• Despite being originally inspired by the central nervous system, artificial neural networks have diverged from their biological archetypes as they have been remodeled to fit particular tasks. In this paper, we review several possibilites to reverse map these architectures to biologically more realistic spiking networks with the aim of emulating them on fast, low-power neuromorphic hardware. Since many of these devices employ analog components, which cannot be perfectly controlled, finding ways to compensate for the resulting effects represents a key challenge. Here, we discuss three different strategies to address this problem: the addition of auxiliary network components for stabilizing activity, the utilization of inherently robust architectures and a training method for hardware-emulated networks that functions without perfect knowledge of the system's dynamics and parameters. For all three scenarios, we corroborate our theoretical considerations with experimental results on accelerated analog neuromorphic platforms.
  • We propose a unifying framework based on configuration linear programs and randomized rounding, for different energy optimization problems in the dynamic speed-scaling setting. We apply our framework to various scheduling and routing problems in heterogeneous computing and networking environments. We first consider the energy minimization problem of scheduling a set of jobs on a set of parallel speed scalable processors in a fully heterogeneous setting. For both the preemptive-non-migratory and the preemptive-migratory variants, our approach allows us to obtain solutions of almost the same quality as for the homogeneous environment. By exploiting the result for the preemptive-non-migratory variant, we are able to improve the best known approximation ratio for the single processor non-preemptive problem. Furthermore, we show that our approach allows to obtain a constant-factor approximation algorithm for the power-aware preemptive job shop scheduling problem. Finally, we consider the min-power routing problem where we are given a network modeled by an undirected graph and a set of uniform demands that have to be routed on integral routes from their sources to their destinations so that the energy consumption is minimized. We improve the best known approximation ratio for this problem.
  • In a bounded max-coloring of a vertex/edge weighted graph, each color class is of cardinality at most $b$ and of weight equal to the weight of the heaviest vertex/edge in this class. The bounded max-vertex/edge-coloring problems ask for such a coloring minimizing the sum of all color classes' weights. In this paper we present complexity results and approximation algorithms for those problems on general graphs, bipartite graphs and trees. We first show that both problems are polynomial for trees, when the number of colors is fixed, and $H_b$ approximable for general graphs, when the bound $b$ is fixed. For the bounded max-vertex-coloring problem, we show a 17/11-approximation algorithm for bipartite graphs, a PTAS for trees as well as for bipartite graphs when $b$ is fixed. For unit weights, we show that the known 4/3 lower bound for bipartite graphs is tight by providing a simple 4/3 approximation algorithm. For the bounded max-edge-coloring problem, we prove approximation factors of $3-2/\sqrt{2b}$, for general graphs, $\min\{e, 3-2/\sqrt{b}\}$, for bipartite graphs, and 2, for trees. Furthermore, we show that this problem is NP-complete even for trees. This is the first complexity result for max-coloring problems on trees.