is a crucial consideration when confirming putative candidates, analyzing exoplanet populations, constraining the age of exosystems, and identifying the sources of white dwarf pollution. Two planets which are Hill stable are separated by a wide-enough distance to ensure that they will never collide. However, Hill stable planetary systems may eventually manifest Lagrange instability when the outer planet escapes or the inner planet collides with the star. We show empirically that for two nearly coplanar Hill stable planets with eccentricities less than about 0.3, instability can manifest itself only after a time corresponding to X initial orbits of the inner planet, where log_{10}(X) is of the order of 5.2 mu^{-0.18} and mu is the planet-star mass ratio measured in (Jupiter mass/Solar mass). This relation applies to any type of equal-mass secondaries, and suggests that two low-eccentricity Hill stable terrestrial-mass or smaller-mass planets should be Lagrange stable throughout the main sequence lifetime of any white dwarf progenitor. However, Hill stable giant planets are not guaranteed to be Lagrange stable, particularly within a few tens of percent beyond the critical Hill separation. Our scaling represents a useful "rule of thumb" for planetary population syntheses or individual systems for which performing detailed long-term integrations is unfeasible.
  • Exoplanets have been observed at many stages of their host star's life, including the main sequence (MS), subgiant and red giant branch stages. Also, polluted white dwarfs (WDs) likely represent dynamically active systems at late times. Here, we perform 3-body simulations which include realistic post-MS stellar mass loss and span the entire lifetime of exosystems with two massive planets, from the endpoint of formation to several Gyr into the WD phase of the host star. We find that both MS and WD systems experience ejections and star-planet collisions (Lagrange instability) even if the planet-planet separation well-exceeds the analytical orbit-crossing (Hill instability) boundary. Consequently, MS-stable planets do not need to be closely-packed to experience instability during the WD phase. This instability may pollute the WD directly through collisions, or, more likely, indirectly through increased scattering of smaller bodies such as asteroids or comets. Our simulations show that this instability occurs predominately between tens of Myr to a few Gyrs of WD cooling.
  • The orbit of a planet is surrounded by a chaotic zone wherein nearby particles' orbits are chaotic and unstable. Wisdom (1980) showed that the chaos is driven by the overlap of mean motion resonances which occurs within a distance (da/a)_chaos = 1.3 mu^2/7 of the planet's orbit. However, the width of mean motion resonances grows with the particles' eccentricity, which will increase the width of the chaotic zone at higher eccentricities. Here we investigate the width of the chaotic zone using the iterated encounter map and N-body integrations. We find that the classical prescription works well for particles on low-eccentricity orbits. However, above a critical eccentricity, dependent upon the mass of the planet, the width of the chaotic zone increases with eccentricity. An extension of Wisdom's analytical arguments then shows that, above the critical eccentricity, the chaotic zone width is given by (da/a)_chaos = 1.8 e^1/5 mu^1/5, which agrees well with the encounter map results. The critical eccentricity is given by e_cr = 0.21 mu^3/7. This extended chaotic zone results in a larger cleared region when a planet sculpts the inner edge of a debris disc comprised of eccentric planetesimals. Hence, the planet mass estimated from the classical chaotic zone may be erroneous. We apply this result to the HR8799 system, showing that the masses of HR8799b inferred from the truncation of the disc may vary by up to 50% depending on the disc particles' eccentricities. With a disc edge at 90AU, the necessary mass of planet b to cause the truncation would be 8-10 Jovian masses if the disc particles have low eccentricities (<0.02), but only 4-8 Jovian masses if the disc particles have higher eccentricities. Our result also has implications for the ability of a planet to feed material into an inner system, a process which may explain metal pollution in White Dwarf atmospheres.
  • Mounting discoveries of extrasolar planets orbiting post-main sequence stars motivate studies aimed at understanding the fate of these planets. In the traditional "adiabatic" approximation, a secondary's eccentricity remains constant during stellar mass loss. Here, we remove this approximation, investigate the full two-body point-mass problem with isotropic mass loss, and illustrate the resulting dynamical evolution. The magnitude and duration of a star's mass loss combined with a secondary's initial orbital characteristics might provoke ejection, modest eccentricity pumping, or even circularisation of the orbit. We conclude that Oort clouds and wide-separation planets may be dynamically ejected from 1-7 Solar-mass parent stars during AGB evolution. The vast majority of planetary material which survives a supernova from a 7-20 Solar-mass progenitor will be dynamically ejected from the system, placing limits on the existence of first-generation pulsar planets. Planets around >20 Solar-mass black hole progenitors may easily survive or readily be ejected depending on the core collapse and superwind models applied. Material ejected during stellar evolution might contribute significantly to the free-floating planetary population.
  • Mean motion resonances are a common feature of both our own Solar System and of extrasolar planetary systems. Bodies can be trapped in resonance when their orbital semi-major axes change, for instance when they migrate through a protoplanetary disc. We use a Hamiltonian model to thoroughly investigate the capture behaviour for first and second order resonances. Using this method, all resonances of the same order can be described by one equation, with applications to specific resonances by appropriate scaling. We focus on the limit where one body is a massless test particle and the other a massive planet. We quantify how the the probability of capture into a resonance depends on the relative migration rate of the planet and particle, and the particle's eccentricity. Resonant capture fails for high migration rates, and has decreasing probability for higher eccentricities. More massive planets can capture particles at higher eccentricities and migration rates. We also calculate libration amplitudes and the offset of the libration centres for captured particles, and the change in eccentricity if capture does not occur. Libration amplitudes are higher for larger initial eccentricity. The model allows for a complete description of a particle's behaviour as it successively encounters several resonances. We discuss implications for several scenarios: (i) Planet migration through gas discs trapping other planets or planetesimals in resonances. (ii) Planet migration through a debris disc. (iii) Dust migration through PR drag. The Hamiltonian model will allow quick interpretation of the resonant properties of extrasolar planets and Kuiper Belt Objects, and will allow synthetic images of debris disc structures to be quickly generated, which will be useful for predicting and interpreting disc images made with ALMA, Darwin/TPF or similar missions. [Abridged]